< Lucas 12:39 >

39 Tami chanelad ocono, que si o julai e quer chanelase a ocana en que abillaria o randé, na querelaria o sobindoi, y na mequelaria enquerar su quer.
This
Strongs:
Lexicon:
οὗτος
Greek:
Τοῦτο
Transliteration:
Touto
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
this/he/she/it
Morphhology:
Demonstrative pronoun Accusative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a reference to SPECIFIC a neuter person or thing that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Alternates:
Tyndale
Word:
οὗτος
Transliteration:
ohutos
Gloss:
this/he/she/it
Morphhology:
Greek Demonstrative Pronoun
Definition:
οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο, genitive, τούτου, ταύτης, τούτου, [in LXX chiefly for זֹאת,זֶה;] demonstr. pron. (related to ἐκεῖνος as hic to ille), this; 1) as subst, this one, he; (a) absol: Mat.3:17, Mrk.9:7, Luk.7:44, 45, Jhn.1:15, Act.2:15, al; expressing contempt (cl.), Mat.13:55, 56, Mrk.6:2, 3, Jhn.6:42, al; εἰς τοῦτο, Mrk.1:38, Rom.14:9; μετὰ τοῦτο (ταῦτα; V. Westc. on Jhn.5:1), Jhn.2:12 11:7, al; (b) epanaleptic (referring to what precedes): Mat.5:19, Mrk.3:35, Luk.9:48, Jhn.6:46, Rom.7:10, al; (with) proleptic (referring to what follows): before ἵνα (Bl, §69, 6), Luk.1:43, Jhn.3:19 (and freq.) 15:8, Rom.14:9, al; before ὅτι, Luk.10:11, Jhn.9:3 o, Act.24:14, Rom.2:3, al; ὅπως, Rom.9:17; ἐάν, Jhn.13:35; (d) special idioms: τοῦτο μὲν. τ. δέ (cl), partly. partly. Heb.10:33; καὶ τοῦτο (τοῦτον, ταῦτα), and that (him) too, Rom.13:11, 1Co.2:2, Heb.11:12; τοῦτ᾽ ἐστιν, Mat.27:46. 2) As adj, with subst; (a) with art. (α) before the art: Mat.12:32, Mrk.9:29, Luk.7:44, Jhn.4:15, Rom.11:24, Rev.19:9, al; (β) after the noun: Mat.3:9, Mrk.12:16, Luk.11:31, Jhn.4:13, Act.6:13, Rom.15:28, 1Co.1:20, Rev.2:24, al; (b) with subst. anarth. (with predicative force; Bl, §49, 4): Luk.1:36 2:2 24:21, Jhn.2:11 4:54 21:14, 2Co.13:1. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οὗτος
Transliteration:
ohutos
Gloss:
this/he/she/it
Morphhology:
Greek Demonstrative Pronoun
Definition:
οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο, genitive τούτου, ταύτης, τούτου, etc: the dual feminine never in Attic dialect, see ὁ, ἡ, τό, [near the start]:—demonstrative pronoun, this, common from [Refs 8th c.BC+] A) ORIGIN and FORMS: οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο probably arose from a reduplication of the demonstrative ὁ, ἡ, τό with insertion of -υ- (= Sanskrit Particle u), e.g. ταῦτα from τα-υ-τα: Doric dialect genitive singular feminine τούτας [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc, the latter is uncertain in [Refs 5th c.BC+], as genitive singular neuter οὕτω [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; accusative singular feminine οὕταν [Refs 6th c.BC+] —In _Attic dialect_ οὗτος was frequently strengthened by the _demonstrative_ -ί, οὑτοσί, αὑτηί, τουτί, _genitive_ τουτουί, _dative_ τουτῳί, _accusative_ τουτονί; plural nominative οὑτοιί, neuter ταυτί, etc, this man here: sometimes a Particle is inserted between the pronoun and -ί, as αὑτηγί for αὑτηί γε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τουτογί for τουτί γε, [Refs]; ταυταγί for ταυτί γε, [Refs]; τουτοδί for τουτὶ δέ, [Refs]; τουτουμενί for τουτουὶ μέν, [Refs] —In codices the ν ἐφελκυστικόν is sometimes added in the forms οὑτοσίν, οὑτωσίν, and οὑτοσίν is said to be Attic dialect by [Refs 2nd c.AD+]. [This ι is always long, and a long vowel or diphthong before it becomes short, as αὑτη?~Xί, τουτω?~Xί, οὑτοῐί, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) USAGE in regard to CONCOR[Refs 4th c.BC+] is frequently used as a pronoun substantive: hence neuter is followed by genitive, κατὰ τοῦτο τῆς ἀκροπόλιος [Refs 5th c.BC+] adjective, in which case its substantive commonly takes the Article, οὗτος ὁ ἀνήρ or ὁ ἀνὴρ οὗτος.—But the Article is absent, B.1) always in Epic dialect Poets (except [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes also in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) sometimes when the Noun is so specified that the Article is not needed, ἐς γῆν ταύτην, ἥντινα νῦν Σκύθαι νέμονται [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.3) when οὗτος is used in local sense, here, see below with [Refs] B.4) when the Noun with which οὗτος agrees stands as its Predicate, αὕτη γὰρ ἦν σοι πρόφασις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δικαστοῦ αὕτη ἀρετή [ἐστι] [Refs 5th c.BC+] these were the grievances which already existed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταύτην φήμην παρέδοσαν this was the report which, [Refs 5th c.BC+] this was notably the greatest movement which, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.5) when 3rd pers. is used for 2nd pers. to express contempt, οὗτος ἀνήρ, οὑτοσὶ ἀνήρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) though οὗτος usually agrees with the Noun that serves as Predicate, it is not rare to find it in the neuter, μανία δὲ καὶ τοῦτ᾽ ἐστί [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and in plural, οὐκ ἔστι ταῦτα ἀρχή [Refs 4th c.BC+]: so with an explanatory clause added, τοῦτο γάρ ἐστιν ὁ συκοφάντης, αἰτιᾶσθαι μὲν πάντα ἐξελέγξαι δὲ μηδέν [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.2) so also with a Noun in apposition, τούτοισιν μὲν ταῦτα μέλει, κίθαρις καὶ ἀοιδή [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.II.3) the neuter also may refer to a masculine or feminine Noun, καρπὸν φορέει κυάμῳ ἴσον: τοῦτο ἐπεὰν γένηται πέπον κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.4) the neuter is also used of classes of persons, μελιτοπῶλαι καὶ τυροπῶλαι: τοῦτο δ᾽ εἰς ἕν ἐστι συγκεκυφός [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or of an abstract fact, οὐκ Ἰοφῶν ζ;—τοῦτο γάρ τοι καὶ μόνον ἔτ᾽ ἐστὶ λοιπὸν ἀγαθόν [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) with Prons, B.III.1) personal, οὗτος σύ, in local sense, see below B.III.2) interrogative, τί τοῦτ᾽ ἔλεξα; what is this that? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ποίοισι τούτοι; for ποῖά ἐστι ταῦτα οἷς [ἔχεις ἐλπίδα]; [Refs]; Νέστορ᾽ ἔρειο ὅν τινα τοῦτον ἄγει whom he brings here, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.3) with οἷος, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.4) possessive, πατὴρ σὸς οὗτος this father of thine, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.5) demonstrative, οὗτος ἐκεῖνος, τὸν σὺ ζητέεις, where ἐκεῖνος is the Predicate, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦτον τὸν αὐτὸν ἄνδρα this same man, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.5.b) exceptionally, Διφίλου οὗτος ὅδ᾽ ἐστὶ τύπος [Refs] B.III.6) ἄλλος τις οὗτος ἀνέστη another man here, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.IV) with Numerals, τέθνηκε ταῦτα τρία ἔτη these three years, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [στρατείαν] ἑνδέκατον μῆνα τουτονὶ ποιεῖται for these eleven months, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) SIGNIFICATION AND SPECIAL IDIOMS: C.I) this, to designate the nearer, opposed to ἐκεῖνος, that, the more remote, ταῦτα, like τὰ ἐνταῦθα, things round and about us, earthly things, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare ὅδε [near the start]: but οὗτος sometimes indicates that which is not really nearest, but most important, δεῖ. τὸ βέλτιστον ἀεί, μὴ τὸ ῥᾷστον λέγειν: ἐπὶ ἐκεῖνο μὲν γὰρ ἡ φύσις αὐτὴ βαδιεῖται, ἐπὶ τοῦτο δὲ κτλ. [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.2) when, of two things, one precedes and the other follows, ὅδε properly refers to what follows, οὗτος to what precedes, οὐκ ἔστι σοι ταῦτ᾽, ἀλλά σοι τάδ᾽ ἔστι [Refs 5th c.BC+] refers to what follows, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὔκουν. τοῦτο γιγνώσκεις, ὅτι; [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.3) οὗτος is used emphatic, generally in contempt, while ἐκεῖνος denotes praise, ὁ πάντ᾽ ἄναλκις οὗτος, i.e. Aegisthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+] of Philip; but οὗτος is used of Philip, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.3.b) of what is familiar, τούτους τοὺς πολυτελεῖς χιτῶνας, of the Persians, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ θυλακῶδες τοῦτο the familiar bag-like thing, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.4) in Attic dialect law-language, οὗτος is commonly applied to the opponent, whether plaintiff (as in [Refs 4th c.BC+] or defendant (as in [Refs]; so, in the political speeches of [Refs 4th c.BC+] are the opposite party, [Refs], etc; but in the forensic speeches, οὗτοι frequently means the judges, the court, [Refs] C.I.5) much like an adverb, in local sense (compare ὅδε [near the start]), τίς δ᾽ οὗτος κατὰ νῆας. ἔρχεα; who art thou here that comest? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; frequently in Attic dialect, τίς οὑτοσ; who's this here? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πολλὰ ὁρῶ ταῦτα πρόβατα I see many sheep here, [Refs 5th c.BC+] ho you! you there! [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with a proper name, ὦ οὗτος, Αἴας [Refs 5th c.BC+] —This phrase mostly implies anger, impatience, or scorn. C.II) simply as antecedent to ὅς, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.III) = τοιοῦτος, οὗτος ἐγὼ ταχυτᾶτι [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.IV) after a parenthesis, the Subject, though already named, is frequently emphatic repeated by οὗτος, οὐδὲ γὰρ οὐδὲ Ἀριστέης, οὐδὲ οὗτος προσωτέρω. ἔφησε ἀπικέσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.V) καὶ οὗτος is added to heighten the force of a previous word, ξυνεστῶτες. ναυτικῷ ἀγῶνι, καὶ τούτῳ πρὸς Ἀθηναίους [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see infr. VIII.2. C.VI) repeated, where for the second we should merely say he or it, τοῖσιν τούτου τοῦτον μέλεσιν. κελαδοῦντες [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII) ταῦτα is used in some special phrases, C.VII.1) ταῦτ᾽, ὦ δέσποτα yes Sir (i. e. ἔστι ταῦτα, ταῦτα δράσω, etc.), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so also ἦν ταῦτα even so, true, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII.2) ταῦτα μὲν δὴ ὑπάρξει so it shall be, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII.3) καὶ ταῦτα μὲν δὴ ταῦτα so much for that, frequently in Attic dialect, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII.4) ταῦτα at end of a formula in epitaphs, etc, probably short for ταῦτα οὕτως ἔχει or ὁ βίος ταῦτά ἐστιν, e.g. οὐδὶς (= -εὶς) ἀθάνατος: ταῦτα [Refs 2nd c.AD+] C.VIII) Adverbial usages: C.VIII.1) ταῦταabsolutely, therefore, that is why, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ ταῦτα ἥκω, ἵνα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] is rare in this sense, τοῦτ᾽ ἀφικόμην, ὅπως. εὖ πράξαιμί τι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ γὰρ τοῦτο just because of this, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.1.b) πρὸς ταῦτα so then, therefore, properly used in indignant defiance, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.2) καὶ ταῦτα, adding a circumstance heightening the force of what has been said, and that, ἄνδρα γενναῖον θανεῖν, καὶ ταῦτα πρὸς γυναικός [Refs 4th c.BC+]: but mostly with a participle, ὅς γ᾽ ἐξέλυσας ἄστυ, καὶ ταῦθ᾽ ὑφ᾽ ἡμῶν οὐδὲν ἐξειδὼς πλέον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or with a participle omitted, ἥτις. τὴν τεκοῦσαν ὕβρισεν, καὶ ταῦτα τηλικοῦτος (i.e. οὖσα) [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.2.b) καὶ ταῦτα anyhow, no matter what happens (or happened), ἐπεχείρησας, οὐδὲν ὢν καὶ ταῦτα you tried, but were no good anyhow, i.e. try as you might, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.VIII.3) τοῦτο μέν, τοῦτο δέ. on the one hand, on the other, partly, partly, very frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦτο μέν is sometimes answered by δέ only,[Refs 5th c.BC+]; by δὲ αὖ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by ἔπειτα δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by ἀλλά, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; by εἶτα, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by τοῦτ᾽ αὖθις, [Refs] C.VIII.4) dative feminine ταύτῃ, C.VIII.4.a) on this spot, here, ταύτῃ μὲν, τῇδε δ᾽ αὖ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.4.b) in this point, herein, μηδὲν ταύτῃ γε κομήσῃς [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.4.c) in this way, thus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; to ὅπῃ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταύτῃ καλεῖσθαι, etc, like οὕτω κ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.5) ἐκ τούτου or τούτων thereupon, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; therefore, [Refs] C.VIII.6) ἐν τούτῳ in that case, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.6.b) in the meantime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.7) πρὸς τούτοις (-οισι) besides, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
οὗτος
Transliteration:
hoûtos
Pronounciation:
how'-tahee
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the he (she or it), i.e. this or that (often with article repeated); he (it was that), hereof, it, she, such as, the same, these, they, this (man, same, woman), which, who; from the article g3588 (ὁ) and g846 (αὐτός)

however
Strongs:
Lexicon:
δέ
Greek:
δὲ
Transliteration:
de
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
but/and
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most frequently without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative)

do know
Strongs:
Lexicon:
γινώσκω
Greek:
γινώσκετε
Transliteration:
ginōskete
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to know
Morphhology:
Verb Present Active Imperative 2nd Plural
Grammar:
an ACTION that certainly happens - by persons being spoken or written to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Other Spelling:
Tyn: γεινώσκετε;
Tyndale
Word:
γινώσκω
Transliteration:
ginōskō
Gloss:
to know
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
γινώσκω (= γιγν: see previous word. So also vulgar Attic, in Inscr, see Thumb, MGV, 207), [in LXX chiefly for ידע;] to be taking in knowledge, come to know, recognize, perceive, understand; in past tenses to know, realize; pass, to become known: with accusative, Mat.22:18, Mrk.5:43, Col.4:8, 1Th.3:5, al. Pass, Mat.10:26, Php.4:5, al; before ὅτι, Mat.21:45, Jhn.4:1, al; τί, Mat.6:3; ἀπό, Mrk.15:45; ὅ, Rom.7:15; τ. λεγόμενα, Luk.18:34; τ. θέλημα, Luk.12:47; τ. καρδίας, Luk.16:15; with accusative of person(s), of recognition by God, 1Co.8:3, Gal.4:9; by Christ, neg, Mat.7:23; frequently of the knowledge of divine things, of God and Christ; τ. θεόν, Rom.1:21 Gal.4:9; τ. πατέρα, Jhn.8:55; τ. κύριον, Heb.8:1 (LXX); νοῦν κυρίου, Rom.11:34; Χριστόν, Jhn.17:3, 1Jn.3:6; τὰ τοῦ πνεύματος, 1Co.2:14; τ. πνεύμα, 1Jn.4:6; τ. ἀλήθειαν, Jhn.8:32; of Christ's knowledge of the Father (ἐπιγ.), Mat.11:27 (Dalman, Words, 282ff.). In Hellenistic writers [LXX for Heb. ידע, Gal.4:1, al.], of sexual intercourse, to know carnally: Mat.1:25, Luk.1:34 (Cremer, 153). SYN.: γ, to know by observation and experience is thus prop. disting. from οἶδα, to know by reflection (a mental process, based on intuition or information); cf. also ἐφίστημι, συνίημι. (Cf. ἀνα, δια, ἐπι, κατα, προ-γινώσκω.) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
γινώσκω
Transliteration:
ginōskō
Gloss:
to know
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
Included with: γιγνώσκω, Doric dialect [Refs 5th c.BC+], Aeolic dialect, Ionic dialect, and after [Refs 4th c.BC+] γινώσκω, but γιγνώσκω in early Attic dialect Inscrr, as [Refs] (κατα-), etc: future γνώσομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+], Doric dialect 3rd.pers. singular γνωσεῖται [Refs] is falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Cretan dialect form ἀνα-γνώοντι uncertain in [Refs]: perfect ἔγνωκα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist 2 ἔγνων [Refs 8th c.BC+], Epic dialect dual γνώτην [Refs 8th c.BC+], Doric dialect 3rd.pers. plural ἔγνον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; subjunctive γνῶ, γνῷς, γνῷ [Refs 8th c.BC+], Epic dialect also γνώω, γνώομεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; infinitive γνῶναι [Refs 8th c.BC+], Epic dialect γνώμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; participle γνούς [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle, aorist 1 γνώσασθαι [Refs 4th c.AD+]:—passive, future γνωσθήσομαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist ἐγνώσθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]: perfect ἔγνωσμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]:— come to know, perceive, and in past tenses, know, with accusative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; as distinct from οἶδα know by reflection, γιγνώσκω, = know by observation, γνόντες δὲ εἰδότας περιορᾶν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χαλεπόν ἐστι τὸ γνῶναι εἰ οἶδεν ἢ μή it is hard to perceive whether one knows or not, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; discern, distinguish, recognize, ὄφρ᾽ εὖ γιγνώσκῃς ἠμὲν θεὸν ἠδὲ καὶ ἄνδρα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ironically, εὖ νύ τις αὐτὸν γνώσεται he will learn him to his cost,[Refs 3rd c.BC+] were aware of, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 2) followed by relative clauses, γιγνώσκω δ᾽ ὡς. I perceive that,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; γ. ὅτι. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἵν᾽ εἰδῆτε ὑμεῖς καὶ γνῶτε ὅτι. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοὺς Πέρσας γ. ὅτι. [Refs]participle, ἔγνων μιν. οἰωνὸν ἐόντα perceived that he was, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἔγνων ἡττημένος I felt that I was beaten, [Refs 5th c.BC+] when he was aware of, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with infinitive, ἵνα γνῷ τρέφειν τὴν γλῶσσαν ἡσυχεστέραν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with accusative et infinitive, recognize that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; take a thing to mean that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with double accusative, perceive or know another to be, οἵους γνώσεσθε τοὺς ἀνθρώπους [Refs 5th c.BC+] the perceiver, opposed to τὰ γιγνωσκόμενα the objects perceived, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὁ γ. one who knows, a prudent person, [Refs]:—passive, εἰ γνωσθεῖεν ᾧ. if it were known of them in what, [Refs] II) form a judgement, think, ταὐτά [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ γιγνώσκω λέγειν (={τὴν γνώμην λ}.) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῦτο γιγνώσκων, ὅτι. [Refs 5th c.BC+] see thou to that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in dialogue, ἔγνων I understand, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔγνως you are right, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔγνωκα; Latin tenes? [Refs 4th c.BC+]; judge, determine, decree that, with accusative et infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with infinitive, determine to, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:— passive, to be pronounced, of a sentence or judgement, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) passive, of persons, to be judged guilty, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.3) perfect passive with active sense, ὡμολόγηκεν ὑμᾶς ὑπάρχειν ἐγνωσμένους are determined, [Refs 4th c.BC+] III) know carnally, [NT+4th c.BC+] IV) γ. χάριν, ={εἰδέναι χάριν}, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] B) causal, make known, celebrate, γνώσομαι τὰν ὀλβίαν Κόρινθον [Refs 5th c.BC+], cf. Sanskrit jānāmi, jñātas, Latin gnosco, gnotus, etc.)
Strongs
Word:
γινώσκω
Transliteration:
ginṓskō
Pronounciation:
ghin-oce'-ko
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to "know" (absolutely) in a great variety of applications and with many implications (as follow, with others not thus clearly expressed); allow, be aware (of), feel, (have) know(-ledge), perceived, be resolved, can speak, be sure, understand; a prolonged form of a primary verb

that
Strongs:
Strongs extended:
Greek:
ὅτι
Transliteration:
hoti
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
that/since
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
that/since, that
Tyndale
Word:
ὅτι
Transliteration:
hoti
Gloss:
that/since: that
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
ὅτι, conjc. (prop. neut. of ὅστις). I. As conjc, introducing an objective clause, that; 1) after verbs of seeing, knowing, thinking, saying, feeling: Mat.3:9 6:32 11:25, Mrk.3:28, Luk.2:49, Jhn.2:22, Act.4:13, Rom.1:13 8:38 10:9, Php.4:15, Jas.2:24, al; elliptically, Jhn.6:46, Php.3:12, al. 2) After εἶναι (γίνεσθαι): defining a demonstr. or of person(s) pron, Jhn.3:19 16:19, Rom.9:6, 1Jn.3:16 al; with pron. interrog, Mat.8:27, Mrk.4:41, Luk.4:36, Jhn.4:22 al; id. elliptically, Luk.2:49, Act.5:4, 9, al; 3) Untranslatable, before direct discourse (ὅτι recitantis): Mat.7:23, Mrk.2:16, Luk.1:61, Jhn.1:20, Act.15:1, Heb.11:18, al. (on the pleonastic ὡς ὅτι, see: ὡς). II. As causal particle, for that, because: Mat.5:4-12, Luk.6:20, 21, J0 1:30 5:27, Act.1:5, 1Jn.4:18, Rev.3:10, al. mult; διὰ τοῦτο ὅτι, Jhn.8:47 10:17, al; answering a question (διὰ τί), Rom.9:32, al; οὐκ ὅτι. ἀλλ᾽ ὅτι, Jhn.6:26 12:6. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὅτι
Transliteration:
hoti
Gloss:
that/since: that
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
ὅτῐ, Epic dialect ὅττῐ (both in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: conjunction, to introduce an objective clause, that, after Verbs of seeing or knowing, thinking or saying; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] —Usage: I) when ὅτι introduces a statement of fact: I.a) in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always with indicative, the tense following the same rules as in English, ἤγγειλ᾽ ὅττι ῥά οἱ πόσις ἔκτοθι μίμνε πυλάων [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.b) in Attic dialect, ὅτι takes indicative after primary tenses, indicative or optative after secondary tenses, e.g. ἐνδείκνυμαι ὅτι οὐκ ἔστι σοφός [Refs 5th c.BC+] news came that Megara had (literal has) revolted, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes optative and indicative are found in the same sentence, ἔλεγον, ὅτι Κῦρος μὲν τέθνηκεν, Ἀριαῖος δὲ πεφευγὼς. εἴη [Refs 5th c.BC+]. and the accusative with infinitive are found together, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) when ὅτι introduces a conditional sentence, the Constr. after ὅτι is the same as in independent conditional sentences, εἴ τις ἔροιτο, καθ᾽ ὁποίους νόμους δεῖ πολιτεύεσθαι, δῆλον ὅτι ἀποκρίναισθ᾽ ἄν. it is manifest that you would answer, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) ὅτι is frequently inserted pleonastic in introducing a quotation (where we use no conjunction and put inverted commas), λόγον τόνδε ἐκφαίνει ὁ Πρωτεύς, λέγων ὅτι ἐγὼ εἰ μὴ περὶ πολλοῦ ἡγεύμην. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ ἐγὼ εἶπον, ὅ. ἡ αὐτή μοι ἀρχή ἐστι. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even where the quotation consists of one word,[Refs] II.2) ὅ. is also used pleonastic with the infinitive and accusative [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but ὅτι has frequently been wrongly inserted by the copyists, as if εἶπεν or λέγουσιν must be followed by it, as in [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) ὅτι in Attic dialect frequently represents a whole sentence, especially in affirmative answers, οὐκοῦν. τὸ ἀδικεῖν κάκιον ἂν εἴη τοῦ ἀδικεῖσθαι. Answ. δῆλον δὴ ὅτι (i.e. ὅτι κάκιον ἂν εἴη, or ὅτι ταῦτα οὕτως ἔχει) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare οἶδ᾽ ὅτι, ἴσθ᾽ ὅτι, οἶσθ᾽ ὅτι, [Refs 5th c.BC+] adverb III.2) what we make the subject of the Verb which follows ὅτι frequently stands in the preceding clause, Αυκάονας δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ εἴδομεν, ὅτι. καρποῦνται (for εἴδομεν, ὅτι Λυκάονες καρποῦνται) [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) ὅτι sometimes = with regard to the fact that, ὅτι. οὔ φησι. ὄνομα εἶναι, ὑποπτεύω αὐτὸν σκώπτειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] V) οὐχ ὅ, ἀλλὰ or ἀλλὰ καὶ, οὐχ ὅ. ὁ Κρίτων ἐν ἡσυχίᾳ ἦν, ἀλλὰ οἱ φίλοι αὐτοῦ not only [Refs 1st c.AD+], but his friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+] not only the powers in Europe, but, [Refs 5th c.BC+], not followed by a second clause, means although, οὐχ ὅ. παίζει καί φησι [Refs 5th c.BC+] V.2) for ὅτι μή, see at {ὅ τι} 11. B) as a causal Particle, for that, because, generally after Verbs of feeling, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but without such a Verb, ὃν περὶ πάσης τῖεν ὁμηλικίης, ὅτι οἱ φρεσὶν ἄρτια ᾔδη [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.b) followed by τί, ὅτι τ; why? (literal because why?) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὅτι τί δ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅτι δὴ τί μάλιστ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅτι δὴ τί γ; [Refs]; compare ὁτιή. B.2) seeing that, in giving the reason for saying what is said, γλαυκὴ δέ σε τίκτε θάλασσα. ὅτι τοι νόος ἐστὶν ἀπηνής as is proved by the fact that, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (ὅ τ᾽) probably always represents ὅτε (ὅ τε): there are no examples of ὅττ᾽: hiatus after ὅτι is permitted in Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs > g3754
Word:
ὅτι
Transliteration:
hóti
Pronounciation:
hot'-ee
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
demonstrative, that (sometimes redundant); causative, because; as concerning that, as though, because (that), for (that), how (that), (in) that, though, why; neuter of g3748 (ὅστις) as conjunction

if
Strongs:
Greek:
εἰ
Transliteration:
ei
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Grammar:
a conditional
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
if, if/whether
Tyndale
Word:
εἰ
Transliteration:
ei
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek Conditional
Definition:
εἰ, conjunctive particle, used in conditions and in indirect questions. I. Conditional, if; 1) with indic, expressing a general assumption; (a) pres: before indic, pres, Mat.11:14, Rom.8:25, al; before imperat, Mrk.4:23 9:22, Jhn.15:18, 1Co.7:9, al; before fut. indic, Luk.16:31, Rom.8:11, al; before pf. or aor, with negation in apodosis, Mat.12:26, Rom.4:14, al; similarly, before impf, Luk.17:6, Jhn.8:39; before quæst, Mat.6:23, Jhn.5:47 7:23 8:46, 1Pe.2:20; (b) fut: Mat.26:33, 1Pe.2:20; (with) pf: Jhn.11:12, Rom.6:5, al; (d) aor: Luk.16:11 19:8, Jhn.13:32, 18:23, Rev.20:15, al. 2) Where the assumption is certain = ἐπεί: Mat.12:28, Jhn.7:4, Rom.5:17, al. 3) Of an unfulfilled condition, with indic, impf, aor. or plpf, before ἄν, with imp. or aor. (see: ἄν, I, i). 4) C. indic, after verbs denoting wonder, etc, sometimes, but not always, coupled with an element of doubt: Mrk.15:44, 1Jn.3:13, al. 5) C. indic, as in LXX (Num.14:3 o, 1Ki.14:45, al. = Heb. אִם), in oaths, with the formula of imprecation understood in a suppressed apodosis (WM, 627; Burton, §272): Mrk.8:12, Heb.3:11 " (LXX) 4:3 (LXX). 6) Rarely (cl.) with optative, to express a merely possible condition: Act.24:19 27:39, 1Co.14:10 15:37, I Pe3:14, 17. II. Interrogative, if, whether. 1) As in cl, in indir. questions after verbs of seeing, asking, knowing, saying, etc: with indic. pres, Mat.26:63, Mrk.15:36, Act.19:2, 2Co.13:5, al; fut, Mrk.3:2, Act.8:22, al; aor, Mrk.15:44, 1Co.1:16, al; with subjc. aor. (M, Pr., 194), Php.3:12. 2) As in LXX (= Heb. אִם and interrog. הֲ, Gen.17:17, al; see WM, 639f; Viteau, i, 22), in direct questions: Mrk.8:23 (Tr, WH, txt.), Luk.13:23, 22:49, Act.19:2, al. III. With other particles. 1) εἰ ἄρα, εἴγε, εἰ δὲ μήγε, see: ἄρα, γε. 2) εἰ δὲ καί, but if also: Luk.11:18; but even if, 1Co.4:7, 2Co.4:3 11:16. 3) εἰ δὲ μή, but if not, but if otherwise: Mrk.2:21, 22 Jhn.14:2, Rev.2:5, al. 4) εἰ καί, if even, if also, although: Mrk.14:29, Luk.11:8, 1Co.7:21, 2Co.4:16, Php.2:17, al. 5) καὶ εἰ, even if, see: καί 6) εἰ μή, if not, unless, except, but only: Mat.24:22, Mrk.2:26 6:5, Jhn.9:33, 1Co.7:17 (only), Gal.1:19 (cf. ἐὰν μή, 2:16; see Hort, Ja., xvi); ἐκτὸς εἰ μή, pleonastic (Bl, §65, 6), 1Co.14:5 15:2, 1Ti.5:19. 7) εἰ μήν = cl. ἦ μήν (M, Pr., 46), in oaths, surely (Eze.33:27, al.): Heb.6:14. 8) εἴ πως, if haply: Act.27:12, Rom.1:10. 9) εἴτε. εἴτε, whether. or; Rom.12:6-8, 1Co.3:22 13:8, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
εἰ
Transliteration:
ei
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek Conditional
Definition:
εἰ, Attic dialect-Ionic dialect and [Refs 4th c.AD+] ἤ [Refs] in Epic dialect:— Particle used interjectionally with imperative and to express a wish, but usually either in conditions, if, or in indirect questions, whether. In the former use its regular negative is μ; in the latter, οὐ. A) INTERJECTIONALLY, in [Refs 8th c.BC+], come now! with imperative, εἰ δὲ. ἄκουσον [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.2) in wishes, with optative, ἀλλ᾽ εἴ τις. καλέσειεν [Refs]; so later, εἴ μοι ξυνείη μοῖρα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of unattained wishes, in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; later with past tenses of indicative, εἰ γάρ μ᾽ ὑπὸ γῆν. ἧκεν [Refs 4th c.BC+]; εἰ γὰρ τοσαύτην δύναμιν εἶχον ὥστε. [Refs 8th c.BC+]infinitive (compare the use of infinitive in commands), αἰ γὰρ τοῖος ἐὼν. ἐμὸς γαμβρὸς καλέεσθαι [Refs] A.2.b) εἴθε, Epic dialect αἴθε, is frequently used in wishes in the above constructions, εἴθε οἱ αὐτῷ Ζεὺς ἀγαθὸν τελέσειεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: later with infinitive, γαίης χθαμαλωτέρη εἴθε. κεῖσθαι [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.2.c) εἰ γάρ, εἴθε are also used with ὤφελον (Epic dialect ὤφελλον), of past unattained wishes, αἴθ᾽ ὤφελλες στρατοῦ ἄλλου σημαίνειν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ γὰρ ὤφελον [κατιδεῖν] [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.2.d) followed by a clause expressing a consequence of the fulfilment of the wish, αἰ γὰρ τοῦτο. ἔπος τετελεσμένον εἴη· τῷ κε τάχα γνοίης. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes hard to distinguish from εἰ in conditions (which may be derived from this use), εἴ μοί τι πίθοιο, τό κεν πολὺ κέρδιον εἴη [Refs 8th c.BC+] B) IN CONDITIONS, if: B.I) with INDIC, B.I.1) with all tenses (for future, see below [Refs]if this is so, it will be, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: any form of the Verb may stand in apodosi, εἰ θεοί τι δρῶσιν αἰσχρόν, οὐκ εἰσὶν θεοί [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ οὗτοι ὀρθῶς ἀπέστησαν, ὑμεῖς ἂν οὐ χρεὼν ἄρχοιτε if these were right in their revolt, (it would follow that) you rule when you have no right, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.1.b) to express a general condition, if ever, whenever, sometimes with present, εἴ τις δύο ἢ καὶ πλείους τις ἡμέρας λογίζεται, μάταιός ἐστιν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with imperfect, εἴ τίς τι ἠρώτα ἀπεκρίνοντο [Refs 5th c.BC+]: rarely with aorist, [Refs 1st c.BC+] B.I.2) with future (much less frequently than ἐάν with subjunctive), either to express a future supposition emphatically, εἰ φθάσομεν τοὺς πολεμίους κατακαίνοντες οὐδεὶς ἡμῶν ἀποθανεῖται [Refs 5th c.BC+] in threats or warnings, εἰ μὴ καθέξεις γλῶσσαν ἔσται σοι κακά [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) to express a present intention or expectation, αἶρε πλῆκτρον εἰ μαχεῖ if you mean to fight, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.3) with historical tenses, implying that the condition is or was unfulfilled. B.I.3.a) with imperfect, referring to present time or to continued or repeated action in past time (in [Refs 8th c.BC+], if they did not live an abstemious life, [Refs 5th c.BC+] would not have been master of islands, if he had not had also some naval force, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; εἰ ἦσαν ἄνδρες ἀγαθοὶ. οὐκ ἄν ποτε ταῦτα ἔπασχον if they had been good men, they would never have suffered as they did, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ γὰρ ἐγὼ τάδε ᾔδἐ. οὐκ ἂν ὑπεξέφυγε if I had known this, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.3.b) with aorist referring to past time, εἰ μὴ ἔφυσε θεὸς μέλι. ἔφασκον γλύσσονα σῦκα πέλεσθαι [Refs 6th c.BC+]; εἰ μὴ ὑμεῖς ἤλθετε, ἐπορευόμεθα ἂν ἐπὶ βασιλέα had you not come, we should be on our way, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with pluperfect in apodosi, εἰ τριάκοντα μόναι μετέπεσον τῶν ψήφων, ἀπεπεφεύγη ἄν [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3.c) rarely with pluperfect referring to action finished in past or present time, λοιπὸν δ᾽ ἂν ἦν ἡμῖν ἔτι περὶ τῆς πόλεως διαλεχθῆναι, εἰ μὴ προτέρα τῶν ἄλλων τὴν εἰρήνην ἐπεποίητο if she had not (as she has done) made peace before the rest, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) with SUB[Refs 1st c.AD+] (Epic dialect κε, κεν), compare ἐάν: [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but ἄν (κε, κεν) are frequently absent in [Refs 8th c.BC+], cf. Foed.Doric dialect cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; occasionally in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; very rarely in Attic dialect Prose, εἰ ξυστῶσιν αἱ πόλεις [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in later Prose, εἴ τις θελήσῃ [NT+3rd c.AD+] B.II.1) when the apodosis is future, to express a future condition more distinctly and vividly than εἰ with optative, but less so than εἰ with future indicative (above [Refs]; εἰ δέ κεν ὣς ἕρξῃς καί τοι πείθωνται Ἀχαιοί, γνώσῃ ἔπειθ᾽. if thou do thus, thou shalt know, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἂν μὴ νῦν ἐθέλωμεν ἐκεῖ πολεμεῖν αὐτῷ, ἐνθάδ᾽ ἴσως ἀναγκασθησόμεθα τοῦτο ποιεῖν if we be not now willing, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) when the apodosis is present, denoting customary or repeated action, to express a general condition, if ever, ἤν ποτε δασμὸς ἵκηται, σοὶ τὸ γέρας πολὺ μεῖζον (i.e. ἐστί) whenever a division comes, your prize is (always) greater, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἢν ἐγγὺς ἔλθῃ θάνατος, οὐδεὶς βούλεται θνῄσκειν if death come near, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with ἄν omitted, εἴ περ γάρ τε χόλον. καταπέψῃ ἀλλά. ἔχει κότον [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.II.2.b) with Rhet. present in apodosis, ἐὰν μὴ οἱ φιλόσοφοι βασιλεύσωσιν, οὐκ ἔστι κακῶν παῦλα there is (i.e. can be, will be) no rest, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) with OPTATIVE (never with ἄν in early Gr, later ἐάν with optative, [Refs 5th c.AD+] B.III.1) to express a future condition less definitely than ἐάν with subjunctive, usually with optative with ἄν in apodosis, ἦ κεν γηθήσαι Πρίαμος Πριάμοιό τε παῖδες. εἰ σφῶιν τάδε πάντα πυθοίατο μαρναμένοιιν surely they would exult, if they should hear, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: future optative is falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with present indicative in apodosis, [Refs 6th c.BC+]: with future indicative, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.1.b) in Hom.sometimes with present optative, to express an unfulfilled present condition, εἰ μὲν νῦν ἐπὶ ἄλλῳ ἀεθλεύοιμεν, ἦ τ᾽ ἂν ἐγὼ τὰ πρῶτα φεροίμην if we were now contending, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.2) when the apodosis is past, denoting customary or repeated action, to express a general condition in past time (corresponding to use of subjunctive in present time, above [Refs]; once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ δέ τινας θορυβουμένους αἴσθοιτο, κατασβεννύναι τὴν ταραχὴν ἐπειρᾶτο if he should see (whenever he saw) any troops in confusion, he (always) tried, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴ τις ἀντείποι, εὐθὺς ἐτεθνήκει if any one made objection, he was a dead man at once, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: indicative and optative are found in same sentence, ἐμίσει, οὐκ εἴ τις κακῶς πάσχων ἠμύνετο, ἀλλ᾽ εἴ τις εὐεργετούμενος ἀχάριστος φαίνοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.3) in oratio obliqua after past tenses, representing ἐάν with subjunctive or εἰ with a primary (never an historical) tense of the indicative in oratio recta, ἐλογίζοντο ὡς, εἰ μὴ μάχοιντο, ἀποστήσοιντο αἱ πόλεις (representing ἐὰν μὴ μαχώμεθα, ἀποστήσονται) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔλεγεν ὅτι, εἰ βλαβερὰ πεπραχὼς εἴη, δίκαιος εἴη ζημιοῦσθαι (representing εἰ βλαβερὰ πέπραχε, δίκαιός ἐστι)[Refs]; εἰ δέ τινα φεύγοντα λήψοιτο, προηγόρευεν ὅτι ὡς πολεμίῳ χρήσοιτο (representing εἴ τινα λήψομαι, χρήσομαι) [Refs]; also, where oratio obliqua is implied in the leading clause, οὐκ ἦν τοῦ πολέμου πέρας Φιλίππῳ, εἰ μὴ Θηβαίους. ἐχθροὺς ποιήσειε τῇ πόλει, i.e. Philip thought there would be no end to the war, unless he should make. (his thought having been ἐὰν μὴ ποιήσω), [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.4) with optative with ἄν, only when the clause serves as apodosis as well as protasis,[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) with infinitive, in oratio obliqua, only in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.V) after Verbs denoting wonder, delight, indignation, disappointment, contentment, and similar emotions, εἰ with indicative is used instead of ὅτι, to express the object of the feeling in a hypothetical form, θαυμάζω εἰ μηδεὶς ὑμῶν μήτ᾽ ἐνθυμεῖται μήτ᾽ ὀργίζεται, ὁρῶν. I wonder that no one of you is either concerned or angry when he sees, [Refs 4th c.BC+]: after past tenses, ἐθαύμασε δ᾽ εἰ μὴ φανερόν ἐστιν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐθαύμαζε δ᾽ εἴ τις ἀρετὴν ἐπαγγελλόμενος ἀργύριον πράττοιτο he wondered that any one should demand money, [Refs]; ἔχαιρον ἀγαπῶν εἴ τις ἐάσοι I rejoiced, being content if any one should let it pass, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —in this use the _negative_ οὐ is also found, ἀγανακτῶ εἰ ὁ Φίλιππος ἁρπάζων οὐ λυπεῖ [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.VI) in citing a fact as a ground of argument or appeal, as surely as, since, εἴ ποτ᾽ ἔην γε if there was [as there was], i.e. as sure as there was such an one, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πολλοὺς γὰρ οἶκε εἶναι εὐπετέστερον διαβάλλειν ἢ ἕνα, εἰ Κλεομένεα μὲν μοῦνον οὐκ οἷός τε ἐγένετο διαβαλεῖν, τρεῖς δὲ μυριάδας Ἀθηναίων ἐποίησε τοῦτο it seems easier to deceive many than one, if (as was the fact, i.e. since) he was not able, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.VII) ELLIPTICAL CONSTRUCTIONS: B.VII.1) with apodosis implied in the context, εἰ having the force of in case, supposing that, πρὸς τὴν πόλιν, εἰ ἐπιβοηθοῖεν, ἐχώρουν they marched towards the city [so as to meet the citizens], in case they should rush out, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἱκέται πρὸς σὲ δεῦρ᾽ ἀφίγμεθα, εἴ τινα πόλιν φράσειας ἡμῖν εὔερον we have come hither to you, in case you should tell us of some fleecy city (i.e. that we might hear of it), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παρέζεο καὶ λαβὲ γούνων, αἴ κέν πως ἐθέλῃσιν ἐπὶ Τρώεσσιν ἀρῆξαι sit by him and grasp his knees [so as to persuade him], in case he be willing to help the Trojans, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄκουσον καὶ ἐμοῦ, ἐάν σοι ἔτι ταὐτὰ δοκῇ hear me also [that you may assent], in case the same opinion please you, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἰδὲ δή, ἐάν σοι ὅπερ ἐμοὶ συνδοκῇ look now, in case you approve what I do, [Refs] B.VII.2) with apodosis suppressed for rhetorical reasons, εἴ περ γάρ κ᾽ ἐθέλῃσιν Ὀλύμπιος. στυφελίξαι if he wish to thrust him away, [he will do so], [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ μὲν δώσουσι γέρας—· εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they shall give me a prize, [well and good]; but if they give not, then I will take one for myself, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ ἢν μὲν ξυμβῇ ἡ πεῖρα—· εἰ δὲ μή. and if the attempt succeed, [well]; otherwise, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.VII.3) with the Verb of the protasis omitted, chiefly in the following expressions: B.VII.3.a) εἰ μή except, οὐδὲν ἄλλο σιτέονται, εἰ μὴ ἰχθῦς μοῦνον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὰ τὼ θεώ, εἰ μὴ Κρίτυλλά γ᾽ [εἰμί]—nay, if I'm not Critylla! i.e. I am, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ μὴ ὅσον except only, ἐγὼ μέν μιν οὐκ εἶδον, εἰ μὴ ὅσον γραφῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ μή τι οὖν, ἀλλὰ σμικρόν γέ μοι τῆς ἀρχῆς χάλασον if nothing else, yet, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.VII.3.b) εἰ δὲ μή but if not, i.e. otherwise, προηγόρευε τοῖς Λαμψακηνοῖσι μετιέναι Μιλτιάδεα, εἰ δὲ μή, σφέας πίτυος τρόπον ἀπείλεε ἐκτρίψειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; after μάλιστα μέν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —after a preceding _negative_, μὴ τύπτ᾽· εἰ δὲ μή, σαυτόν ποτ᾽ αἰτιάσει don't beat me; otherwise, you will have yourself to blame, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.VII.3.c) εἰ δέ sometimes stands for εἰ δὲ μή, εἰ μὲν βούλεται, ἑψέτω· εἰ δ᾽, ὅτι βούλεται, τοῦτο ποιείτω [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ δὲ τοῦτο and if so, [Refs 1st c.BC+] B.VII.3.d) εἰ γάρ for if so, [Refs] B.VII.3.e) εἴ τις if any, i. e. as much as or more than any, τῶν γε νῦν αἴ τις ἐπιχθονίων, ὀρθῶς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴ τις ἄλλος, siquis alius, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also κατ᾽ εἰ δέ τινα τρόπον in any way, [Refs] B.VII.3.f) εἴ ποτε or εἴπερ ποτέ now if ever, ἡμῖν δὲ καλῶς, εἴπερ ποτέ, ἔχει. ἡ ξυναλλαγή [Refs 7th c.BC+]; but in prayers, εἴ ποτέ τοι ἐπὶ νηὸν ἔρεψα. τόδε μοι κρήηνον ἐέλδωρ [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.VII.3.g) εἴ ποθεν (i.e. δυνατόν ἐστι) if from any quarter, i.e. from some quarter or other, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so εἴ ποθι somewhere, anywhere, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.VII.3.h) εἴ πως[Refs 5th c.BC+]: in an elliptical sentence (cf. VII. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.VIII) with other PARTICLES: B.VIII.1) for the distinction between καὶ εἰ (or καὶ ἐάν, or κἄν) even if, and εἰ καί (or ἐὰν καί) even though, see at {καί}:—the opposite of καὶ εἰ is οὐδ᾽ εἰ, not even if; that of εἰ καί is εἰ μηδέ, if (although) not even. B.VIII.2) for ὡς εἰ, ὡς εἴ τε, ὥσπερ εἰ, etc, see at {ὡς} and ὥσπερ. B.VIII.3) for εἰ ἄρα, see at {ἄρα}; for εἰ δή, εἴπερ, see at {εἰ δή, εἴπερ}; for εἴ γε, see at {γέ}. B.IX) in negative oaths, = Hebrew im, [LXX+NT] C) IN INDIRECT QUESTIONS, whether, followed by the indicative, subjunctive, or optative, according to the principles of oratio obliqua: C.1) with IN[Refs 4th c.BC+] whether he is a god, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.2) with SUB[Refs 1st c.AD+]subjunctive in the direct question, τὰ ἐκπώματα οὐκ οἶδ᾽ εἰ Χρυσάντᾳ τουτῳῒ δῶ whether I should give them, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.3) OPT. after past tenses, representing either of the two previous constructions in the direct question, ἤρετο εἴ τις ἐμοῦ εἴη σοφώτερος he asked whether any one was wiser than I (direct ἔστι τις σοφώτερο;), [Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist optative for the aorist indicative, ἠρώτων αὐτὸν εἰ ἀναπλεύσειεν I asked him whether he had set sail (direct ἀνέπλευσα;), [Refs 4th c.BC+]aorist optative usually represents aorist subjunctive, τὸν θεὸν ἐπήροντο εἰ παραδοῖεν Κορινθίοις τὴν πόλιν. καὶ τιμωρίαν τινὰ πειρῷντ᾽ ἀπ᾽ αὐτῶν ποιεῖσθαι they asked whether they should deliver their city to the Corinthians, and should try, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —in both constructions the _indicative_ or subjunctive may be retained, ψῆφον ἐβούλοντο ἐπαγαγεῖν εἰ χρὴ πολεμεῖν[Refs]; ἐβουλεύοντο εἴτε κατακαύσωσιν. εἴτε τι ἄλλο χρήσωνται whether they should burn them or should dispose of them in some other way, [Refs]; ἀνακοινοῦσθαι αὐτὸν αὑτῷ εἰ δῷ ἐπιψηφίσαι τοῖς προέδροις [he said that] he consulted him whether he should give, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.4) with OPT. and ἄν when this was the form of the direct question, ἠρώτων εἰ δοῖεν ἂν τούτων τὰ πιστά they asked whether they would give (direct δοιήτε ἄ;), [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.5) the NEG. used with εἰ in indirect questions is οὐ, when οὐ would be used in the direct question, ἐνετέλλετο. εἰρωτᾶν εἰ οὔ τι ἐπαισχύνεται whether he is not ashamed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but if μή would be required in the direct form, it is retained in the indirect, οὐ τοῦτο ἐρωτῶ, ἀλλ᾽ εἰ τοῦ μὲν δικαίου μὴ ἀξιοῖ πλέον ἔχειν μηδὲ βούλεται ὁ δίκαιος, τοῦ δὲ ἀδίκου (the direct question would be μὴ ἀξιοῖ μηδὲ βούλετα; he does not see fit nor wish, does he?) [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—in double indirect questions, εἴτε. εἴτε; εἰ. εἴτε; εἴτε. ἢ, either οὐ or μή can be used in the second clause, ὅπως ἴδῃς εἴτ᾽ ἔνδον εἴτ᾽ οὐκ ἔνδον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ ἀληθὲς ἢ μή, πειράσομαι μαθεῖν[Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοὺς νόμους καταμανθάνειν εἰ καλῶς κεῖνται ἢ μή. τοὺς λόγους εἰ ὀρθῶς ὑμᾶς διδάσκουσιν ἢ οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs > g1487
Word:
εἰ
Transliteration:
ei
Pronounciation:
i
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
if, whether, that, etc.; forasmuch as, if, that, (al-)though, whether; a primary particle of conditionality

had known
Strongs:
Strongs extended:
Lexicon:
εἴδω
Greek:
ᾔδει
Transliteration:
ēdei
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to perceive
Morphhology:
Verb 2nd Pluperfect Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that had happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
know, to perceive, know/understand
Tyndale
Word:
εἴδω
Origin:
a Meaning of g1492H
Transliteration:
eidō
Gloss:
to perceive: know
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
οἶδα, (from same root as εἶδον, which see), [in LXX chiefly for ידע;] pf. with present meaning (plpf. as impf; on irregular tense-forms, see App.), to have seen or perceived, hence, to know, have knowledge of: with accusative of thing(s), Mat.25:13, Mrk.10:19, Jhn.10:4, Rom.7:7, al; with accusative of person(s), Mat.26:72, Jhn.1:31, Act.3:16, al; τ. θεόν, 1Th.4:5, Tit.1:16, al; with accusative and inf, Luk.4:41, al; before ὅτι, Mat.9:6, Luk.20:21, Jhn.3:2, Rom.2:2 11:2, al; before quaest. indir, Mat.26:70, Jhn.9:21, Eph.1:18, al; with inf, to know how (cl.), Mat.7:11, Luk.11:13, Php.4:12, 1Th.4:4, al; in unique sense of respect, appreciate: 1Th.5:12 (but see also ICC on 1Th.4:4). SYN.: see: γινώσκω. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
εἴδω
Origin:
a Meaning of g1492H
Transliteration:
eidō
Gloss:
to perceive: know
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
εἴδω, no active present in use, ὁράω being used:—middle, see.below [Refs 4th c.BC+]: aorist 2 εἶδον always in sense of see (so in present and aorist 1 middle, to be seen, i.e. seem): but perfect οἶδα, in present sense, know. (With ἔ-ϝιδον, compare (ϝ) είδομαι, (ϝ) εῖδος, Latin videre; with (ϝ) οῖδα, cf. Sanskrit véda, Gothic wait, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] wát 'know'.) A) aorist 2 εἶδον (late εἶδα [Refs 5th c.AD+]aorist to ὁράω, Epic dialect ἴδον, iterative ἴδεσκε [Refs 8th c.BC+], late Aeolic dialect εὔιδον [Refs]; imperative ἴδε (in Attic dialect written as adverb ἰδέ, behold! Hdn.Gr.2.23), ἴδετ; subjunctive ἴδω, Epic dialect ἴδωμι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; optative ἴδοιμ; infinitive ἰδεῖν, Epic dialect ἰδέει; participle ἰδών: hence, future ἰδησῶ [Refs 3rd c.BC+] —middle, aorist 2 εἰδόμην, Epic dialect ἰδόμην, in same sense, poetry, Ionic dialect, and later Prose (with genitive, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; imperative ἰδοῦ (frequently written as adverb ἰδού, ={ἰδέ}); subjunctive ἴδωμα; optative ἰδοίμη; infinitive ἰδέσθα; participle ἰδόμενος [Refs 5th c.BC+] 1) see, perceive, behold, ὀφθαλμοῖσι or ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖσι ἰδέσθαι see before the eyes, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄγε, πειρήσομαι ἠδὲ ἴδωμαι well, I will try and see, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; mark, observe, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: frequently in infinitive after substantive or adjective, θαῦμα ἰδέσθαι a marvel to behold, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 1.b) see a person, i.e. meet him, speak with him, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 1.c) see, i.e. experience, νόστιμον ἦμαρ ἰδέσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλόχου κουριδίης. οὔ τι χάριν ἴδε he saw (i.e. enjoyed) not the favour of his wedded wife, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 2) look, ἰδεῖν ἐς. look at or towards, [Refs]; πρός. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰς ὦπα ἰδέσθαι look him in the face, [Refs 8th c.BC+] adverb or adjective, ὑπόδρα ἰδών looking askance, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀχρεῖον ἰδών looking helpless, [Refs]; κέρδος ἰδεῖν look to gain, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 3) see mentally, perceive, ἰδέσθαι ἐν φρεσίν 'to see in his mind's eye', [Refs 8th c.BC+] 3.b) examine, investigate, [Refs]; consider, ἴδωμεν τί λέγομεν [Refs] II) middle, present εἴδομαι, Epic dialect ἐείδεται [Refs 3rd c.BC+], participle ἐειδόμενος [Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist εἰσάμην, Epic dialect participle ἐεισάμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—only Epic dialect and Lyric poetry, to be seen, appear, εἴδεται ἄστρα they are visible, appear,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; perhaps also οὔ πῃ χροὸς εἴσατο none of the skin was visible, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) with infinitive, appear or seem to be, τὸ δέ τοι κὴρ εἴδεται εἶναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with infinitive omitted, οἱ τό γε κέρδιον εἴσατο θυμῷ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also, look like or make a show of, εἴσατ᾽ ἴμεν ἐς Λῆμνον he made a show of going to Lemnos, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἴσατο δ᾽ ὡς ὅτε ῥινόν it had the look as of a shield, [Refs] II.3) strictly middle, with dative, εἴσατο φθογγὴν Πολίτῃ she made herself like Polites in voice, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: especially in participle, like, εἰδομένη κήρυκι [Refs 8th c.BC+] B) perfect, οἶδα I know, used as present: pluperfect ᾔδεα (see. below), I knew, used as imperfect:—perfect οἶδα, Aeolic dialect ὄϊδα [Refs 7th c.BC+]; 2nd pers. singular οἶδας once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἶσθα elsewhere in [Refs 8th c.BC+], Attic dialect, etc; in Comedy texts also sometimes οἶσθας [Refs 5th c.BC+]; plural, ἴσμεν, Epic dialect, Aeolic dialect, and Doric dialect ἴδμεν, also Ionic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἴστε, ἴσασι [ῐς- [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἴδαμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] were formed Doric dialect 1st pers. singular ἴσᾱμι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. singular ἴσατι [Refs]; 1st pers. plural ἴσᾰμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Cretan dialect 3rd.pers. plural subjunctive ἴθθαντι [Refs]; infinitive ϝισάμην[Refs]; participle ἴσας [Refs 5th c.BC+]subjunctive εἰδῶ (εἰδέω, ἰδέω, [Refs 8th c.BC+], Ionic dialect 3rd.pers. plural εἰδέωσι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect also εἴδω [Refs 8th c.BC+], 1st pers. plural εἰδεῖμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: infinitive εἰδέναι, Epic dialect ἴδμεναι, ἴδμεν, also ἰδέμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: participle εἰδώς, εἰδυῖα, Epic dialect also ἰδυῖα, Elean ϝειζώς [Refs]:—pluperfect ᾔδεα [Refs 8th c.BC+], contraction ᾔδη [Refs 8th c.BC+] frequently in codices, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (also later Attic dialect, accusative to [Refs 5th c.BC+] (variant -εις, - ει), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Attic dialect also 1st pers. singular ᾔδειν [Refs 4th c.BC+], 2nd pers. singular ᾔδεις [Refs 5th c.BC+], Ionic dialect ᾐδέατε [LXX+6th c.BC+]; late Epic dialect ᾔδειν, ἠείδειν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural ἴσαν [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—future, in this sense, εἴσομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; infinitive εἰδησέμεν [Refs 8th c.BC+] —The aorist and perfect are usually supplied by γιγνώσκ; aorist 1 infinitive εἰδῆσαι is found in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. plural subjunctive εἰδήσωσιν Herzog Koische Forschungen No.[Refs 2nd c.BC+]:—know, have knowledge of, be acquainted with, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; νοήματα, μήδεα οἶδε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρῶτος ὧν ἡμεῖς ἴδμεν the first we know of, [Refs 5th c.BC+] know well, be assured of this, [Refs 8th c.BC+] adjective, to express character or disposition, ἄγρια οἶδε has fierceness in his heart, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀθεμίστια ᾔδη had law lessness in his heart, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἴ μοι ἤπια εἰδείη if he were kindly disposed towards me, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with genitive, ὃς σάφα θυμῷ εἰδείη τεράων [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τόξων ἐῢ εἰδώς cunning with the bow,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; χάριν εἰδέναι τινί acknowledge a debt to another, thank him,[Refs 5th c.BC+] be Zeus my witness, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect ἴττω Ἡρακλῆς etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]participle εἰδώς, absolutely, one who knows, one acquainted with the fact, ἰδυίῃ πάντ᾽ ἀγορεύω [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also ἰδυίῃσι πραπίδεσσι with knowing mind, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.2) with infinitive, know how to do, οἶδ᾽ ἐπὶ δεξιά, οἶδ᾽ ἐπ᾽ ἀριστερὰ νωμῆσαι βῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also, to be in a condition, be able, have the power, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of drugs, ὅσα λεπτύνειν οἶδε [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of a festival, οἶδε ἐκπέμπουσα δάκνειν Chor.p.124 [Refs 5th c.BC+]; learn, ἵν᾽ εἰδῇ μὴ 'πὶ τοῖς ἐμοῖς κακοῖς ὑψηλὸς εἶναι [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.3) with participle, to know that such and such is the fact, the participle being in nominative when it is a predicate of the Subject of the Verb, ἴσθι μοι δώσων know that thou wilt give, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in accusative when it is predicate of the Object, τοὺς φιλτάτους γὰρ οἶδα νῷν ὄντας πικρούς [Refs 5th c.BC+]participle omitted, γῆν αὐτὰ οἶδεν ἀμφότερα (i.e. ὄντα) [Refs 4th c.AD+] B.4) less frequently c.accusative et infinitive, πλήθους. ἂν σάφ᾽ ἴσθ᾽ ἕκατι βάρβαρον ναυσὶν κρατῆσαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.5) with accusative followed by ὡς, ὅτι, etc, οἶδα κἀμαυτὴν ὅτι ἀλγῶ [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.6) οὐκ οἶδ᾽ εἰ. I know not whether, to express disbelief or doubt, sometimes with ἄν transposed, οὐκ οἶδ᾽ ἂν εἰ πείσαιμί σε [Refs 5th c.BC+] perhaps no other, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.7) in similar ellipses with other Conjunctions, οὐκ οἶδ᾽ ὅπως I know not how, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.8) οἶδα, ἴσθι are frequently parenthetic, οἶδ᾽ ἐγώ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also οἶδ᾽ ὅτι, οἶσθ᾽ ὅτι, ἴσθ᾽ ὅτι, πάρειμι δ᾽ ἄκων οὐχ ἑκοῦσιν, οἶδ᾽ ὅτι (i.e. πάρειμι) I know it well, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἶδ᾽ ὅτι, frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] —οἶσθ᾽ ὅ, οἶσθ᾽ ὡς, with _imperative_, are common in Trag. and Comedy texts, οἶσθ᾽ οὖν ὃ δρᾶσον; do—thou know'st what, i.e. make haste and do, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἶσθ᾽ ὡς πόησο; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also οἶσθ᾽. ὡς νῦν μὴ σφαλῇ; [Refs]; οἶσθα νῦν ἅ μοι γενέσθ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]future, οἶσθ᾽ οὖν ὃ δράσεις (nisileg. δρᾶσον); [Refs]
Strongs > g1492
Word:
εἴδω
Transliteration:
eídō
Pronounciation:
i'-do
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
used only in certain past tenses, the others being borrowed from the equivalent g3700 (ὀπτάνομαι) and g3708 (ὁράω); properly, to see (literally or figuratively); by implication, (in the perfect tense only) to know; be aware, behold, X can (+ not tell), consider, (have) know(-ledge), look (on), perceive, see, be sure, tell, understand, wish, wot; a primary verb

the
Strongs:
Greek:
Transliteration:
ho
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is doing something
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

master of the house
Strongs:
Greek:
οἰκοδεσπότης
Transliteration:
oikodespotēs
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
householder
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
οἰκοδεσπότης
Transliteration:
oikodespotēs
Gloss:
householder
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male
Definition:
οἰκο-δεσπότης, -ου, ὁ (οἶκος, δεσπότης), the master of a house, a householder: Mat.10:25 13:27 20:11 24:43, Mrk.14:14, Luk.12:39 13:25 14:21; ἄνθρωπος οἰ, Mat.13:52 20:1 21:33; pleonast, oἰ. τ. οἰκίας, Luk.22:11 (see Bl, § 81, 4). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οἰκοδεσπότης
Transliteration:
oikodespotēs
Gloss:
householder
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male
Definition:
οἰκοδεσπότ-ης, ου, ὁ, master or steward of a house, [NT+2nd c.AD+]: metaphorically, of God, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] was preferred by the Atticists, as in [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) native ruler, opposed to foreign emperor, [Refs 1st c.AD+] II) Astrology texts, of a planet, owner of a domicile or otherwise predominant, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
οἰκοδεσπότης
Transliteration:
oikodespótēs
Pronounciation:
oy-kod-es-pot'-ace
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
the head of a family; goodman (of the house), householder, master of the house; from g3624 (οἶκος) and g1203 (δεσπότης)

in what
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ποῖος
Greek:
ποίᾳ
Transliteration:
poia
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
what?
Morphhology:
Interrogative pronoun Dative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a question referring to a female person or thing that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ποῖος
Transliteration:
poios
Gloss:
what?
Morphhology:
Greek Interogative
Definition:
ποῖος, -α, -ον interrog. pronom. adj. (corresponding to the demonstr. τοῖος and the relat. οἷος), [in LXX chiefly for זֶה אֵי־;] of what quality or sort: absol, n. pl, Luk.24:19; with subst; (a) prop, in direct questions: Mat.19:18 21:23 22:36 24:42, Mrk.11:28 12:28, Luk.6:32-34, Jhn.10:32, Act.4:7 7:49, Rom.3:27, 1Co.15:35, Jas.4:14 (but see: ποία), 1Pe.2:20; (b) in indirect questions = ὁποῖος : Mat.21:24, 27 24:43, Mrk.11:29, 33, Luk.12:39 20:2, 8, Jhn.12:33 18:32 21:19 Act.23:34, 1Pe.1:11, Rev.3:3; ποῖας (sc. ὁδοῦ), Luk.5:19. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ποῖος
Transliteration:
poios
Gloss:
what?
Morphhology:
Greek Interogative
Definition:
ποῖος, α, ον, Ionic dialect κοῖος, η, ον, of what kind? in [Refs 8th c.BC+] what manner of speech hast thou spoken! [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποῖοί κ᾽ εἶτ᾽ Ὀδυσῆϊ ἀμυνέμεν what sort would ye be to! [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in simple questions, ποίῃ. νηΐ σε ναῦται ἤγαγο; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ποῖος οὐ interrogative, equivalent to every affirmative, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) frequently in Comedy texts and Prose dialogue, used in repeating a word used by the former speaker, to express scornful surprise, Πρωτέως τάδ᾽ ἐστὶ μέλαθρα. Answ. ποίου Πρωτέω; [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) with the Article, when the question implies a Noun which is defined by the Article or the context, τὸ π. εὑρὼν. φάρμακο; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; λέγεις δὲ τὴν π. κατάστασιν ὀλιγαρχία; Answ. τὴν ἀπὸ τιμημάτων πολιτείαν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: frequently with the demonstrative, ὁ ποῖος οὗτος Λάμαχο; Answ. ὁ δεινός, ὁ ταλαύρινος. [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes the answer is given more generally, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so also without the Article, κοῖα ταῦτα λέγει; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; π. Ἐρινὺν τήνδε; what sort of Fury is this that? [Refs 4th c.BC+]; π. ἐρεῖς τόδ᾽ ἔπο; what sort of word is this that thou wilt speak? [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4) ποῖός τι; making the question less definite, κοῖόν μέ τινα νομίζουσι Πέρσαι εἶνα; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) like{ὁποῖος}, in indirect questions, διδάξω. ποῖα χρὴ λέγειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ οἶδα ὁποίᾳ τόλμῃ ἢ ποίοις λόγοις χρώμενος ἐρῶ[Refs 5th c.BC+] III) ={ποδαπός}; ποῖος οὑτοσὶ [ὁ] Τιμόθεο;—Μιλήσιός τις. [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.2) whose? ἐν π. δυνάμει ἢ ἐν π. ὀνόματ; [NT] IV) simply, what, which? especially of place or time, ποίης ἐξ εὔχεται εἶναι γαίη; [NT+8th c.BC+]; ποίᾳ ἄλλῃ (i.e. ὁδῷ); by what other way? [Refs 5th c.BC+] metaphorically, how? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ποίου χρόνο; since what time? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀπὸ ποίου ἔτους [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ποίᾳ ἡμέρ; [NT+4th c.BC+]; φυλᾶς ἑλομένοις ἑκάστου (={-ῳ}) ποίας κε βέλλειτει (ἧστινος ἂν βούληται, i.e. εἶναι) [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ποίας φυλῆς ἐστι [LXX]; π, = quis, [Refs] V) ={πότερος}, [Refs] VI) adverb ποίως Hdn.Gr.2.925, [Refs]. [The first syllable is sometimes short in Trag. and Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ποῖος
Transliteration:
poîos
Pronounciation:
poy'-os
Language:
Greek
Definition:
individualizing interrogative (of character) what sort of, or (of number) which one; what (manner of), which; from the base of g4226 (ποῦ) and g3634 (οἷος)

hour
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ὥρα
Greek:
ὥρᾳ
Transliteration:
hōra
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Noun Dative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ὥρα
Transliteration:
hōra
Gloss:
hour
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
ὥρα, -ας, ἡ, [in LXX chiefly for עֵת and in Da for שָׁעָה;] 1) any time or period fixed by nature, esp. a season (Hom, Hdt, Plat, al.). 2) A part of the day, and esp. a twelfth part of day or night, an hour: Mat.24:36, Mrk.13:32, Act.10:3, al; accus. in ans. to "when"? (M, Pr., 63, 215; Bl, §34, 8), Jhn.4:52, Act.10:3, 30 1Co.15:30, Rev.3:3; accusative of duration, Mat.20:12 26, Mrk.14:37; inexactly, πρὸς ὥραν, for a season, for a time, Jhn.5:35, 2Co.7:8, Gal.2:5; πρὸς καιρὸν ὥρας, for a short season (ICC, in l.), 1Th.2:17. 3) A definite point of time, time, hour: Mat.26:45; with genitive of thing(s), Luk.1:10 14:17, Rev.3:10, al; with genitive of person(s), Luk.22:53, Jhn.2:4 7:30, al; ἡ ἄρτι ὥρα, 1Co.4:11; ἐσχάτη ὥ, 1Jn.2:18; before ὅτε, Jhn.4:21, 23 5:25 16:25; ἵνα, Jhn.12:23, al; with accusative and inf, Rom.13:11 (cf. DB, ext, 475b 476b). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὥρα
Transliteration:
hōra
Gloss:
hour
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
ὥρα, C) Ionic dialect ὥρη, ἡ: Epic dialect genitive plural ὡράων, Ionic dialect ὡρέων: locative plural ὥρασι, (which see) any period, fixed by natural laws and revolutions, whether of the year, month, or day (the sense 'day' is implied in the compound ἑπτάωρος, which see), νυκτός τε ὥραν καὶ μηνὸς καὶ ἐνιαυτοῦ [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.I) in [Refs 8th c.BC+], part of the year, season; mostly in plural, the seasons, ὅτε τέτρατον ἦλθεν ἔτος καὶ ἐπήλυθον ὧραι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ μεταλλάσσουσι αἱ ὧραι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πάσαις ὥραις at all seasons, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χαλεπὴ ὥ. a bad season, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἡ ὥ. αὕτη this season, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κατὰ τὰς ὥρας according to the seasons, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.I.a) spring, ἔαρος. ὥρη [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag. and Attic dialect, ἦρος ὥρα or ὧραι, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.I.b) summer, θέρεος ὥρη [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.I.c) winter, χείματος ὥρη [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χειμῶνος ὥρᾳ in winter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] also names three seasons, [Refs]; an Egyptian division of the year, accusative to [Refs 1st c.BC+]—A fourth first appears in [Refs 7th c.BC+], θέρος καὶ χεῖμα κὠπώραν τρίταν καὶ τέτρατον τὸ ϝῆ; and in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τετράμορφοι ὧραι E.[Refs]: later, seven seasons are named, ἔαρ, θέρος, ὀπώρα, φθινόπωρον, σπορητός, χειμών, φυταλιά [Refs 2nd c.AD+] C.I.2) especially prime of the year, springtime, ὅσα φύλλα καὶ ἄνθεα γίγνεται ὥρῃ [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.I.2.b) in historians, the campaigning season, τὸν τῆς ὥρας εἰς τὸν περίπλουν χρόνον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in the phrase ὥρα ἔτους, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰς ἔτους ὥραν next season, [Refs 1st c.AD+] C.I.3) the year generally, τῆς ὥρης μέσον θέρος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τῇ πέρυσιν ὥρᾳ last year, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; εἰς ὥρας next year, [LXX+5th c.BC+]hereafter, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κἠς ὥρας κἤπειτα next year and for ever, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; compare ὥρασιν. C.I.4) in plural, of the climate of a country, as determined by its seasons, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (here perhaps three harvest seasons); τὰς ὥ. κάλλιστα κεκρημένας [Refs 5th c.BC+]; climatic conditions, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II) time of day, νυκτὸς ἐν ὥρῃ [Refs]; αἱ ὧ. τῆς ἡμέρας the times of day, i.e. morning, noon, evening, and night, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δι᾽ ὥραν ἡμέρας by the time of day (fixed for meetings), [Refs 4th c.BC+] or νυκτός, ἑκάστης ἡμέρας μέχρι τρίτου μέρους ὥρας [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ψευσθεὶς τῆς ὥ. having mistaken the hour, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐποίησαν ἔξω μέσων νυκτῶν τὴν ὥραν, i.e. they prolonged the day beyond midnight, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πολλῆς ὥρας it being late, [NT+2nd c.BC+]; ἄχρι πολλῆς ὥρας till late in the day, [Refs 1st c.BC+] C.II.b) duration, interval or lapse of time, μετὰ ἱκανὴν ὥραν τοῦ κατενεχθῆναι τὸν πέλεκυν ἐξακούεται ἡ τῆς πληγῆς φωνή [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; length of time, term, Ἄρτεμις ἐννέ᾽ ἐτῶν δεκάδας βίον Ἀρτεμιδώρῳ ἔκχρησεν, τρεῖς δ᾽ ὥραι(date.) ἔτι προσέθηκε Προνοίη [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ἐπὶ πολλὴν ὥ. for a long time, [Refs 1st c.AD+] C.II.2) the νυχθήμερον was probably first divided into twenty-four hours by [Refs 2nd c.BC+] (equinoctial hours) ἕκαστον τῶν ἄστρων ἢ δύνει ἢ ἀνατέλλει [Refs 1st c.BC+] C.II.2.b) in ordinary life the day from sunrise to sunset was divided into twelve equal parts called ὧραι (ὧραι καιρικαί when it was necessary to distinguish them from the ὧραι ἰσημεριναί, see at {καιρικός} 2 c), ἡμέρα ἡ. δωδεκάωρος, τουτέστιν ἡ ἀπὸ ἀνατολῆς μέχρι δύσεως [NT+2nd c.AD+]; the time of day was commonly given without the Article, ὥρᾳ ᾱ [Refs 2nd c.AD+], τρίτης ὥρας [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ὀγδόης, ἐνάτης, δεκάτης ὥ, [Refs]; but we have περὶ τὴν τρίτην ὥραν, περὶ τὴν ἑνδεκάτην, [NT+1st c.BC+]; ἐρωτᾷ σε Χαιρήμων δειπνῆσαι. αὔριον, ἥτις ἐστὶν ιε, ἀπὸ ὥρας θ ¯ -to-morrow the 15th at 9 o'clock, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] as we say 'at the eleventh hour', [Refs 1st c.AD+] C.II.2.c) τὰ δυώδεκα μέρεα τῆς ἡμέρης παρὰ Βαβυλωνίων ἔμαθον οἱ Ἕλληνες [Refs 5th c.BC+] ὧραι ἰσημερινα; these double hours (Assyr. kaš-bu) are called ὧραι by [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.III) Astrology texts, degree of the zodiac rising at the nativity compare (ὡρονόμος [Refs 4th c.AD+]; ἐξ ὥρης ἐσορῶν Ζεὺς Ἑρμείην Jupiter in the ascendant in aspect with Mercury, [Refs] B) the fitting time or season for a thing (mostly without Article, even in Attic dialect), frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but with Article, τῆς ὥ. ἐνθυμεῖσθαι [Refs]: frequently in later writers, τῆς ὥρας ἐπιγενομένης [Refs 2nd c.BC+] B.2) with genitive of things, ὥρη κοίτοιο, μύθων, ὕπνου, the time for bed, tale-telling, or sleep, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so εἰς ἀνδρὸς ὥραν ἥκουσα time for a husband, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὥρη ἀρότου, ἀμήτου, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; καρπῶν ὧραι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὥραν εἶχον παιδεύεσθαι I was of age to. [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.3) ὥρα [ἐστίν] with infinitive, it is time to do a thing, ἀλλὰ καὶ ὥρη εὕδειν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so also in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with accusative et infinitive, ὥρα δ᾽ ἐμπόρους καθιέναι ἄγκυραν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with dative et infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in these phrases the infinitive present is almost universal; the aorist, however, occurs in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; and the perfect in ὥρα πεπαῦσθαι [Refs 1st c.AD+]: sometimes the infinitive must be supplied, οὐδέ τί σε χρή, πρὶν ὥρη, καταλέχθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥρα κἠς οἶκον (i. e. ἰέναι εἰς οἶκον) [Refs 3rd c.BC+] B.4) in various adverbial usages, τὴν ὥρην at the right time, [Refs 5th c.BC+] at that hour, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ταύτην τὴν ὥραν at this season, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὥραν οὐδενὸς κοινὴν θεῶν at an hour, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτῆς ὥρας immediately, [Refs 3rd c.AD+]; ἐν ὥρῃ in due season, in good time, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also αἰεὶ εἰς ὥρας in successive seasons, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐς τὰς ὥρας for all time, [Refs 5th c.BC+] hurrah for, [Refs 3rd c.AD+]; οἱ ὧδε χέζοντες εἰς ὥ. μὴ ἔλθοιεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρὶν ὥρας [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) metaphorically, the spring-time of life, the bloom of youth, [Refs 6th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἐνὥ, ={πρεσβύτερος}, [Refs]; παυσαμένου τῆς ὥ. probably in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; λήγειν ὥρας, opposed to ἀνθεῖν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) frequently involving an idea of beauty, φεῦ φεῦ τῆς ὥρας τοῦ κάλλους [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀφ᾽ ὥρας ἐργάζεσθαι quaestum corpore facere, [Refs 1st c.AD+]“Tim.” 14,compare [Refs 5th c.BC+]“Mem.” 1.6.13, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —then, B.II.2.b) generally, beauty, grace, elegance of style, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of beauty in general, χάρις καὶ ὥρα [Refs 1st c.AD+] B.II.3) Ὥρα personified, like{Ἥβη}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) ={τὰ ὡραῖα}, the produce of the season, fruits of the year, ἀπὸ τῆς ὥρας ἐτρέφοντο [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) personified, αἱὯραι, the Hours, keepers of heaven's cloudgate, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; and ministers of the gods,[Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially of Aphrodite, [Refs]; also Ὧ. Διονυσιάδες, Καρνειάδες, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; three in number, Eunomia, Dike, Eirene, daughters of Zeus and Themis, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; worshipped at Athens, [Refs 1st c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ὥρα
Transliteration:
hṓra
Pronounciation:
ho'-rah
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
an "hour" (literally or figuratively); day, hour, instant, season, X short, (even-)tide, (high) time; apparently a primary word

the
Strongs:
Greek:
Transliteration:
ho
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is doing something
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

thief
Strongs:
Greek:
κλέπτης
Transliteration:
kleptēs
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
κλέπτης
Transliteration:
kleptēs
Gloss:
thief
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male
Definition:
κλέπτης, -ου, ὁ [in LXX for גַּנָּב;] a thief: Mat.6:19-20 24:43, Luk.12:33, 39, Jhn.10:1, 10 12:6, 1Co.6:10, 1Pe.4:15. Fig, ὡς κ. ἐν νυκτί, 1Th.5:2 5:4 (κλέπτας, WH, txt, R, mg; see Lft, Notes, 73; but cf. also M, Th., l.with), 2Pe.3:10, Rev.3:3 16:15. Metaphorical, of false teachers, Jhn.10:8. SYN.: λῃστής, a robber, a brigand who plunders, openly, with violence; κ. is a thief who steals in secret, by fraud and cunning (Tr, Syn., § xliv) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
κλέπτης
Transliteration:
kleptēs
Gloss:
thief
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male
Definition:
κλέπτ-ης, ου, ὁ, thief, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; opposed to ἅρπαξ (a robber), [NT+5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ κ. λόγος, a logical fallacy, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 2) generally, cheat, knave, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
κλέπτης
Transliteration:
kléptēs
Pronounciation:
klep'-tace
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a stealer (literally or figuratively); thief; from g2813 (κλέπτω)

is coming,
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ἔρχομαι
Greek:
ἔρχεται,
Transliteration:
erchetai
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to come/go
Morphhology:
Verb Present Middle or Passive Deponent Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happens - by a person or thing being discussed
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἔρχομαι
Transliteration:
erchomai
Gloss:
to come/go
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἔρχομαι, [in LXX very frequently for בּוֹא, also for הלךְ ni, אתה, etc, 34 words in all;] 1) to come; (a) of persons, either as arriving or returning from elsewhere: Mat.8:9, Mrk.6:31, Luk.7:8, Jhn.4:27, Rom.9:9, al; before ἀπό, Mrk.5:35 7:1, Jhn.3:2, al; ἐκ, Luk.5:17, Jhn.3:31, al; εἰς, Mrk.1:29, al; διά before εἰς, Mrk.7:31; ἐν (Cremer, 263f, but see: ἐν), Rom.15:29, 1Co.4:21; ἐπί, with accusative, Mrk.6:53 11:13, Jhn.19:33, al; κατά, with accusative, Luk.10:33 Act.16:7; παρά, with genitive, Luk.8:49; with accusative, Mat.15:29, Mrk.9:14, al; with dative comm, incomm. (M, Pr., 75, 245), Mat.21:5, Rev.2:5, 16; with adverbs: πόθεν, Jhn.3:8, al; ἄνωθεν, Jhn.3:31; ὄπισθεν, Mrk.5:27; ὧδε, Mat.8:29; ἐκεῖ, Jhn.18:3; ποῦ, Heb.11:8; before ἕως, Luk.4:42; ἄχρι, Act.11:5; with purpose expressed by inf, Mrk.5:14, Luk.1:59, al; by fut. ptcp, Mat.27:49; ἵνα, Jhn.12:9; εἰς τοῦτο, ἵνα, Act.9:21; διά, with accusative, Jhn.12:9; before verbs of action, ἔρχεται καί, ἦλθε καί, etc: Mrk.2:18, Jhn.6:15, al; ἔρχου καὶ ἴδε, Jhn.1:47 11:34; ἐλθών (redundant; Dalman, Words, 20 f.), Mat.2:8 8:7, Mrk.7:25, Act.16:39, al; similarly ἐρχόμενος, Luk.15:25, al; of coming into public view: esp. of the Messiah (ὁ ἐρχόμενος, Mat.11:3, al; see Cremer, 264), Luk.3:16, Jhn.4:25; hence, of Jesus, Mat.11:19, Luk.7:34, Jhn.5:43, al; of the second coming, Mat.10:23, Act.1:11, 1Co.4:5, 1Th.5:2, al; (b) of time: ἔρξονται ἡμέραι (present for fut: Bl, §56, 8), Luk.23:29, Heb.8:8 " (LXX); fut, Mat.9:15, Mrk.2:20, al; ἔρξεται ὥρα, ὅτε, Jhn.4:21, 23. al; ἦλθεν, ἐλήλυθε ἡ ὥρα, Jhn.13:1 16:32 17:1; ἡ ἡμέρα τ. κυρίου, 1Th.5:2; καιροί, Act.3:19; (with) of things and events: κατακλυσμός, Luk.17:27; λιμός, Act.7:11; ἡ ὀργή, 1Th.1:10; ὁ λύχνος, Mrk.4:21 (see Swete, in l.). Metaphorical, τ. ἀγαθά, Rom.3:8; τ. τέλειον, 1Co.13:10; ἡ πίστις, Gal.3:23, 25; ἡ ἐντολή, Rom.7:9; with prepositions: ἐκ τ. θλίψεως, Rev.7:14; ἐις τ. χεῖρον, Mrk.5:26; εἰς πειρασμόν, ib. 14:38, al. 2) to go: ὀπίσω, with genitive (Heb. הָלַךְ אַחֲרֵי), Mat.16:24, Mrk.8:34, Luk.9:23; σύν, Jhn.21:3; ὁδόν, Luk.2:44. (Cf. ἀν, ἐπ-αν, ἀπ, δι, εἰς, ἐπ-εἰσ, συν-εἰσ, ἐξ, δι-εξ, ἐπ, κατ, παρ, ἀντι-παρ, περι, προ, προσ, συν-έρχομαι.) SYN.: πορεύομαι, χωρέω (v, Thayer, see word ἔρξομαι). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἔρχομαι
Transliteration:
erchomai
Gloss:
to come/go
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἔρχομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: imperfect ἠρχόμην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in later Prose, [LXX+NT+2nd c.AD+]; in Attic dialect rare even in compounds, ἐπ-ηρχόμην [Refs 5th c.BC+]future ἐλεύσομαι, [Refs 8th c.BC+], Ionic dialect, Trag. [Refs 5th c.BC+], in Attic dialect Prose only in [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist, Epic dialect and Lyric poetry ἤλῠθον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but ἦλθον is more frequently even in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect infinitive ἐλθέμεναι, -έμεν, [Refs 8th c.BC+] unaugmented unless ἐξ-ελύθη [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἦνθον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle ἐνθών [Refs 6th c.BC+]; subjunctive ἔνθῃ [Refs]; Laconian dialect ἔλσῃ, ἔλσοιμι, ἐλσών, [NT+5th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. plural ἤλθοσαν [LXX+2nd c.BC+]; ἤλυθα [Refs 4th c.AD+]perfect ἐλήλῠθα (not in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; syncopated. plural ἐλήλῠμεν, -υτε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect εἰλήλουθα, whence I plural εἰλήλουθμεν [Refs 8th c.BC+], participle εἰληλουθώς [Refs 8th c.BC+], participle κατ-εληλευθυῖα [Refs]; Cretan dialect perfect infinitive ἀμφ-εληλεύθεν, see at {ἀμφέρχομαι}: Boeotian dialect perfect διεσσ-είλθεικε[Refs 3rd c.BC+]participle κατηνθηκότι[Refs 4th c.BC+]: pluperfect ἐληλύθειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ἐληλύθεε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect εἰληλούθει [Refs 8th c.BC+] —In _Attic dialect_ the oblative moods of present, as well as the imperfect and future were replaced by forms of εἶμι ibo (which see): in [Refs]future, aorist, and perfect being supplied as before by ἐλυθ- (ἐλθ-): I) start, set out, ἦ μέν μοι μάλα πολλὰ.Λυκάων ἐρχομένῳ ἐπέτελλε when I was setting out, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τύχησε γὰρ ἐρχομένη νηῦς a ship was just starting, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐς πλόον ἐρχομένοις (variant{ἀρχ-}) [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) walk,= περιπατέω, χαμαὶ ἐρχομένων ἀνθρώπων [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὲ δ᾽ ἐρχόμενον ἐν δίκᾳ πολὺς ὄλβος ἀμφινέμεται walking in justice, [Refs 5th c.BC+]present ἔρχομαι. II) (much more frequently) come or go (the latter especially in Epic dialect and Lyric poetry), ἦλθες thou art come, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χαίροισ᾽ ἔρχεο go and fare thee well, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἶκον ἐλεύσεται[Refs 4th c.BC+]: as a hortatory exclamation, ἀλλ᾽ ἔρχευ, λέκτρονδ᾽ ἴομεν [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) with accusative cognate, ὁδὸν ἐλθέμεναι to go a journey, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; νόστιμον ἐλθεῖν πόδα (variant{δόμον}) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀγγε- λίην, ἐξεσίην ἐλθεῖν, go on an embassy, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.2) with accusative loci, come to, arrive at, rare in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: frequently in later Poets, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; traverse, ὁ ἥλιος ἔρχεται τῆς Λιβύης τὰ ἄνω [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.3) with genitive loci, ἔρχονται πεδίοιο through or across the plain, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but also, from a place, γῆς τινος [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.4) with dative person, come to, i.e. come to aid or relieve one, rare in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in hostile sense, ἔρχομαί σοι [NT] IV) with future participle, to denote the object, ἔρχομαι ἔγχος οίσόμενος I go to fetch, [Refs 8th c.BC+] IV.2) in [Refs 5th c.BC+] I am going to tell, [Refs]; σημανέων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔρχομαι ἐπιχειρῶν -σοι ἐπιδείξασθαι, for ἔ. σοι ἐπιδειξόμενος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV.3) with participle present, aorist, or perfect, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] she came running, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μὴ πεφοβημένος ἔλθῃς lest thou come thither in full flight,[Refs]; ἦλθε φθάμενος he came first,[Refs]; κεχαρισμένος ἔλθυι [Refs 8th c.BC+] IV.4) aor, participle ἐλθών added to Verbs, οὐ δύναμαι.μάχεσθαι ἐλθών go and fight, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κάθηρον ἐλθών come and cleanse,[Refs 5th c.BC+] V) of any kind of motion, ἐξ ἁλὸς ἐλθεῖν to rise out of the sea, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ πόντον to go over it, [Refs]; with qualifying phrase, πόδεσσιν ἔ. to go on foot, [Refs]have come as a foot-soldier, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of birds, [Refs]; of ships, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of spears or javelins, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of natural phenomena, as rivers, [Refs]; wind and storm, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; stars, rise, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of events and conditions, είς ὅ κε γῆρας ἔλθῃ καὶ θάνατος [Refs]; of feelings, go, ἦ κέ μοι αίνὸν ἀπὸ πραπίδων ἄχος ἔλθοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of sounds, etc, τὸν.περὶ φρένας ἤλυθ᾽ ίωή [Refs 8th c.BC+]; without φρένας, περὶ δέ σφεας ἤλυθ᾽ ι>ωή [Refs]; of battle, ὁμόσ᾽ ἦλθε μάχη [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of things sent or taken, ὄφρα κε δῶρα ἐκ κλισίης ἔλθῃσι [Refs]; so later, especially of danger or evil, with dative, εἰ πάλιν ἔλθοι τῇ Ἑλλάδι κίνδυνος ὑπὸ βαρβάρων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of reports, commands, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῖς Ἀθηναίοις ὡς ἦλθε τὰ γεγενημένα came to their ears, [Refs]; τὰ ἐρχόμενα ἐπ᾽ αὐτόν that which was about to happen to him, [NT]; of property, which comes or passes to a person by bequest, conveyance, gift, etc, τὰ ἐληλυθότα εἴς με ἀπὸ κληρονομίας [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ἐ. εἴς τινα ἀπὸ παραχωρήσεως, κατὰ δωρεάν, [Refs 3rd c.AD+]: —Geometry texts, pass, fall, ἔ. ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτὸ σαμεῖον pass through the same point, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ὅπου ἂν ἔρχηται τὸ ἕτερον σαμεῖον wherever the other point falls, [Refs] B) Post-Homeric phrases: B.1) ἐς λόγους ἔρχεσθαί τινι come to speech with, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) εἰς χεῖρας ἐλθεῖν τινι (see. χείρ); so ἐς μάχην ἐλθεῖν τινι [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.3) ἐπὶ μεῖζον ἔ. increase, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ πᾶν ἐλθεῖν try everything, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.4) ἐς τὸ δεινόν, ἐς τὰ ἀλγεινὰ ἐλθεῖν, come into danger, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπ᾽ ἔσχατον ἐλθεῖν ἀηδίας Id [Refs]; ὅσοι ἐνταῦθα ἦλθον ἡλικίας arrived at that time of life, [Refs]; ἐς ἀσθενὲς ἔ. come to an impotent conclusion, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐς ἀριθμὸν ἐλθεῖν to be numbered, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰς ἑαυτὸν ἐλθεῖν come to oneself, [NT+2nd c.AD+] B.5) παρὰ μικρὸν ἐλθεῖν with infinitive, come within a little of, be near a thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παρὰ τοσοῦτον ἡ Μυτιλήνη ἦλθε κινδύνου so narrow was her escape, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.6) with διά and genitive, periphrastic for a Verb, e.g. διὰ μάχης τινὶ ἐλθεῖν for μάχεσθαί τινι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; διὰ πυρὸς ἐλθεῖν τινι rage furiously against, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but οί διὰ πάντων τῶν καλῶν ἐληλυθότες who have gone through the whole circle of duties, have fulfilled them all, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.7) ἔ. παρὰ τὴν γυναῖκα, παρὰ Ἀρίστωνα, of sexual intercourse, go in to her, to him, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρός τινα, of marriage, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.8) ἔ. ἐπὶ πόλιν attack, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.9) ἔ. ἐς depend upon or be concerned with, τό γ᾽ εἰς ἀνθρώπους ἐλθόν [Refs 1st c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἔρχομαι
Transliteration:
érchomai
Pronounciation:
el'-tho
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to come or go (in a great variety of applications, literally and figuratively); accompany, appear, bring, come, enter, fall out, go, grow, X light, X next, pass, resort, be set; middle voice of a primary verb (used only in the present and imperfect tenses, the others being supplied by a kindred (middle voice) , or (active) , which do not otherwise occur)

not
Strongs:
Lexicon:
οὐ
Greek:
οὐκ
Transliteration:
ouk
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Negative Particle Negative Negative
Grammar:
introducing a negative
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek Particle Neuter
Definition:
οὐ, before a vowel with smooth breathing οὐκ, before one with rough breathing οὐχ (but improperly οὐχ ἰδού, Act.2:7, WH, mg; cf. WH, Intr., §409; M, Pr., 44, 244), [in LXX for אֵין,אַיִן,לֹא;] neg. particle, not, no, used generally with indic, and for a denial of fact (cf. μή); 1) absol. (accented), οὔ, no: Mat.13:29 Jhn.1:21 21:5; οὒ οὕ, Mat.5:37 Jas.5:12. 2) Most frequently negativing a verb or other word, Mat.1:25 10:26, 38, Mrk.3:25 9:37, Jhn.8:29, Act.7:5, Rom.1:16, Php.3:3, al; in litotes, οὐκ ὀλίγοι (i.e. very many), Act.17:4, al; οὐκ ἄσημος, Act.21:39; πᾶς. οὐ, with verb, (like Heb. כֹּל. לֹא), no, none, Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, Luk.1:37, Eph.5:5, al; in disjunctive statements, οὐκ. ἀλλά, Luk.8:52 Jhn.1:33 Rom.8:2 o, al; with 2 of person(s) fut. (like Heb. לֹא, with impf.), as emphatic prohibition, Mat.4:7, Luk.4:12, Rom.7:7, al. 3) With another negative, (a) strengthening the negation: Mrk.5:37, Jhn.8:15 12:19, Act.8:39, al; (b) making an affirmative: Act.4:20, 1Co.12:15. 4) With other particles: οὐ μή (see: μή); οὐ μηκέτι, Mat.21:19; with μή interrog, Rom.10:18, 1Co.9:4, 5 11:22. 5) Interrogative, expecting an affirmative answer (Lat. nonne): Mat.6:26, Mrk.4:21, Luk.11:40, Jhn.4:35, Rom.9:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek Particle Neuter
Definition:
οὐ, the negative of fact and statement, as μή of will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. —The same differences hold for all compounds of οὐ and μή, and some examples of οὐδέ and οὐδείς are included below.—As to the Form, see infr. G. USAG[Refs 5th c.BC+] I) as the negative of single words, II) as the negative of the sentence. I) οὐ adhering to single words so as to form a quasi-compound with them:—with Verbs: οὐ δίδωμι withhold, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐκ εἰῶ prevent, [Refs]; οὐκ ἐθέλω refuse, [Refs]; οὔ φημι deny, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but sometimes οὐ is retained, εἰ δ᾽ ἂν. οὐκ ἐθέλωσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐάντε. οὐ (variant{μή}) φῆτε ἐάντε φῆτε [Refs 8th c.BC+] —On the use of οὐ in contrasts, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) as negativing the whole sentence, II.1) οὐ is frequently used alone, sometimes with the ellipsis of a definite Verb, οὔκ (i.e. ἀποκερῇ), ἄν γε ἐμοὶ πείθῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes as negativing the preceding sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] and the accusative; sometimes without μά, οὐ τὸν πάντων θεῶν θεὸν πρόμον Ἅλιον [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) with indicative of statement, τὴν δ᾽ ἐγὼ οὐ λύσω [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ φθίνει Κροίσου φιλόφρων ἀρετά [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.3) with subjunctive in future sense, only in Epic dialect, οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται [Refs] II.4) with optative in potential sense (without ἄν or κεν), also Epic dialect, ὃ οὐ δύο γ᾽ ἄνδρε φέροιεν [Refs] II.5) with optative and ἄν, κείνοισι δ᾽ ἂν οὔ τις. μαχέοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6) in dependent clauses οὐ is used, II.6.a) with ὅτι or ὡς, after Verbs of saying, knowing, and showing, ἐκ μέν τοι ἐρέω. ὡς ἐγὼ οὔ τι ἑκὼν κατερύκομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so with indicative or optative and ἄν, ἀπελογοῦντο ὡς οὐκ ἄν ποτε οὕτω μωροὶ ἦσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] in such sentences, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.b) in all causal sentences, and in temporal and Relat. sentences unless there is conditional or final meaning, χωσαμένη, ὅ οἱ οὔ τι θαλύσια. ῥέξε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in causal relative sentences, οἵτινές σε οὐχὶ ἐσώσαμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in the combinations, οὐκ ἔστιν ὅστις οὐ, as οὐκ ἔστ᾽ ἐραστὴς ὅστις οὐκ ἀεὶ φιλεῖ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδείς ἐστιν ὅστις οὐ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.c) after ὥστε with indicative or optative with ἄν, ὥστ᾽ οὐ δυνατόν σ᾽ εἵργειν ἔσται [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive is almost invariably due to indirect speech, ὥστ᾽ οὐκ αἰσχύνεσθαι (for οὐκ αἰσχύνονται) [Refs 5th c.BC+]—Rarely not in indirect speech, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7) in a conditional clause μή is necessary, except, II.7.a) in [Refs 8th c.BC+] clause precedes the apodosis and the verb is indicative, εἰ δέ μοι οὐκ ἐπέεσσ᾽ ἐπιπείσεται [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.7.b) when the εἰ clause is really causal, as after Verbs expressing surprise or emotion, μὴ θαυμάσῃς, εἰ πολλὰ τῶν εἰρημένων οὐ πρέπει σοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7.c) when οὐ belongs closely to the next word (see. [Refs 4th c.BC+], or is quoted unchanged, εἰ, ὡς νῦν φήσει, οὐ παρεσκευάσατο [Refs 4th c.BC+]; εἰ δ᾽ οὐκέτ᾽ ἐστί (i.e. ὥσπερ λέγεις), τίνι τρόπῳ διεφθάρη ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) οὐ is used with infinitive in indirect speech, when it represents the indicative of orat. recta, φαμὲν δέ οἱ οὐ τελέεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes we have οὐ and μή in consecutive clauses, οἶμαι σοῦ κάκιον οὐδὲν ἂν τούτων κρατύνειν μηδ᾽ ἐπιθύνειν χερί [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9) οὐ is used with the participle, when it can be resolved into a finite sentence with οὐ, as after Verbs of knowing and showing, τὸν κατθανόνθ᾽ ὁρῶντες οὐ τιμώμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a causal sentence, τῶν βαρβάρων οἱ πολλοὶ ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ διεφθάρησαν νέειν οὐκ ἐπιστάμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a concessive sentence, δόξω γυναῖκα καίπερ οὐκ ἔχων ἔχειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] and participle, ὡς οὐχὶ συνδράσουσα νουθετεῖς τάδε [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—for exceptions, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9.b) when the participle is used with the Article, μή is generally used, unless there is a distinct reference to a fact, when οὐ is occasionally found, ἡμεῖς δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς οὐκ οὔσης ἔτι [πόλεως] ὁρμώμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.10) Adjectives and abstract Substantives with the article commonly take μή (see. μή [Refs 5th c.BC+] is occasionally used, τὰς οὐκ ἀναγκαίας πόσεις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν τῶν γεφυρῶν οὐ διάλυσιν the non- dissolution of the bridges, the fact of their notbeing broken up, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so without the article, ἐν οὐ καιπῷ [Refs] II.11) for οὐ μή, see entry II.12) in questions οὐ ordinarily expects a positive answer, οὔ νυ καὶ ἄλλοι ἔασι.; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὁράᾳς.; dost thou not see? [NT+8th c.BC+]: the diphthong is genuine and always written ου (ουκ, ουδε, etc.) in early Inscrr, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; οὐ abbreviated ο, Suid. see at {Φιλοξένου γραμμάτιον}. H) ACCENTUATION. οὐ is oxytone accusative to Hdn.Gr.1.494 (text doubtfulin 504): [Refs 8th c.BC+] H.I) οὐ in connexion with other Particles will be found in alphabetical order, οὐ γάρ, οὐ μή, etc.—The corresponding forms of μή should be compared.
Strongs
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Pronounciation:
ookh
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the absolute negative (compare g3361 (μή)) adverb; no or not; + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but; a primary word

he watched
Strongs:
Lexicon:
γρηγορέω
Greek:
ἐγρηγόρησεν
Transliteration:
egrēgorēsen
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to keep watch
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Source:
Identical in King James and other sources, absent in Nestle/Aland sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
γρηγορέω
Transliteration:
grēgoreō
Gloss:
to keep watch
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
γρηγορέω, -ῶ, = Attic ἐργήγορα, pf. of ἐγείρω, which see, [in LXX (later bks. only) chiefly for שׁקד;] 1) to be awake; metaphorically, of being alive, 1Th.5:10. 2) to watch: Mat.24:43 26:38, 40 Mrk.13:34 14:34, 37 Luk.12:37, 39; metaphorically, Mat.24:42 25:13 26:41, Mrk.13:35, 37 14:38, Act.20:31, 1Co.16:13, 1Th.5:6, 1Pe.5:8, Rev.3:2, 3 16:15; before ἐν, Col.4:2. (Cf. δια-γρηγορέω). SYN.: see: ἀγρθπνέω. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
γρηγορέω
Transliteration:
grēgoreō
Gloss:
to keep watch
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
γρηγορ-έω, late present, formed from perfect ἐγρήγορα (which see), to be or become fully awake, watch, [LXX+NT+3rd c.AD+]; ἐπὶ τὰς πόλεις[LXX]passive, ἐγρηγορήθη ἐπὶ τὰ ἀσεβήματά μου[LXX]; opposed to καθεύδω, of life opposed to death, [NT]
Strongs
Word:
γρηγορεύω
Transliteration:
grēgoreúō
Pronounciation:
gray-gor-yoo'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to keep awake, i.e. watch (literally or figuratively); be vigilant, wake, (be) watch(-ful); from g1453 (ἐγείρω)

maybe
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ἄν
Greek:
ἂν
Transliteration:
an
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Particle or Disjunctive Particle
Grammar:
introducing an alternative
Source:
Identical in King James sources, absent in Nestle/Aland and other sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, conditional particle, which cannot usually be separately translated in English, its force depending on the constructions which contain it (see further, LS, see word; WM, §xlii; M, Pr., 165 ff; MM, VGT, see word). 1) In apodosis, (i) with indic, imperfect or aor, expressing what would be or would have been if (εἰ with impf, aor. or plpf.) some condition were or had been fulfilled: Luk.7:39 17:6, Jhn.5:46, Gal.1:10, Mat.12:7 24:43, 1Co.2:8, Act.18:14, 1Jn.2:19, al. The protasis is sometimes understood (as also in cl.): Mat.25:27, Luk.19:23. In hypothetical sentences, expressing unreality, ἄν (as often in late writers, more rarely in cl.) is omitted: Jhn.8:39 15:24 19:11, Rom.7:7, Gal.4:15; (ii) with opt, inf, ptcp. (cl; see LS, see word; M, Int., §275; M, Pr., 167:4). 2) In combination with conditional, relative, temporal, and final words; (i) as in cl, with subj, (a) in protasis with εἰ, in Attic contr. ἐάν, which see; (b) in conditional, relative, and temporal clauses (coalescing with ὅτε, ἐπεί, etc; see: ὅταν, ἐπάν, etc.), ever, soever; (α) with pres, ἡνίκα, 2Co.3:15; ὃς ἄν, Rom.9:15 (LXX) 16:2, al; ὅσοι ἄν, Luk.9:5; ὡς ἄν, Rom.15:24 (M, Pr., 167); (β) with aor, ὃς ἄν, Mat.5:21, 22, 31; ἕως ἄν, until, Mat.2:13, Mrk.6:10, al; ὡς ἄν, as soon as (M, Pr., 167), 1Co.11:34, Php.2:23. On the frequently use of ἐάν for ἄν with the foregoing words, see: ἐάν; (ii) in late Gk, when some actual fact is spoken of, with indic: ὅταν (which see); ὅπου ἄν, Mrk.6:56 (M, Pr., 168); καθότι ἄν, Act.2:45 4:35; ὡς ἄν, 1Co.12:2. 3) in iterative construction, with imperfect and aor. indic. (M, Pr., 167): Act.2:45 4:35, 1Co.12:2. 4) with optative, giving a potential sense to a question or wish: Act.8:31 26:29. 5) Elliptical constructions: εἰ μή τι ἄν (M, Pr., 169), 1Co.7:5; ὡς ἄν, with inf, as it were (op. cit. 167), 2Co.10:9. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, [ᾰ], Epic dialect, Lyric poetry, Ionic dialect, [Refs 4th c.AD+], Attic dialect; also κεν) Epic dialect, Aeolic dialect, Thess, κᾱ Doric dialect, Boeotian dialect, El; the two combined in Epic dialect (below [Refs 4th c.BC+], εἰκ ἄν[Refs 4th c.BC+]:—modal Particle used with Verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] κε is four times as common as ἄν, in Lyric poetry about equally common. No clear distinction can be traced, but κε as an enclitic is somewhat less emphatic; ἄν is preferred by [Refs 8th c.BC+] in negative clauses, κε (ν) with the relative. A) In Simple Sentences, and in the Apodosis of Compound Sentences; here ἄν belongs to the Verb, and denotes that the assertion made by the Verb is dependent on a condition, expressed or implied: thus ἦλθεν he came, ἦλθεν ἄν he would have come (under conditions, which may or may not be defined), and so he might have come; ἔλθοι may he come, ἔλθοι ἄν he would come (under certain conditions), and so he might come. A.I) WITH INDICATIVE: A.I.1) with historical tenses, generally imperfect and aorist, less frequently pluperfect, never perfect, see below, A.I.1.a) most frequently in apodosis of conditional sentences, with protasis implying nonfulfilment of a past or present condition, and apodosis expressing what would be or would have been the case if the condition were or had been fulfilled. The imperfect with ἄν refers to continued action, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in past time, except perhaps καί κε θάμ᾽ ἐνθάδ᾽ ἐόντες ἐμισγόμεθ᾽[Refs 8th c.BC+]; later also in present time, first in [Refs 6th c.BC+]; πολὺ ἂν θαυμαστότερον ἦν, εἰ ἐτιμῶντο it would be far more strange if they were honoured, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν νήσων ἐκράτει, εἰ μή τι καὶ ναυτικὸν εἶχεν he would not have been master of islands if he had not had also some naval power, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. The aorist strictly refers only to past time, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ τότε ταύτην ἔσχε τὴν γνώμην, οὐδὲν ἂν ὧν νυνὶ πεποίηκεν ἔπραξεν if he had then come to this opinion, he would have accomplished nothing of what he has now done, [Refs 4th c.BC+], but is used idiomatically with Verbs of saying, answering, etc, as we say I should have said, εἰ μὴ πατὴρ ἦσθ᾽, εἶπον ἄν σ᾽ οὐκ εὖ φρονεῖν[Refs 5th c.BC+]pluperfect refers to completed actions, as ὃ εἰ ἀπεκρίνω, ἱκανῶς ἂν ἤδη παρὰ σοῦ τὴν ὁσιότητα ἐμεμαθήκη I should have already learnt,[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.b) the protasis is frequently understood: ὑπό κεν ταλασίφρονά περ δέος εἷλεν fear would have seized even the stout-hearted (had he heard the sound), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸ γὰρ ἔρυμα τῷ στρατοπέδῳ οὐκ ἂν ἐτειχίσαντο they would not have built the wall (if they had not won a battle), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πολλοῦ γὰρ ἂν ἦν ἄξια for (if that were so) they would be worth much, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν ὅ τι ἂν ἐποιεῖτε for there was nothing which you could have done, i. e. would have done (if you had tried), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.I.1.c) with no definite protasis understood, to express what would have been likely to happen, or might have happened in past time: ἢ γάρ μιν ζωόν γε κιχήσεαι, ἤ κεν Ὀρέστης κτεῖνεν ὑποφθάμενος for either you will find him alive, or else Orestes may already have killed him before you, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ θεασάμενος πᾶς ἄν τις ἀνὴρ ἠράσθη δάϊος εἶναι every man who saw this (the 'Seven against Thebes') would have longed to be a warrior, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially with τάχα, which see, ἀλλ᾽ ἦλθε μὲν δὴ τοῦτο τοὔνειδος τάχ᾽ ἂν ὀργῇ βιασθὲν μᾶλλον ἢ γνώμῃ φρενῶν, i. e. it might perhaps have come, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τάχα ἂν δὲ καὶ ἄλλως πως ἐσπλεύσαντες (i.e. διέβησαν) and they might also perhaps have crossed by sea (to Sicily) in some other way, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.d) ἄν is frequently omitted in apodosi with Verbs expressing obligation, propriety, or possibility, as ἔδει, ἐχρῆν, εἰκὸς ἦν, etc, and sometimes for rhetorical effect, εἰ μὴ. ᾖσμεν, φόβον παρέσχεν it had caused (for it would have caused) fear, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2) with future indicative: A.I.2.a) frequently in Epic dialect, usually with κεν, rarely ἄν, [Refs 8th c.BC+] and he will likely be angry to whom-soever I shall come, [Refs]; καί κέ τις ὧδ᾽ ἐρέει and in that case men will say,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Lyric poetry, μαθὼν δέ τις ἂν ἐρεῖ[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2.b) rarely in codices of Attic dialect Prose writers, σαφὲς ἂν καταστήσετε[Refs 5th c.BC+]future infinitive and participle see below A.II) WITH SUBJUNCTIVE, only in Epic dialect, the meaning being the same as with the future indicative [Refs]I will take her myself, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πείθευ, ἐγὼ δέ κέ τοι εἰδέω χάριν obey and if so I will be grateful, [Refs]; also with other persons, giving emphasis to the future, οὐκ ἄν τοι χραίσμῃ κίθαρις[Refs] A.III) WITH OPTATIVE (never future, rarely perfect πῶς ἂν λελήθοι [με]; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.a) in apodosis of conditional sentences, after protasis in optative with εἰ or some other conditional or relative word, expressing a future condition: ἀλλ᾽ εἴ μοί τι πίθοιο, τό κεν πολὺ κέρδιον εἴη[Refs 8th c.BC+] present and aorist optative with κε or ἄν are sometimes used like imperfect and aorist indicative with ἄν in Attic, with either regular indicative or another optative in the protasis: καί νύ κεν ἔνθ᾽ ἀπόλοιτο. εἰ μὴ. νόησε κτλ, i. e. he would have perished, had she not perceived, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ νῦν ἐπὶ ἄλλῳ ἀεθλεύοιμεν, ἦ τ᾽ ἂν ἐγὼ. κλισίηνδε φεροίμην if we were now contending in another's honour, I should now carry, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.b) with protasis in present or future, the optative with ἄν in apodosi takes a simply future sense: φρούριον δ᾽ εἰ ποιήσονται, τῆς μὲν γῆς βλάπτοιεν ἄν τι μέρος they might perhaps damage, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.c) with protasis understood: φεύγωμεν· ἔτι γάρ κεν ἀλύξαιμεν κακὸν ἦμαρ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὔτε ἐσθίουσι πλείω ἢ δύνανται φέρειν· διαρραγεῖεν γὰρ ἄν for (if they should do so) they would burst, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν δ᾽ οὔ κε δύ᾽ ἀνέρε. ἀπ᾽ οὔδεος ὀχλίσσειαν two men could not heave the stone from the ground, i. e. would not, if they should try, [Refs 8th c.BC+] sometimes with reference to past time, Τυδεΐδην οὐκ ἂν γνοίης ποτέροισι μετείη[Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III.d) with no definite protasis implied, in potential sense: ἡδέως δ᾽ ἂν ἐροίμην Λεπτίνην but I would gladly ask Leptines, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; βουλοίμην ἄν I should like, Latin velim (but ἐβουλόμην ἄν I should wish, if it were of any avail, vellem); ποῖ οὖν τραποίμεθ᾽ ἄ; which way then can we turn? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν μεθείμην τοῦ θρόνου I will not give up the throne, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; idiomatically, referring to the past, αὗται δὲ οὐκ ἂν πολλαὶ εἶεν but these would not (on investigation) prove to be many, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴησαν δ᾽ ἂν οὗτοι Κρῆτες these would be (i. e. would have been) Cretans, [Refs 5th c.BC+] i.e. it would not prove to be, etc. (for, it is not, etc.), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.e) in questions, expressing a wish: τίς ἂν θεῶν. δοί;[Refs 5th c.BC+] as a mild command, exhortation, or entreaty, τλαίης κεν Μενελάῳ ἐπιπροέμεν ταχὺν ἰόν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὺ μὲν κομίζοις ἂν σεαυτὸν ᾗ θέλεις you may take yourself off (milder than κόμιζε σεαυτόν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χωροῖς ἂν εἴσω you may go in, [Refs]; φράζοις ἄν, λέγοις ἄν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.f) in a protasis which is also an apodosis: εἴπερ ἄλλῳ τῳ ἀνθρώπων πειθοίμην ἄν, καὶ σοὶ πείθομαι if I would trust any (other) man (if he gave me his word), I trust you, [Refs]; εἰ μὴ ποιήσαιτ᾽ ἂν τοῦτο if you would not do this (if you could), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.g) rarely omitted with optative in apodosis: ῥεῖα θεός γ᾽ ἐθέλων καὶ τηλόθεν ἄνδρα σαώσαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in Trag, θᾶσσον ἢ λέγοι τις[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.h) ἄν with future optative is probably always corrupt (compare [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰδὼς ὅτι οὐδέν᾽ ἂν καταλήψοιτο (οὐδένα Bekk.) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV) WITH infinitive and participle (sometimes adjective equivalent to participle, τῶν δυνατῶν ἂν κρῖναι[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1) present infinitive or participle: A.IV.1.a) representing imperfect indicative, οἴεσθε τὸν πατέρα. οὐκ ἂν φυλάττει; do you think he would not have kept them safe? (οὐκ ἂν ἐφύλαττεν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδυνάτων ἂν ὄντων [ὑμῶν] ἐπιβοηθεῖν when you would have been unable, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1.b) representing present optative, πόλλ᾽ ἂν ἔχων (representing ἔχοιμ᾽ ἄν) ἕτερ᾽ εἰπεῖν παραλείπω[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2) aorist infinitive or participle: A.IV.2.a) representing aorist indicative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγεῖσθ᾽ αὐτὸν κἂν ἐπιδραμεῖ; do you not think he would even have run thither? (καὶ ἐπέδραμεν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἴσμεν ὑμᾶς ἀναγκασθέντας ἄν we know you would have been compelled, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ῥᾳδίως ἂν ἀφεθείς when he might easily have been acquitted, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2.b) representing aorist optative, οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατῆσαι αὐτοὺς τῆς γῆς ἡγοῦμαι I think they would not even be masters of the land (οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατήσειαν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁρῶν ῥᾳδίως ἂν αὐτὸ ληφθέν (ληφθείη ἄν) [Refs]; οὔτε ὄντα οὔτε ἂν γενόμενα, i.e. things which are not and never could happen (ἃ οὔτε ἂν γένοιτο), [Refs] A.IV.3) perfect infinitive or participle representing: A.IV.3.a) pluperfect indicative, πάντα ταῦθ᾽ ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων ἂν ἑαλωκέναι (φήσειεν ἄν) he would say that all these would have been destroyed by the barbarians (ἑαλώκη ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.IV.3.b) perfect optative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγοῦμαι αὐτοὺς δίκην ἀξίαν δεδωκέναι, εἰ. καταψηφίσαισθε I do not believe they would (then) have suffered (δεδωκότες ἂν εἶεν) punishment enough, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.4) future infinitive or participle, never in Epic dialect, and probably always corrupt in Attic dialect, νομίζων μέγιστον ἂν σφᾶς ὠφελήσειν (to be read -ῆσαι) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle is still more exceptional, ὡς ἐμοῦ οὐκ ἂν ποιήσοντος ἄλλα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; both are found in later Gk, νομίσαντες ἂν οἰκήσειν οὕτως ἄριστα[Refs 2nd c.BC+]; with participle, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B) IN DEPENDENT CLAUSE[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I) In the protasis of conditional sentences with εἰ, regularly with the subjunctive. In Attic εἰ ἄν is contracted into ἐάν, ἤν, or ἄν (ᾱ) (which see): [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἢν ἐγγὺς ἔλθῃ θάνατος, οὐδεὶς βούλεται θνῄσκειν if death (ever) come near, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in relative or temporal clauses with a conditional force; here ἄν coalesces with ὅτε, ὁπότε, ἐπεί, ἐπειδή, compare ὅταν, ὁπόταν, ἐπήν or ἐπάν (Ionic dialect ἐπεάν), ἐπειδάν: [Refs 8th c.BC+], ἐπήν, εὖτ᾽ ἄ; see also εἰσόκε (εἰς ὅ κε):—τάων ἥν κ᾽ ἐθέλωμι φίλην ποιήσομ᾽ ἄκοιτιν whomsoever of these I may wish, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὅταν δὴ μὴ σθένω, πεπαύσομαι when I shall have no strength, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐχθρὸς γάρ μοι κεῖνος. ὅς χ᾽ ἕτερον μὲν κεύθῃ ἐνὶ φρεσίν, ἄλλο δὲ εἴπῃ whoever conceals one thing in his mind and speaks another, [Refs 8th c.BC+]subjunctive in both the above constructions [Refs] without ἄ; also Trag. and Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μέχρι and πρίν occasionally take subjunctive without ἄν in prose, e.g. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μέχρι οὗ), [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) in final clauses introduced by relative adverbs, as ὡς, ὅπως (of Manner), ἵνα (of Place), ὄφρα, ἕως, etc. (of Time), frequently in Epic dialect, σαώτερος ὥς κε νέηαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also after ὡς in [Refs 5th c.BC+] indicative is regular in _Attic dialect_); ἵνα final does not take ἄν or κε except ἵνα εἰδότες ἤ κε θάνωμεν ἤ κεν. φύγοιμεν[Refs 8th c.BC+] = where in [Refs 5th c.BC+] = lest, takes ἄν only with optative in apodosis, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) in Epic dialect sometimes with OPTATIVE as with subjunctive (always κε (ν), except εἴ περ ἂν αὐταὶ Μοῦσαι ἀείδοιεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥς κε. δοίη ᾧ κ᾽ ἐθέλοι that he might give her to whomsoever he might please,[Refs 8th c.BC+] belongs to Verb in apodosis, as in ὡς δ᾽ ἂν ἥδιστα ταῦτα φαίνοιτο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) rarely in oratio obliqua, where a relative or temporary word retains an ἄν which it would have with subjunctive in direct form, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—similarly after a preceding optative, οὐκ ἀποκρίναιο ἕως ἂν. σκέψαιο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) rarely with εἰ and INDICATIVE in protasis, only in Epic dialect: B.III.1) with future indicative as with subjunctive: αἴ κεν Ἰλίου πεφιδήσεται[Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.2) with εἰ and a past tense of indicative, once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so Ζεὺς γάρ κ᾽ ἔθηκε νῆσον εἴ κ᾽ ἐβούλετο Oracle texts cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) in later Greek, ἄν with relative words is used with INDICATIVE in all tenses, as ὅπου ἂν εἰσεπορεύετο[NT+4th c.AD+]; ἔνθ᾽ ἂν πέφυκεν ἡ ὁλότης εἶναι[Refs 6th c.AD+]; compare ἐάν, ὅταν. C) with imperfect and more rarely aorist indicative in ITERATIVE construction, to express elliptically a condilion fulfilled whenever an opportumty offered; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] she would (i. e. used to) weep and lament, 3.119; εἶτα πῦρ ἂν οὐ παρῆν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴ τινες ἴδοιεν, ἀνεθάρσησαν ἄν whenever they saw it, on each occasion, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive representing imperfect of this construction, ἀκούω Λακεδαιμονίους τότε ἐμβαλόντας ἂν. ἀναχωρεῖν, i. e. I hear they used to retire (ἀνεχώρουν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D) GENERAL REMARKS: D.I) POSITION OF ἄν. D.I.1) in A, when ἄν does not coalesce with the relative word (as in ἐάν, ὅταν), it follows directly or is separated only by other particles, as μέν, δέ, τε, γάρ, καί, νυ, περ, etc; as εἰ μέν κεν. εἰ δέ κε[Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely by τις, as ὅποι τις ἄν, οἶμαι, προσθῇ[Refs 8th c.BC+] two such Particles may precede κε, as εἴ περ γάρ κεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ γάρ τίς κε, ὃς μὲν γάρ κε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely in Prose, ὅποι μὲν γὰρ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.2) in apodosis, ἄν may stand either next to its Verb (before or after it), or after some other emphatic word, especially an interrogative, a negative (e. g. οὐδ᾽ ἂν εἷς, οὐκ ἂν ἔτι, etc.), or an important Adjective or Adverb; also after a participle which represents the protasis, λέγοντος ἄν τινος πιστεῦσαι οἴεσθ; do you think they would have believed it if any one had told them? (εἴ τις ἔλεγεν, ἐπίστευσαν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D.I.3) ἄν is frequently separated from its infinitive by such Verbs as οἴομαι, δοκέω, φημί, οἶδα, etc, οὐκ ἂν οἴει; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ νῦν ἡδέως ἄν μοι δοκῶ κοινωνῆσαι I think that I should, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μήτε προῄδει μηδεὶς μήτ᾽ ἂν ᾠήθη τήμερον ῥηθῆναι (where ἄν belongs to ῥηθῆναι) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.4) ἄν never begins a sentence, or even a clause after a comma, but may stand first after a parenthetic clause, ἀλλ᾽, ὦ μέλ᾽, ἄν μοι σιτίων διπλῶν ἔδει[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II) REPETITION OF ἄν:—in apodosis ἄν may be used twice or even three times with the same Verb, either to make the condition felt throughout a long sentence, or to emphasize certain words, ὥστ᾽ ἄν, εἰ σθένος λάβοιμι, δηλώσαιμ᾽ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; attached to a parenthetical phrase, ἔδρασ᾽ ἄν, εὖ τοῦτ᾽ ἴσθ᾽ ἄν, εἰ. [Refs] D.II.2) ἄν is coupled with κε (ν) a few times in [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.III) ELLIPSIS OF VERB:—sometimes the Verb to which ἄν belongs must be supplied, in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὐκ ἂν πρὸ τοῦ (i.e. ἔρρεγκον) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἂν δοκεῖ σοι Πρίαμος (i.e. πρᾶξαι), εἰ τάδ᾽ ἤνυσε;[Refs 4th c.BC+] —so in phrases like{πῶς γὰρ ἄν}; and πῶς οὐκ ἄν (i.e. εἴη); also in ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ (or ὡσπερανεί), as φοβούμενος ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ παῖς (i. e. ὥσπερ ἂν ἐφοβήθη εἰ παῖς ἦν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so τοσοῦτον ἐφρόνησαν, ὅσον περ ἂν (i.e. ἐφρόνησαν) εἰ.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare κἄν:—so the Verb of a protasis containing ἄν may be understood, ὅποι τις ἂν προσθῇ, κἂν μικρὰν δύναμιν (i. e. καὶ ἐὰν προσθῇ) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐμοῦ οὖν ἰόντος ὅπῃ ἂν καὶ ὑμεῖς (i.e. ἴητε) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.IV) ELLIPSIS OF ἄν:—when an apodosis consists of several co-ordinate clauses, ἄν is generally used only in the first and understood in the others: πείθοι᾽ ἂν εἰ πείθοι᾽· ἀπειθοίης δ᾽ ἴσως[Refs 4th c.BC+]: even when the construction is continued in a new sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is repeated for the sake of clearness or emphasis,[Refs 5th c.BC+] B) ἄν, [ᾱ], Attic dialect, ={ἐάν},{ἤν}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ[Refs 4th c.BC+]: not common in earlier Attic dialect Inscrr, [NT+4th c.BC+] C) ἄν or ἀν, Epic form of ἀνά, (which see) D) ἄν, shortened from ἄνα, see entry ἀνά G.
Strongs
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
án
Pronounciation:
an
Language:
Greek
Definition:
(what-, where-, wither-, who-)soever; a primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty

and
Strongs:
Lexicon:
καί
Greek:
καὶ
Transliteration:
kai
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Source:
Identical in King James and other sources, absent in Nestle/Aland sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
καί
Transliteration:
kai
Gloss:
and
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
καί, conj., and I. Copulative. 1) Connecting single words; (a) in general: Mat.2:18, 16:1, Mrk.2:15, Luk.8:15, Heb.1:1, al. mult; repeated before each of the terms in a series, Mat.23:23, Luk.14:21, Rom.7:12, 9:4, al. (b) connecting numerals (WM, §37, 4): Jhn.2:20, Act.13:20; (with) joining terms which are not mutually exclusive, as the part with the whole: Mat.8:33, 26:59, Mrk.16:17, Act.5:29, al. 2) Connecting clauses and sentences: Mat.3:12, Act.5:21, al. mult; esp. (a) where, after the simplicity of the popular language, sentences are paratactically joined (WM, §60, 3; M, Pr., 12; Deiss, LAE, 128ff.): Mat.1:21, 7:25, Mrk.9:5, Jhn.10:3, al; (b) joining affirmative to negative sentences: Luk.3:14, Jhn.4:11, IIIJhn.10; (with) consecutive, and so: Mat.5:1, 23:32, Heb.3:19, al; after imperatives, Mat.4:19, Luk.7:7, al; (d) = καίτοι, and yet: Mat.3:14, 6:26, Mrk.12:12, Luk.18:7 (Field, Notes, 72), 1Co.5:2, al; (e) beginning an apodosis (= Heb. וְ; so sometimes δέ in cl.), then: Luk.2:21, 7:12, Act.1:10; beginning a question (WM, §53, 3a): Mrk.10:26, Luk.10:29, Jhn.9:36. 3) Epexegetic, and, and indeed, namely (WM, §53, 3c): Luk.3:18, Jhn.1:16, Act.23:6, Rom.1:5, 1Co.3:5, al. 4) In transition: Mat.4:23, Mrk.5:1, 21, Jhn.1:19, al; so, Hebraistically, καὶ ἐγένετο (וַי:הִי; also ἐγένετο δέ), Mrk.1:9 (cf. Luk.5:1; V. Burton, §§357-60; M, Pr., 14, 16). 5) καὶ. καί, both. and (for τε. καί, see: τε); (a) connecting single words: Mat.10:28, Mrk.4:41, Rom.11:33, al; (b) clauses and sentences: Mrk.9:13, Jhn.7:28, 1Co.1:22, al. II. Adjunctive, also, even, still: Mat.5:39, 40; Mrk.2:28, al. mult; esp. with pron, adv, etc, Mat.20:4, Jhn.7:47, al; ὡς κ, Act.11:17; καθὼς κ, Rom.15:7; οὑτω κ, Rom.6:11; διὸ κ, Luk.1:35; ὁ κ. (Deiss, BS, 313ff.), Act.13:9; pleonastically, μετὰ κ. (Bl, §77, 7; Deiss, BS, 265f,), Php.4:3; τί κ, 1 Co 15:29; ἀλλὰ κ, Luk.14:22, Jhn.5:18, al; καίγε (M, Pr., 230; Burton, §437), Act.17:27; καίπερ, Heb.5:8; κ. ἐάν, see: ἐάν. ἐάν, contr. fr. εἰ ἄν, conditional particle, representing something as "under certain circumstances actual or liable to happen," but not so definitely expected as in the case of εἰ with ind. (Bl, §65, 4; cf. Jhn.13:17, 1Co.7:36), if haply, if; 1) with subjc. (cl.); (a) pres: Mat.6:22, Luk.10:6, Jhn.7:17, Rom.2:25, 26 al; { (b) aor. (= Lat. fut. pf.): Mat.4:9 16:26 (cf. ptcp. in Luk.9:25; M, Pr., 230), Mrk.3:24, Luk.14:34, Jhn.5:43, Rom.7:2, al; = cl. εἰ, with opt, Jhn.9:22 11:57, Act.9:2; as Heb. אִם = ὅταν, Jhn.12:32 14:3, I Jhn.2:28 3:2, Heb.3:7 " (LXX). 2) C. indic, (as in late writers, fr. Arist. on; see WH, App., 171; VD, MGr. 2, App., §77; Deiss, BS, 201f, LAE, 155, 254; M, Pr., 168, 187; Bl, §65, 4); (a) fut: Mat.18:19 T, Luk.19:40, Act.7:7; (b) pres: 1Th.3:8 (see Milligan, in l.). 3) With other particles: ἐ. καί (Bl, §65, 6), Gal.6:1; ἐ. μή (M, Pr., 185, 187; Bl, l.with), with subjc. pres, Mat.10:13, 1Co.8:8, Jas.2:17, 1Jn.3:21; aor, Mat.6:15, Mrk.3:27, Jhn.3:3, Rom.10:15, Gal.1:8 2:16 (see Lft, Ellic, in ll.); ἐ. τε. ἐ. τε, [in LXX for אִם. אִם, Est.19:13, al,] Rom.14:8. 4) = cl. ἄν (which see) after relat. pronouns and adverbs (Tdf, Pr., 96; WH, App., 173; M, Pr., 42f; Bl, §26, 4; Mayser, 152f; Deiss, BS, 202ff.): ὃς ἐ, Mat.5:19, Mrk.6:22, 23 Luk.17:32, 1Co.6:18, al; ὅπου ἐ, Mat.8:19; ὁσάκις ἐ, Rev.11:6; οὗ ἐ, 1Co.16:6; καθὸ ἐ, 2Co.8:12; ὅστις ἐ, Gal.5:10. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
καί
Transliteration:
kai
Gloss:
and
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
καί, conjunction, copulative, joining words and sentences, A) and; also adverb, even, also, just, frequently expressing emphatic assertion or assent, corresponding as positive to the negative οὐ (μή) or οὐδέ (μηδέ). copulative, and, A.I) joining words or sentences to those preceding, ἦ, καὶ κυανέῃσιν ἐπ᾽ ὀφρύσινεῦσε Κρονίων [Refs 8th c.BC+]: repeated with two or more Nouns, αἱ δὲ ἔλαφοι κ. δορκάδες κ. οἱ ἄγριοι οἶες κ. οἱ ὄνοι οἱ ἄγριοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; joining only the last pair, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ ὄχλος πλείων κ. πλείων ἐπέρρει more and more, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; to add epithets after πολύς, πολλὰ κ. ἐσθλά [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.I.2) to addalimiting or defining expression, πρὸς μακρὸν ὄρος κ. Κύνθιον ὄχθον to the mountain and specially to, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (sometimes in reverse order, πρὸς δῶμα Διὸς κ. μακρὸν Ὄλυμπον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; to add by way of climax, θεῶν. κ. Ποσειδῶνος all the gods, and above all. , [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently ἄλλοι τε καί, ἄλλως τε καί, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs]; ὀλίγου τινὸς ἄξια κ. οὐδενός little or nothing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. ταῦτα and this too. , γελᾶν ἀναπείθειν, κ. ταῦθ᾽ οὕτω πολέμιον ὄντα τῷ γέλωτι [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II) at the beginning of a sentence, A.II.1) in appeals or requests, καί μοι δὸς τὴν Χεῖρα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; καί μοι λέγε, καί μοι ἀπόκριναι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in Oratt, καί μοι λέγε. τὸ ψήφισμα, καί μοι ἀνάγνωθι, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.2) in questions, to introduce an objection or express surprise, κ. τίς τόδ᾽ ἐξίκοιτ᾽ ἂν ἀγγέλων τάχο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; κ. πῶς; pray how? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. δὴ τί; but then what? [Refs]; κ. ποῖον; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. τίς εἶδε πώποτε βοῦς κριβανίτα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κἄπειτ᾽ ἔκανε; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. τίς πώποτε Χαριζόμενος ἑτέρῳ τοῦτο εἰργάσατ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.3) ={καίτοι}, and yet, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.4) at the beginning of a speech, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III) after words implying sameness or like ness, as, γνώμῃσι ἐχρέωντο ὁμοίῃσι κ. σύ they had the same opinion as you, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἴσον or ἴσα κ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ἴσῳ (i.e. ἐστὶ) κ. εἰ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) after words implying comparison or opposition, αἱ δαπάναι οὐχ ὁμοίως κ. πρίν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.3) to express simultaneity, ἦν ἦμαρ δεύτερον, κἀγὼ κατηγόμην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παρέρχονταί τε μέσαι νύκτες κ. ψύχεται [τὸ ὕδωρ] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [οἱ Λακεδαιμόνιοι] οὐκ ἔφθασαν τὴν ἀρχὴν κατασχόντες κ. Θηβαίοις εὐθὺς ἐπεβούλευσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV) joining an affirmative clause with a negative, ἀλλ᾽ ὥς τι δράσων εἷρπε κοὐ θανούμενος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.V) καί, καί. correlative, not only, but also. , κ. ἀεὶ κ. νῦν, κ. τότε κ. νῦν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) by anacoluthon, ὣς φαμένη κ. κερδοσύνῃ ἡγήσατ᾽ Ἀθήνη, for ὣς ἔφη κ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἔρχεται δὲ αὐτή τε. κ. τὸν υἱὸν ἔχουσα, for κ. ὁ υἱός, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) even, also, just, B.1) τάχα κεν κ. ἀναίτιον αἰτιόῳτο even the innocent, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; δόμεναι κ. μεῖζον ἄεθλον an even greater prize, [Refs]full five,[Refs 5th c.BC+] two or three, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) also, κ. ἐγώ I also, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κ. αὐτοί they also, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἀγίας καὶ Σωκράτης κ. τούτω ἀπεθανέτην likewise died, [Refs]; in adding surnames, etc, Ὦχος ὁ κ. Δαρειαῖος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; nominative ὁ κ. first in [Refs 1st c.BC+], frequently later, [Refs 2nd c.AD+], etc; Ἰούδας ὁ κ. Μακκαβαῖος [NT+8th c.BC+]; εἴπερ τι κ. ἄλλο, ὥς τις κ. ἄλλος, [Refs 5th c.BC+], not only, but also. , see at {μόνος}; οὐδὲν μᾶλλον. ἢ οὐ καὶ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2.b) frequently used both in the antecedent and relative clause, where we put also in the antecedent only, εἰ μὲν κ. σὺ εἶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων ὧνπερ κ. ἐγώ [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.3) frequently in apodosi, after temporal Conjs, ἀλλ᾽ ὅτε δή ῥα, κ. τότε δή. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also after εἰ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: as a Hebraism, κ. ἐγένετο. κ. [LXX+NT] B.4) with Advs, to give emphasis, κ. κάρτα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. λίην full surely, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κ. πάλαι, κ. πάνυ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. μάλα, κ. σφόδρα, in answers, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.5) with words expressing a minimum, even so much as, were it but, just, ἱέμενος κ. καπνὸν ἀποθρῴσκοντα νοῆσαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷς ἡδὺ κ. λέγειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίς δὲ κ. προσβλέψετα; who will so much as look at you? [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.6) just, τοῦτ᾽ αὐτὸ κ. νοσοῦμεν 'tis just that that ails me, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: frequently with a relative, τὸ κ. κλαίουσα τέτηκα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; and how long ago was the city sacked? [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ποῦ καί σφε θάπτε; where is he burying her? [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.7) even, just, implying assent, ἔπειτά με κ. λίποι αἰών thereafter let life e'en leave me, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.8) κ. εἰ even if, of a whole condition represented as an extreme case, opposed to εἰ κ. although, notwithstanding that, of a condition represented as immaterial even if fulfilled,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ κ. ἠπιστάμην if I had been able, [Refs 5th c.BC+] each exert their force separtely, as εἴ περ ἀδειής τ᾽ ἐστί, καὶ εἰ. and if. [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.9) before a Participle, to represent either καὶ εἰ, or εἰ καί, although, albeit, Ἕκτορα κ. μεμαῶτα μάχης σχήσεσθαι ὀΐω, for ἢν κ. μεμάῃ, how much soever he rage, although he rage, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C) Position: καί and, is by Poets sometimes put after another word, ἔγνωκα, τοῖσδε κοὐδὲν ἀντειπεῖν ἔχω, for καὶ τοῖσδε οὐδέν [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.2) καί also, sometimes goes between a preposition and its case, ἐν κ. θαλάσσᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.3) very seldom at the end of a verse, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D) crasis: with ᾰ, as κἄν, κἀγαθοί, etc; with ε, as κἀγώ, κἄπειτα, etc, Doric dialect κἠγώ, κἤπειτα, etc; with η, as Χἠ, Χἠμέρη, Χἠμεῖς, etc; with ῐ in Χἰκετεύετε, Χἰλαρ; with ο, as Χὠ, Χὤστις, etc; with υ in Χὐμεῖς, Χὐποχείριον, etc; with ω in the pronoun ᾧ, Χ; with αι, as κᾀσχρῶ; with αυ, as καὐτό; with ει, as κεἰ, κεἰς (but also κἀς), κᾆτ; with εὐ, as κεὐγένεια, κεὐσταλή; with οι in Χοἰ (Χᾠ [Refs]; with ου in Χοὖτος, κοὐ, κοὐδέ, and the like.
Strongs
Word:
καί
Transliteration:
kaí
Pronounciation:
kahee
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words; and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet; apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force

maybe
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ἄν
Greek:
ἂν
Transliteration:
an
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Particle or Disjunctive Particle
Grammar:
introducing an alternative
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, conditional particle, which cannot usually be separately translated in English, its force depending on the constructions which contain it (see further, LS, see word; WM, §xlii; M, Pr., 165 ff; MM, VGT, see word). 1) In apodosis, (i) with indic, imperfect or aor, expressing what would be or would have been if (εἰ with impf, aor. or plpf.) some condition were or had been fulfilled: Luk.7:39 17:6, Jhn.5:46, Gal.1:10, Mat.12:7 24:43, 1Co.2:8, Act.18:14, 1Jn.2:19, al. The protasis is sometimes understood (as also in cl.): Mat.25:27, Luk.19:23. In hypothetical sentences, expressing unreality, ἄν (as often in late writers, more rarely in cl.) is omitted: Jhn.8:39 15:24 19:11, Rom.7:7, Gal.4:15; (ii) with opt, inf, ptcp. (cl; see LS, see word; M, Int., §275; M, Pr., 167:4). 2) In combination with conditional, relative, temporal, and final words; (i) as in cl, with subj, (a) in protasis with εἰ, in Attic contr. ἐάν, which see; (b) in conditional, relative, and temporal clauses (coalescing with ὅτε, ἐπεί, etc; see: ὅταν, ἐπάν, etc.), ever, soever; (α) with pres, ἡνίκα, 2Co.3:15; ὃς ἄν, Rom.9:15 (LXX) 16:2, al; ὅσοι ἄν, Luk.9:5; ὡς ἄν, Rom.15:24 (M, Pr., 167); (β) with aor, ὃς ἄν, Mat.5:21, 22, 31; ἕως ἄν, until, Mat.2:13, Mrk.6:10, al; ὡς ἄν, as soon as (M, Pr., 167), 1Co.11:34, Php.2:23. On the frequently use of ἐάν for ἄν with the foregoing words, see: ἐάν; (ii) in late Gk, when some actual fact is spoken of, with indic: ὅταν (which see); ὅπου ἄν, Mrk.6:56 (M, Pr., 168); καθότι ἄν, Act.2:45 4:35; ὡς ἄν, 1Co.12:2. 3) in iterative construction, with imperfect and aor. indic. (M, Pr., 167): Act.2:45 4:35, 1Co.12:2. 4) with optative, giving a potential sense to a question or wish: Act.8:31 26:29. 5) Elliptical constructions: εἰ μή τι ἄν (M, Pr., 169), 1Co.7:5; ὡς ἄν, with inf, as it were (op. cit. 167), 2Co.10:9. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, [ᾰ], Epic dialect, Lyric poetry, Ionic dialect, [Refs 4th c.AD+], Attic dialect; also κεν) Epic dialect, Aeolic dialect, Thess, κᾱ Doric dialect, Boeotian dialect, El; the two combined in Epic dialect (below [Refs 4th c.BC+], εἰκ ἄν[Refs 4th c.BC+]:—modal Particle used with Verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] κε is four times as common as ἄν, in Lyric poetry about equally common. No clear distinction can be traced, but κε as an enclitic is somewhat less emphatic; ἄν is preferred by [Refs 8th c.BC+] in negative clauses, κε (ν) with the relative. A) In Simple Sentences, and in the Apodosis of Compound Sentences; here ἄν belongs to the Verb, and denotes that the assertion made by the Verb is dependent on a condition, expressed or implied: thus ἦλθεν he came, ἦλθεν ἄν he would have come (under conditions, which may or may not be defined), and so he might have come; ἔλθοι may he come, ἔλθοι ἄν he would come (under certain conditions), and so he might come. A.I) WITH INDICATIVE: A.I.1) with historical tenses, generally imperfect and aorist, less frequently pluperfect, never perfect, see below, A.I.1.a) most frequently in apodosis of conditional sentences, with protasis implying nonfulfilment of a past or present condition, and apodosis expressing what would be or would have been the case if the condition were or had been fulfilled. The imperfect with ἄν refers to continued action, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in past time, except perhaps καί κε θάμ᾽ ἐνθάδ᾽ ἐόντες ἐμισγόμεθ᾽[Refs 8th c.BC+]; later also in present time, first in [Refs 6th c.BC+]; πολὺ ἂν θαυμαστότερον ἦν, εἰ ἐτιμῶντο it would be far more strange if they were honoured, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν νήσων ἐκράτει, εἰ μή τι καὶ ναυτικὸν εἶχεν he would not have been master of islands if he had not had also some naval power, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. The aorist strictly refers only to past time, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ τότε ταύτην ἔσχε τὴν γνώμην, οὐδὲν ἂν ὧν νυνὶ πεποίηκεν ἔπραξεν if he had then come to this opinion, he would have accomplished nothing of what he has now done, [Refs 4th c.BC+], but is used idiomatically with Verbs of saying, answering, etc, as we say I should have said, εἰ μὴ πατὴρ ἦσθ᾽, εἶπον ἄν σ᾽ οὐκ εὖ φρονεῖν[Refs 5th c.BC+]pluperfect refers to completed actions, as ὃ εἰ ἀπεκρίνω, ἱκανῶς ἂν ἤδη παρὰ σοῦ τὴν ὁσιότητα ἐμεμαθήκη I should have already learnt,[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.b) the protasis is frequently understood: ὑπό κεν ταλασίφρονά περ δέος εἷλεν fear would have seized even the stout-hearted (had he heard the sound), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸ γὰρ ἔρυμα τῷ στρατοπέδῳ οὐκ ἂν ἐτειχίσαντο they would not have built the wall (if they had not won a battle), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πολλοῦ γὰρ ἂν ἦν ἄξια for (if that were so) they would be worth much, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν ὅ τι ἂν ἐποιεῖτε for there was nothing which you could have done, i. e. would have done (if you had tried), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.I.1.c) with no definite protasis understood, to express what would have been likely to happen, or might have happened in past time: ἢ γάρ μιν ζωόν γε κιχήσεαι, ἤ κεν Ὀρέστης κτεῖνεν ὑποφθάμενος for either you will find him alive, or else Orestes may already have killed him before you, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ θεασάμενος πᾶς ἄν τις ἀνὴρ ἠράσθη δάϊος εἶναι every man who saw this (the 'Seven against Thebes') would have longed to be a warrior, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially with τάχα, which see, ἀλλ᾽ ἦλθε μὲν δὴ τοῦτο τοὔνειδος τάχ᾽ ἂν ὀργῇ βιασθὲν μᾶλλον ἢ γνώμῃ φρενῶν, i. e. it might perhaps have come, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τάχα ἂν δὲ καὶ ἄλλως πως ἐσπλεύσαντες (i.e. διέβησαν) and they might also perhaps have crossed by sea (to Sicily) in some other way, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.d) ἄν is frequently omitted in apodosi with Verbs expressing obligation, propriety, or possibility, as ἔδει, ἐχρῆν, εἰκὸς ἦν, etc, and sometimes for rhetorical effect, εἰ μὴ. ᾖσμεν, φόβον παρέσχεν it had caused (for it would have caused) fear, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2) with future indicative: A.I.2.a) frequently in Epic dialect, usually with κεν, rarely ἄν, [Refs 8th c.BC+] and he will likely be angry to whom-soever I shall come, [Refs]; καί κέ τις ὧδ᾽ ἐρέει and in that case men will say,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Lyric poetry, μαθὼν δέ τις ἂν ἐρεῖ[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2.b) rarely in codices of Attic dialect Prose writers, σαφὲς ἂν καταστήσετε[Refs 5th c.BC+]future infinitive and participle see below A.II) WITH SUBJUNCTIVE, only in Epic dialect, the meaning being the same as with the future indicative [Refs]I will take her myself, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πείθευ, ἐγὼ δέ κέ τοι εἰδέω χάριν obey and if so I will be grateful, [Refs]; also with other persons, giving emphasis to the future, οὐκ ἄν τοι χραίσμῃ κίθαρις[Refs] A.III) WITH OPTATIVE (never future, rarely perfect πῶς ἂν λελήθοι [με]; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.a) in apodosis of conditional sentences, after protasis in optative with εἰ or some other conditional or relative word, expressing a future condition: ἀλλ᾽ εἴ μοί τι πίθοιο, τό κεν πολὺ κέρδιον εἴη[Refs 8th c.BC+] present and aorist optative with κε or ἄν are sometimes used like imperfect and aorist indicative with ἄν in Attic, with either regular indicative or another optative in the protasis: καί νύ κεν ἔνθ᾽ ἀπόλοιτο. εἰ μὴ. νόησε κτλ, i. e. he would have perished, had she not perceived, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ νῦν ἐπὶ ἄλλῳ ἀεθλεύοιμεν, ἦ τ᾽ ἂν ἐγὼ. κλισίηνδε φεροίμην if we were now contending in another's honour, I should now carry, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.b) with protasis in present or future, the optative with ἄν in apodosi takes a simply future sense: φρούριον δ᾽ εἰ ποιήσονται, τῆς μὲν γῆς βλάπτοιεν ἄν τι μέρος they might perhaps damage, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.c) with protasis understood: φεύγωμεν· ἔτι γάρ κεν ἀλύξαιμεν κακὸν ἦμαρ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὔτε ἐσθίουσι πλείω ἢ δύνανται φέρειν· διαρραγεῖεν γὰρ ἄν for (if they should do so) they would burst, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν δ᾽ οὔ κε δύ᾽ ἀνέρε. ἀπ᾽ οὔδεος ὀχλίσσειαν two men could not heave the stone from the ground, i. e. would not, if they should try, [Refs 8th c.BC+] sometimes with reference to past time, Τυδεΐδην οὐκ ἂν γνοίης ποτέροισι μετείη[Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III.d) with no definite protasis implied, in potential sense: ἡδέως δ᾽ ἂν ἐροίμην Λεπτίνην but I would gladly ask Leptines, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; βουλοίμην ἄν I should like, Latin velim (but ἐβουλόμην ἄν I should wish, if it were of any avail, vellem); ποῖ οὖν τραποίμεθ᾽ ἄ; which way then can we turn? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν μεθείμην τοῦ θρόνου I will not give up the throne, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; idiomatically, referring to the past, αὗται δὲ οὐκ ἂν πολλαὶ εἶεν but these would not (on investigation) prove to be many, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴησαν δ᾽ ἂν οὗτοι Κρῆτες these would be (i. e. would have been) Cretans, [Refs 5th c.BC+] i.e. it would not prove to be, etc. (for, it is not, etc.), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.e) in questions, expressing a wish: τίς ἂν θεῶν. δοί;[Refs 5th c.BC+] as a mild command, exhortation, or entreaty, τλαίης κεν Μενελάῳ ἐπιπροέμεν ταχὺν ἰόν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὺ μὲν κομίζοις ἂν σεαυτὸν ᾗ θέλεις you may take yourself off (milder than κόμιζε σεαυτόν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χωροῖς ἂν εἴσω you may go in, [Refs]; φράζοις ἄν, λέγοις ἄν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.f) in a protasis which is also an apodosis: εἴπερ ἄλλῳ τῳ ἀνθρώπων πειθοίμην ἄν, καὶ σοὶ πείθομαι if I would trust any (other) man (if he gave me his word), I trust you, [Refs]; εἰ μὴ ποιήσαιτ᾽ ἂν τοῦτο if you would not do this (if you could), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.g) rarely omitted with optative in apodosis: ῥεῖα θεός γ᾽ ἐθέλων καὶ τηλόθεν ἄνδρα σαώσαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in Trag, θᾶσσον ἢ λέγοι τις[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.h) ἄν with future optative is probably always corrupt (compare [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰδὼς ὅτι οὐδέν᾽ ἂν καταλήψοιτο (οὐδένα Bekk.) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV) WITH infinitive and participle (sometimes adjective equivalent to participle, τῶν δυνατῶν ἂν κρῖναι[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1) present infinitive or participle: A.IV.1.a) representing imperfect indicative, οἴεσθε τὸν πατέρα. οὐκ ἂν φυλάττει; do you think he would not have kept them safe? (οὐκ ἂν ἐφύλαττεν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδυνάτων ἂν ὄντων [ὑμῶν] ἐπιβοηθεῖν when you would have been unable, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1.b) representing present optative, πόλλ᾽ ἂν ἔχων (representing ἔχοιμ᾽ ἄν) ἕτερ᾽ εἰπεῖν παραλείπω[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2) aorist infinitive or participle: A.IV.2.a) representing aorist indicative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγεῖσθ᾽ αὐτὸν κἂν ἐπιδραμεῖ; do you not think he would even have run thither? (καὶ ἐπέδραμεν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἴσμεν ὑμᾶς ἀναγκασθέντας ἄν we know you would have been compelled, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ῥᾳδίως ἂν ἀφεθείς when he might easily have been acquitted, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2.b) representing aorist optative, οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατῆσαι αὐτοὺς τῆς γῆς ἡγοῦμαι I think they would not even be masters of the land (οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατήσειαν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁρῶν ῥᾳδίως ἂν αὐτὸ ληφθέν (ληφθείη ἄν) [Refs]; οὔτε ὄντα οὔτε ἂν γενόμενα, i.e. things which are not and never could happen (ἃ οὔτε ἂν γένοιτο), [Refs] A.IV.3) perfect infinitive or participle representing: A.IV.3.a) pluperfect indicative, πάντα ταῦθ᾽ ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων ἂν ἑαλωκέναι (φήσειεν ἄν) he would say that all these would have been destroyed by the barbarians (ἑαλώκη ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.IV.3.b) perfect optative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγοῦμαι αὐτοὺς δίκην ἀξίαν δεδωκέναι, εἰ. καταψηφίσαισθε I do not believe they would (then) have suffered (δεδωκότες ἂν εἶεν) punishment enough, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.4) future infinitive or participle, never in Epic dialect, and probably always corrupt in Attic dialect, νομίζων μέγιστον ἂν σφᾶς ὠφελήσειν (to be read -ῆσαι) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle is still more exceptional, ὡς ἐμοῦ οὐκ ἂν ποιήσοντος ἄλλα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; both are found in later Gk, νομίσαντες ἂν οἰκήσειν οὕτως ἄριστα[Refs 2nd c.BC+]; with participle, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B) IN DEPENDENT CLAUSE[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I) In the protasis of conditional sentences with εἰ, regularly with the subjunctive. In Attic εἰ ἄν is contracted into ἐάν, ἤν, or ἄν (ᾱ) (which see): [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἢν ἐγγὺς ἔλθῃ θάνατος, οὐδεὶς βούλεται θνῄσκειν if death (ever) come near, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in relative or temporal clauses with a conditional force; here ἄν coalesces with ὅτε, ὁπότε, ἐπεί, ἐπειδή, compare ὅταν, ὁπόταν, ἐπήν or ἐπάν (Ionic dialect ἐπεάν), ἐπειδάν: [Refs 8th c.BC+], ἐπήν, εὖτ᾽ ἄ; see also εἰσόκε (εἰς ὅ κε):—τάων ἥν κ᾽ ἐθέλωμι φίλην ποιήσομ᾽ ἄκοιτιν whomsoever of these I may wish, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὅταν δὴ μὴ σθένω, πεπαύσομαι when I shall have no strength, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐχθρὸς γάρ μοι κεῖνος. ὅς χ᾽ ἕτερον μὲν κεύθῃ ἐνὶ φρεσίν, ἄλλο δὲ εἴπῃ whoever conceals one thing in his mind and speaks another, [Refs 8th c.BC+]subjunctive in both the above constructions [Refs] without ἄ; also Trag. and Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μέχρι and πρίν occasionally take subjunctive without ἄν in prose, e.g. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μέχρι οὗ), [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) in final clauses introduced by relative adverbs, as ὡς, ὅπως (of Manner), ἵνα (of Place), ὄφρα, ἕως, etc. (of Time), frequently in Epic dialect, σαώτερος ὥς κε νέηαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also after ὡς in [Refs 5th c.BC+] indicative is regular in _Attic dialect_); ἵνα final does not take ἄν or κε except ἵνα εἰδότες ἤ κε θάνωμεν ἤ κεν. φύγοιμεν[Refs 8th c.BC+] = where in [Refs 5th c.BC+] = lest, takes ἄν only with optative in apodosis, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) in Epic dialect sometimes with OPTATIVE as with subjunctive (always κε (ν), except εἴ περ ἂν αὐταὶ Μοῦσαι ἀείδοιεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥς κε. δοίη ᾧ κ᾽ ἐθέλοι that he might give her to whomsoever he might please,[Refs 8th c.BC+] belongs to Verb in apodosis, as in ὡς δ᾽ ἂν ἥδιστα ταῦτα φαίνοιτο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) rarely in oratio obliqua, where a relative or temporary word retains an ἄν which it would have with subjunctive in direct form, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—similarly after a preceding optative, οὐκ ἀποκρίναιο ἕως ἂν. σκέψαιο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) rarely with εἰ and INDICATIVE in protasis, only in Epic dialect: B.III.1) with future indicative as with subjunctive: αἴ κεν Ἰλίου πεφιδήσεται[Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.2) with εἰ and a past tense of indicative, once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so Ζεὺς γάρ κ᾽ ἔθηκε νῆσον εἴ κ᾽ ἐβούλετο Oracle texts cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) in later Greek, ἄν with relative words is used with INDICATIVE in all tenses, as ὅπου ἂν εἰσεπορεύετο[NT+4th c.AD+]; ἔνθ᾽ ἂν πέφυκεν ἡ ὁλότης εἶναι[Refs 6th c.AD+]; compare ἐάν, ὅταν. C) with imperfect and more rarely aorist indicative in ITERATIVE construction, to express elliptically a condilion fulfilled whenever an opportumty offered; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] she would (i. e. used to) weep and lament, 3.119; εἶτα πῦρ ἂν οὐ παρῆν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴ τινες ἴδοιεν, ἀνεθάρσησαν ἄν whenever they saw it, on each occasion, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive representing imperfect of this construction, ἀκούω Λακεδαιμονίους τότε ἐμβαλόντας ἂν. ἀναχωρεῖν, i. e. I hear they used to retire (ἀνεχώρουν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D) GENERAL REMARKS: D.I) POSITION OF ἄν. D.I.1) in A, when ἄν does not coalesce with the relative word (as in ἐάν, ὅταν), it follows directly or is separated only by other particles, as μέν, δέ, τε, γάρ, καί, νυ, περ, etc; as εἰ μέν κεν. εἰ δέ κε[Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely by τις, as ὅποι τις ἄν, οἶμαι, προσθῇ[Refs 8th c.BC+] two such Particles may precede κε, as εἴ περ γάρ κεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ γάρ τίς κε, ὃς μὲν γάρ κε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely in Prose, ὅποι μὲν γὰρ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.2) in apodosis, ἄν may stand either next to its Verb (before or after it), or after some other emphatic word, especially an interrogative, a negative (e. g. οὐδ᾽ ἂν εἷς, οὐκ ἂν ἔτι, etc.), or an important Adjective or Adverb; also after a participle which represents the protasis, λέγοντος ἄν τινος πιστεῦσαι οἴεσθ; do you think they would have believed it if any one had told them? (εἴ τις ἔλεγεν, ἐπίστευσαν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D.I.3) ἄν is frequently separated from its infinitive by such Verbs as οἴομαι, δοκέω, φημί, οἶδα, etc, οὐκ ἂν οἴει; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ νῦν ἡδέως ἄν μοι δοκῶ κοινωνῆσαι I think that I should, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μήτε προῄδει μηδεὶς μήτ᾽ ἂν ᾠήθη τήμερον ῥηθῆναι (where ἄν belongs to ῥηθῆναι) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.4) ἄν never begins a sentence, or even a clause after a comma, but may stand first after a parenthetic clause, ἀλλ᾽, ὦ μέλ᾽, ἄν μοι σιτίων διπλῶν ἔδει[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II) REPETITION OF ἄν:—in apodosis ἄν may be used twice or even three times with the same Verb, either to make the condition felt throughout a long sentence, or to emphasize certain words, ὥστ᾽ ἄν, εἰ σθένος λάβοιμι, δηλώσαιμ᾽ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; attached to a parenthetical phrase, ἔδρασ᾽ ἄν, εὖ τοῦτ᾽ ἴσθ᾽ ἄν, εἰ. [Refs] D.II.2) ἄν is coupled with κε (ν) a few times in [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.III) ELLIPSIS OF VERB:—sometimes the Verb to which ἄν belongs must be supplied, in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὐκ ἂν πρὸ τοῦ (i.e. ἔρρεγκον) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἂν δοκεῖ σοι Πρίαμος (i.e. πρᾶξαι), εἰ τάδ᾽ ἤνυσε;[Refs 4th c.BC+] —so in phrases like{πῶς γὰρ ἄν}; and πῶς οὐκ ἄν (i.e. εἴη); also in ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ (or ὡσπερανεί), as φοβούμενος ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ παῖς (i. e. ὥσπερ ἂν ἐφοβήθη εἰ παῖς ἦν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so τοσοῦτον ἐφρόνησαν, ὅσον περ ἂν (i.e. ἐφρόνησαν) εἰ.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare κἄν:—so the Verb of a protasis containing ἄν may be understood, ὅποι τις ἂν προσθῇ, κἂν μικρὰν δύναμιν (i. e. καὶ ἐὰν προσθῇ) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐμοῦ οὖν ἰόντος ὅπῃ ἂν καὶ ὑμεῖς (i.e. ἴητε) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.IV) ELLIPSIS OF ἄν:—when an apodosis consists of several co-ordinate clauses, ἄν is generally used only in the first and understood in the others: πείθοι᾽ ἂν εἰ πείθοι᾽· ἀπειθοίης δ᾽ ἴσως[Refs 4th c.BC+]: even when the construction is continued in a new sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is repeated for the sake of clearness or emphasis,[Refs 5th c.BC+] B) ἄν, [ᾱ], Attic dialect, ={ἐάν},{ἤν}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ[Refs 4th c.BC+]: not common in earlier Attic dialect Inscrr, [NT+4th c.BC+] C) ἄν or ἀν, Epic form of ἀνά, (which see) D) ἄν, shortened from ἄνα, see entry ἀνά G.
Strongs
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
án
Pronounciation:
an
Language:
Greek
Definition:
(what-, where-, wither-, who-)soever; a primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty

he have allowed
Strongs:
Strongs extended:
Lexicon:
ἀφίημι
Greek:
ἀφῆκεν
Transliteration:
aphēken
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to release
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
leave, to release, leave/abandon
Tyndale
Word:
ἀφίημι
Transliteration:
aphiēmi
Gloss:
to release: leave
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἀφ-ίημι, [in LXX for נשׂא, נוח hi, נתן, סלח ni, עזב, etc;] 1) to send forth, send away, let go: of divorce (DB, iii, 274a), τ. γυναῖκα (Hdt.), 1Co.7:11-13; of death, τ. πνεῦμα (Gen.35:18, Hdt, al.), Mat.27:50; (φωνήν, to utter a cry, Mrk.15:37; of debts, to remit, forgive (cl.), τ. δανεῖον, Mat.18:27; τ. ὀφειλήν, Mat.18:32; esp. of sins (Cremer 296f.), τ. ἁμαρτίας, ἁμαρτήματα, ἀνομίας, Mat.9:2, Rom.4:7 " (LXX), 1Jn.1:9, al; punctiliar and iterative present (M, Pr., 119), Mrk.2:5, Luk.11:4; Ion. pf, ἀφέωνται (M, Pr., 38), Luk.5:23. 2) to leave alone, leave, neglect: Mat.4:11 5:24 15:14, Mrk.1:20, 31 Jhn.4:3, 28 al; τ. ἐντολὴν τ. θεοῦ, Mrk.7:8; τον̀ τ. ἀρχῆς τ. Χριστοῦ λόγον, Heb.6:1; τ. ἀγάπην τ. πρώτην, Rev.2:4; ptcp, ἀφείς, pleonastic (as in Aram; M, Pr., 14; Dalman, Words, 21f.), Mat.13:36 22:22, Mrk.8:13, al. 3) to let, suffer, permit: Mat.3:15; with accusative, Mat.3:15, 19:14, al; with accusative of thing(s) and dative of person(s), Mat.5:40; with inf. pres, Mat.23:14, al; aor, Mrk.5:37, al; in late Gk. (M, Pr., 175f.), before ἵνα, Mrk.11:16, Jhn.12:7; with subjunct. (M, Pr., l.with; Bl, §64, 2), Mat.7:4 27:49, Mrk.15:36, Luk.6:42 (see further MM, see word). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἀφίημι
Transliteration:
aphiēmi
Gloss:
to release: leave
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἀφίημι, 2nd pers.singular ἀφίης[Refs 5th c.BC+] Ionic dialect ἀπίει[Refs 5th c.BC+], 1st pers.plural ἀφίεμεν[Refs 5th c.BC+]imperfect ἀφίειν, with double augment ἠφίειν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers.singular ἀφίει[Refs 8th c.BC+], Ionic dialect ἀπίει[NT+5th c.BC+]; 2nd pers.plural ἀφίετε[Refs 4th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers.plural ἀφίεσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: future ἀφήσω[Refs 8th c.BC+], Ionic dialect ἀπ-[Refs 5th c.BC+]: perfect ἀφεῖκα[Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist I ἀφῆκα, Ionic dialectἀπ, Epic dialect ἀφέηκα, used in indicative only, [Refs 8th c.BC+]aorist 2 indicative only in dual and plural, ἀφέτην, ἀφεῖμεν, ἀφεῖτε or ἄφετε, ἀφεῖσαν or ἄφεσα; imperative ἄφες, subjunctive ἀφῶ, optative αφείην (2nd pers.plural ἀφεῖτε[Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive ἀφεῖναι, participle ἀφείς:—middle, ἀφίεμαι, Ionic dialect ἀπίεμαι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: imperfect 3rd.pers.singular ἀφίετο[Refs 8th c.BC+]: future ἀφήσομαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist 2 ἀφείμην[Refs 5th c.BC+]; imperative ἀφοῦ, ἄφεσθε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; infinitive -έσθαι[Refs 5th c.BC+], participle -έμενος[Refs 5th c.BC+]; Arc.infinitive ἀφεῶσθαι[Refs 4th c.BC+]:—passive, perfect ἀφεῖμαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; infinitive ἀφεῖσθαι[Refs 3rd c.BC+]: pluperfect 2nd pers.singular ἀφεῖσο[Refs 4th c.BC+]: rarer perfect 3rd.pers.plural ἀφέωνται[NT]: aorist ἀφείθην[Refs 5th c.BC+], Ionic dialect ἀπείθην[Refs 5th c.BC+]; later Aeolic dialect infinitive ἀφέθην[Refs 2nd c.BC+]: future ἀφεθήσομαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]: ῑ always in Attic dialect [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—send forth, discharge, of missiles, ἔγχος, δίσκον ἀφῆκεν, [Refs 8th c.BC+] throw oneself upon, give oneself up to it, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. γλῶσσαν let loose one's tongue, make utterance, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. φθογγήν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. θυμὸν ἔς τινας give vent to. (see.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὀργὴν εἴς τινα vent upon, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀ. δάκρυα shed tears, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀ. παντοδαπὰ χρώματα change colour in all ways, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently of liquids, etc, emit, ἀ. τὸ ὑγρόν, τὸν θολόν, τὸ σπέρμα, etc, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; of plants, ἄνθος ἀφιεῖσαι putting forth, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of a spider, ἀ. ἀράχνιον[Refs 4th c.BC+]; put forth, produce, καρπόν[Refs 4th c.BC+] leave issue, [NT]:—passive, to be emitted, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of troops, to be let go, launched against the enemy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) let fall from one's grasp, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; opposed to κατέχω, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) give up or hand over to, τὴν Ἰωνίην τοῖσι βαρβάροισι[Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, ἡ Ἀττικὴ ἀπεῖτο ἤδη[Refs 5th c.BC+] II) send away, II.1) of persons, κακῶς ἀφίει[Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) let go, loose, set free, ζωόν τινα ἀ.[Refs]; let loose, βοῦς[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. ἐλεύθερον, ἀζήμιον, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐς οἴκους, ἐκ γῆς, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with accusative person et genitive of things, release from a thing, ἀποικίης[Refs 5th c.BC+]: in legal sense, acquit of a charge or engagement, φόνου τινα[Refs 4th c.BC+]; συναλλαγμάτων[Refs]: with accusative only, acquit, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, κινδύνου ἀφιέμενοι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς γέροντας τοὺς ἀφειμένους released from duty, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.1.c) let go, dissolve, disband, of an army or fleet, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; dismiss, δικαστήρια (opposed to λύειν ἐκκλησίαν) [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.1.d) put away, divorce, γυναῖκα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. γάμους break off a marriage, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. τὸν υἱόν disown him, [Refs 4th c.BC+] (but with metaphorically from releasing a debtor). II.1.e) dedicate, τὰ νεογνὰ τῷ θεῷ[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) of things, get rid of, ἀφέτην πολυκαγκέα δίψαν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀφίει μένος [ἔγχεος] slackened its force, [Refs]; ἀ. ὀργήν put away wrath (see.[Refs 4th c.BC+]; γόους[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. πνεῦμα, ψυχήν, give up the ghost, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in Prose, give up, leave off, μόχθον[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ξυμμαχίαν, σπονδάς, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle, ἀ. τὸ προλέγειν[Refs 1st c.BC+] II.2.b) ἀ. πλοῖον ἐς. loose ship for a place, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2.c) in legal sense (see. supr. Ib), with dative person et accusative of things, ἀ. τινὶ αἰτίην remit him a charge, [NT+4th c.BC+]; ἀ. πληγάς τινι excuse him a flogging, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. ὅρκον Jusj. in Legal cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δάνειόν τινι[NT] III) leave alone, pass by, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; neglect, τὰ θεῖα [Refs 5th c.BC+] leave unguarded, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄτιμον, ἔρημον ἀ. τινά, [NT+5th c.BC+]; leave, περὶ κινήσεως, ὅθεν ὑπάρχει, τοῖς ἄλλοις ἀφεῖσαν[Refs]:—passive, especially in perfect imperative, ἀφείσθω ἐπὶ τοῦ παρόντος missum fiat, [Refs] III.2) with accusative et infinitive, ἀ. τὸ πλοῖον φέρεσθαι let the boat be carried away, [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) with accusative person et infinitive, suffer, permit one to do a thing, ἀ. τινὰ ἀποπλέειν[Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive understood, ἡνίκα προῖκ᾽ ἀφιᾶσιν (i.e. θεᾶσθαι) οἱ θεατρῶναι[Refs 4th c.BC+]: with subjunctive, ἄφες ἐκβάλω[NT+1st c.AD+]; ἄφες ἵνα. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; οὐκ ἤφιεν ἵνα. [NT]:—passive, ἀφείθη σχολάζειν[Refs 4th c.BC+] V) seemingly intransitive (i.e. στρατόν, ναῦς, etc.), break up, march, sail, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+] V.2) with infinitive, give up doing, ἀφεὶς σκοπεῖν τὰ δίκαια[Refs 4th c.BC+] B) middle, send forth from oneself, much like active; θορήν[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) loose something of one's own from, δειρῆς δ᾽ οὔ πω. ἀφίετο πήχεε λευκώ she loosed not her arms from off my neck, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.3) frequently in Attic dialect with genitive only, τέκνων ἀφοῦ let go of the children! [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs > g863
Word:
ἀφίημι
Transliteration:
aphíēmi
Pronounciation:
af-ee'-ay-mee
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
an intensive form of , to go); to send forth, in various applications (as follow); cry, forgive, forsake, lay aside, leave, let (alone, be, go, have), omit, put (send) away, remit, suffer, yield up; from g575 (ἀπό) and (to send

to be broken into
Strongs:
Lexicon:
διορύσσω
Greek:
διορυχθῆναι
Transliteration:
dioruchthēnai
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to break in
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Passive Infinitive
Grammar:
an ACTION that was to be done
Source:
Identical in Nestle/Aland and other source, minor difference in King James sources
Editions:
Variations:
διορυγῆναι (t=diorugēnai) to be broken into - g1358=V-2APN in: Tyn, Treg, TR, Byz
Tyndale
Word:
διορύσσω
Transliteration:
diorussō
Gloss:
to break in
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
δι-ορύσσω [in LXX: Job.24:16, Exo.12:5, 7 12:12, (חָתַר) *;] to dig through: with accusative, of house-breaking (as in π; MM, Exp., xi), Mat.24:43, Luk.12:39; absol, Mat.6:19-20. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
διορύσσω
Transliteration:
diorussō
Gloss:
to break in
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
διορ-ύσσω, Attic dialect διορύττω, dig through, διὰ τάφρον ὀρύξας having dug a trench across or along, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοῖχον δ, ={τοιχωρυχέω}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: —passive, [NT] 2) metaphorically, undermine, ruin, [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—passive, διορωρυγμένα δωροδοκίαις [Refs 1st c.AD+] (but to be entrenched in our several cities, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) worm out, ἀπόρρητα [Refs 3rd c.BC+] III) passive, to be shut up in a funeral vault, [Refs 1st c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
διορύσσω
Transliteration:
diorýssō
Pronounciation:
dee-or-oos'-so
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to penetrate burglariously; break through (up); from g1223 (διά) and g3736 (ὀρύσσω)

the
Strongs:
Lexicon:
Greek:
τὸν
Transliteration:
ton
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

house
Strongs:
Strongs extended:
Lexicon:
οἶκος
Greek:
οἶκον
Transliteration:
oikon
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
home, home/temple/building
Tyndale
Word:
οἶκος
Transliteration:
oikos
Gloss:
house: home
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male
Definition:
οἶκος, -οῦ, ὁ, [in LXX chiefly for בַּיִת, also for אֹהֶל,הֵכָל, etc;] 1) prop, a house, dwelling: Act.2:2 19:16; with genitive poss, Mat.9:6, 7 Mrk.2:11, Luk.1:23, al; with genitive attrib, ἐμπορίου, Jhn.2:16; προσευχῆς, Mat.21:13, al; of a sanctuary (Hdt, Eur.): οἶ. τ. θεοῦ, of the tabernacle, Mat.12:4, al; the temple, Mat.21:13, al; metaphorically of a city: Mat.23:38, Luk.13:35; of the body, Mat.12:44, Luk.11:24; of Christians, 1Pe.2:5; ἐν οἴ (M, Pr., 81f.), at home, Mrk.2:1, 1Co.11:34 14:35; so κατ ̓ οἶκον, Act.2:46 5:42; οἱ εἰς (= οἱ ἐν; see: εἰς) τ. οἶ, Luk.7:10 15:6; κατ ̓οἴκους, from house to house, Act.8:3 20:20; εἰς (κατ ̓) οἶκον, with genitive (Bl, §46, 9), Mrk.8:3, Luk.14:1, Rom.16:5, al. 2) By meton, a house, household, family: Luk.10:5, Act.7:10, 1Co.1:16, 1Ti.3:4, 5 al; of the Church, ὁ οἶ. τ. θεοῦ, 1Ti.3:15, Heb.3:2, 1Pe.4:17; of descendants, οἶ Ἰσραήλ (Δαυείδ, Ἰακώβ; Bl, §47, 9), Mat.10:6, Luk.1:27, 33 al. (cf. Exo.6:14, 1Ki.2:30, al.). SYN.: see: οἰκία. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οἶκος
Transliteration:
oikos
Gloss:
house: home
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male
Definition:
οἶκος, ὁ, house, not only of built houses, but of any dwelling-place, as that of Achilles at Troy (see. κλισία), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of the Cyclops' cave, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of a tent, [LXX]; οἶκον ἱκάνεται is coming home, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰς or ἐς οἶκον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ κατ᾽ οἶκον[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπ᾽ οἴκου ἀποχωρῆσαι go home wards, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀπ᾽ οἴκου from home, [Refs]; compare οἰκία. b) frequently omitted after εἰς or ἐν, see at {εἰς} [Refs 4th c.BC+] 2) room, chamber, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; dining-hall, ἑπτάκλινος οἶ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; room in a temple, [Refs] frequently, = a single house, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κλαυθμῶν τῶν ἐξ οἴκων domestic griefs, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐς or πρὸς οἴκους, [Refs]; κατ᾽ οἴκους at home, within, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) of public buildings, meeting-house, hall, οἶ. Κηρύκων [Refs] of treasuries at Delos, [Refs 5th c.AD+], see at {ἐγκριτήριος}; temple, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τῷ οἴ. τοῦ Ἄμμωνος [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ὁ οἶ. [τοῦ θεοῦ] [NT]; of a funerary monument, [Refs]; ἀΐδιοι οἶ, i.e. tombs, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 4) cage for birds, [Refs] (assuming variant, οἰκ[ίσκ]ῳ Valck.); beehive, [Refs] 5) Astrology texts, domicile of a planet, [Refs 1st c.AD+] II) one's household goods, substance [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in Attic dialect law, estate, inheritance, οἶκον κατασχεῖν τινος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare οἰκία. III) a reigning house, οἶ. ὁ βασιλέος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also of any family, [LXX+4th c.BC+]; οἶ. Σεβαστός, = domus Augusta, [Refs 1st c.AD+]: cf. Sanskrit veśás, viś- 'house', Latin vicus, vicinus, etc.)
Strongs > g3624
Word:
οἶκος
Transliteration:
oîkos
Pronounciation:
oy'-kos
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a dwelling (more or less extensive, literal or figurative); by implication, a family (more or less related, literally or figuratively); home, house(-hold), temple; of uncertain affinity

of him.
Strongs:
Lexicon:
αὐτός
Greek:
αὐτοῦ.
Transliteration:
autou
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
he/she/it/self
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun Genitive Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned male person or thing that something belongs to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
his
Alternates:
Tyndale
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek Personal Pronoun (3rd person)
Definition:
αὐτός, -ή, -ό, determinative pron., in late Gk. much more frequently than in cl. (WM, 178f; Jannaris, HGG, §1399). 1) Emphatic (so always in nom. exc. when preceded by the art, see infr, iii); (1) self (ipse), expressing opposition, distinction, exclusion, etc, αὐ. ἐκχυθήσεται, Luk.5:37; αὐ. ἐγινώσκεν, Jhn.2:25; αὐ.ὑμεῖς, Jhn.3:28; καὶ αὐ. ἐγώ, Rom.15:14; αὐ. Ἰησοῦς, Jhn.2:24; αὐ. καὶ οἱ μετ᾽ αὐτοῦ, Mrk.2:25; ὑμεῖς αὐ, Mrk.6:31; esp. (as freq in cl.) αὐ. ὁ, Mat.3:4, Mrk.6:17, Jhn.16:27, 1Th.3:11, al; in late Gk, sometimes weakened, ἐν αὐτῇ τ. ὥρᾳ, in that hour, Luk.10:21 (M, Pr., 91; MM, see word); (2) emphatic, he, she, it (M, Pr., 86; Bl, §48, 1, 2, 7), Mat.1:21, 12:50, Luk.6:35, al; pointing to some one as master (cl.), Mat.8:24, Mrk.4:38, al; αὐ, καὶ αὐ. = οὗτος, ὁ δε (BL, §48, 1), Mat.14:2, Mrk.14:15, 44, Luk.1:22, 2:28, al. 2) In oblique cases (cl.), for the simple pron. of 3rd of person(s), he, she, it, Mat.7:9, 10:12, 26:44, al; with ptcp. in genitive absol, Mat.9:18, Mrk.13:1, al. (for irreg. constructions, V. Bl, §74, 5); pleonastically after the relative (cf. Heb. אֲשֶׁר לוֹ; WM, 184ff; Bl, §50, 4; MM, see word), Mrk.7:25, Rev.3:8, 7:2, al; in constr. ad sensum, without proper subject expressly indicated, Mat.4:23, Act.8:5, 2Co.2:13, al; genitive αὐτοῦ = ἐκείνου, Rom.11:11, 1Th.2:19, Tit.3:5, Heb.2:4. 3) ὁ, ἡ, τὸ αὐ, the same: Heb.1:12, 13:8; τὸ αὐ, ποιεῖν, Mat.5:46, 47, al; φρονεῖν, Rom.12:16, 15:5, Php.2:2, al; τὰ αὐ, Act.15:27, Rom.2:1, al; κατὰ τὸ (τὰ) αὐ. (MM, see word), Act.14:1, Luk.6:23, al; ἐπὶ τὸ αὐ, together (MM, see word), Mat.22:34, Act.1:15, al; ἓν κ. τὸ αὐ, 1Co.11:5, 12:11; with dative (cl.), 1Co.11:5; with a noun, λόγος, Mrk.14:39; μέτρος, Php.1:30; πνεῦμα, 1Co.12:4. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek Personal Pronoun (3rd person)
Definition:
αὐτός (Cretan dialect ἀϝτός [Refs] (also αὐτόν[Refs], reflexive pronoun, self:—in oblique cases used for the personal pronoun, him, her, it:—with Article, ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό (also ταὐτόν), etc, the very one, the same. I) self, myself, thyself, etc, accusative to the person of the Verb: frequently joined with ἐγώ, σύ, etc. (see. below 10), I.1) one's true self, the soul, not the body, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; reversely, body, not soul, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; oneself, as opposed to others who are less prominent, as king to subject, [Refs]; man to wife and children, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; warrior to horses, [Refs 8th c.BC+], or to weapons, [Refs]; shepherd to herd, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; seamen to ships, [Refs]: generally, whole to parts,[Refs 5th c.BC+]: absolutely, the Master, as in the [Refs 4th c.BC+] Latin Ipse dixit; so τίς οὗτος;— Αὐτός, i.e. Socrates, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀναβόησον Αὐτόν[Refs]the Master, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the result will show, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially αὐτὸ δείξει[Refs 5th c.BC+]; of things, the very, ὑπὸ λόφον αὐτόν, i.e. just, exactly under, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρὸς αὐταῖς ταῖς θύραις close by the door, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ δέον the very thing needed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ περίορθρον the point of dawn, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ τὰ ἐναντία the very opposite, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even, οὔ μοι μέλει ἄλγος οὔτ᾽ αὐτῆς Ἑκάβης[Refs 8th c.BC+] —In these senses αὐτός in Prose either precedes both the _Article_ and substantive, or follows both, e.g. αὐτὸς ὁ υἱός or ὁ υἱὸς αὐτός. The Article is sometimes omitted with proper names, or Nouns denoting individuals, αὐτὸς Μένων[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) of oneself, of one's own accord, ἀλλά τις αὐ. ἴτω[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also, in person, τῶν πραγμάτων ὑμῖν. αὐτοῖς ἀντιληπτέον[Refs 4th c.BC+] I.3) by oneself or itself, alone, αὐτός περ ἐών although alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς ἐγείναο παῖδ᾽, i.e. without a mother,[Refs 8th c.BC+]by himself, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ γάρ ἐσμεν we are by ourselves, i.e. among friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ γὰρ ἔστιν ταῦτα these and no others, [Refs 5th c.BC+] himself alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς μόνος, see at {μόνος} II; αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτόν, see at {ἑαυτοῦ}. I.4) in Philosophy, by or in itself, of an abstract concept or idea, δίκαιον αὐτό[Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently in this sense, attached to Nouns of all genders, οὐκ αὐτὸ δικαιοσύνην ἐπαινοῦντες ἀλλὰ τὰς ἀπ᾽ αὐτῆς εὐδοκιμήσεις[Refs 5th c.BC+]; more fully, εἰ αὐτὸ τοῦτο πατέρα ἠρώτων, ἆρα ὁ πατήρ ἐστι πατήρ τινος, ἢ ο; [Refs]; ἀδελφός, αὐτὸ τοῦτο ὅπερ ἔστιν the ideal, abstract brother, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; less frequently agreeing with the substantive, ἵνα αὐτὴ δικαιοσύνη πρὸς ἀδικίαν αὐτὴν κριθείη[Refs 5th c.BC+]its very self, [Refs] I.5) in dative with substantive, in one, together, ἀνόρουσεν αὐτῇ σὺν φόρμιγγι he sprang up lyre in hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτῇ σὺν πήληκι κάρη helmet and all,[Refs 8th c.BC+] men and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοῖσι συμμάχοισι allies and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.6) added to ordinal Numbers, e.g. πέμπτος αὐτός himself the fifth, i. e. himself with four others, [NT+5th c.BC+] I.7) frequently coupled with οὗτος, τοῦτ᾽ αὐτό ἐστι τὸ ζητηθέν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταῦτα ἥκω αὐτὰ ἵνα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.8) καὶ αὐτός himself too, [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.9) repeated in apodosi for emphasis, αὐτὸς ἐπαγγειλάμενος σώσειν. αὐτὸς ἀπώλεσεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10) in connexion with the person. pronoun, ἐγὼν αὐτός[Refs 8th c.BC+]; followed by an enclitic pronoun, αὐτόν μιν[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.b) with person. pronoun omitted, αὐτός. ἧσθαι λιλαίομαι, for ἐγὼ αὐτός, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸν ἐλέησον, for ἐμὲ αὐτόν,[Refs 8th c.BC+] is simply a strengthened form of ο; and so in Attic dialect, when σὲ αὐτόν, ἐμοὶ αὐτῷ, etc, are read divisim, they are emphatic, not reflexive; in this case αὐτός generally precedes the person. pronoun,[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.c) with the reflexive ἑαυτοῦ, αὑτοῦ, etc, to add force and definiteness, αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτοῦ[Refs 4th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ ὑφ᾽ αὑτῶν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; sometimes between the Article and reflexive pronoun, τοῖς αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ πήμασιν βαρύνεται[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.d) αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶν with possessive pronoun, πατρὸς κλέος ἠδ᾽ ἐμὸν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοῖς οἷσιν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.e) αὐτὸς ἑαυτοῦ with comparative and superlative adjective, αὐτὸς ἑωυτοῦ ῥέει πολλῷ ὑποδεέστερος[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.11) αὐτός for ὁ αὐτός, the same, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in later Prose, αὐταῖς ταῖς ἡμέραις[NT+2nd c.AD+] I.12) comparative αὐτότερος[Refs 5th c.BC+]: superlative αὐτότατος his very self, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. adverb, comparative αὐτοτέρως[Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) he, she, it, for the simple pronoun of 3 person, only in oblique cases (except in later Gk, [NT], and rarely first in a sentence, [NT+5th c.BC+]: rare in Epic dialect, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and mostly emphatic,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in Prose, to recall a Noun used earlier in the sentence, ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν βασιλέα. οὐκ οἶδα ὅ τι δεῖ αὐτὸν ὀμόσαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; after a Relative, ὅς κε θεοῖς ἐπιπείθηται. ἔκλυον αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially where a second Verb requires a change of case in the pronoun, οἳ ἂν ἐξελεγχθῶσι. ὡς προδότας αὐτοὺς ὄντας τιμωρηθῆναι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; later, pleonastically after a Relative, ὧν ὁ μὲν αὐτῶν[NT+5th c.BC+] III) with Article ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό, and Attic dialect contraction αὑτός, αὑτή, ταὐτό and ταὐτόν (as required by the metre,[Refs 5th c.BC+] plural neuter ταὐτ; Ionic dialect ὡυτός, τὠυτό:—the very one, the same, rare in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with dative, to denote sameness or agreement, especially in Prose, τὠυτὸ ἂν ὑμῖν ἐπρήσσομεν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ αὐτὸς τῷ λίθῳ the same as the stone, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ταὐτῷ εἶναί τινι to be in the place with, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσίεσθαί τινα ἐς ταὐτὸ ἑαυτῷ to have a person meet one,[Refs 5th c.BC+]face to face, [Refs 4th c.AD+] III.2) in later Greek, the said, the above-named, Ἡρώδης ὁ αὐ.[Refs 3rd c.BC+] IV) Adverbial phrases: IV.1) αὐτὸ μόνον simply, merely, [Refs 1st c.AD+] IV.2) αὐτό as adverb, ={ἄρτι}, [Refs] IV.3) αὐτὸ τοῦτο as adverb, [NT+2nd c.BC+] IV.4) with Preps, ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτό added together, making a total, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; κατὰ τὸ αὐτό together, at the same time,[NT], etc; but κατ᾽ αὐτό just then, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) In Compos: V.1) of or by oneself, self-, as in αὐτοδίδακτος, αὐτογνώμων, αὐτόματος: and so, independently, as in αὐτοκράτωρ, αὐτόνομος. V.2) hence, as a second self, very, bodily, as with proper names, Αὐτοθαΐς. V.3) in the abstract, the ideal, see above[Refs] V.4) precisely, as in αὐτόδεκα. V.5) rarely with reflexive sense of ἀλλήλων, as in αὐτοκτονέω. V.6) in one piece with, together with, as in αὐτόκωπος, αὐτοχείλης, αὐτόπρεμνος, αὐτόρριζος. V.7) by itself: hence, only, as in αὐτόξυλος, αὐτόποκος.—For αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶς, etc, see the respective Arts.
Strongs
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autós
Pronounciation:
ow-tos'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative g1438 (ἑαυτοῦ)) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons; her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which; from the particle (perhaps akin to the base of g109 (ἀήρ) through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward)

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