Strong's Enhanced Concordance

The Aionian Bible un-translates and instead transliterates ten special words to help us better understand the extent of God’s love for individuals and all mankind, and the nature of afterlife destinies. The original translation is unaltered and an inline note is appended to 63 Old Testament and 200 New Testament verses. Compare the definitions below to the Aionian Glossary. Follow the blue link below to study the word's usage. Search for any Strong's number: g1-21369 and h1-9049.
foot
Strongs:
g4228
Word:
πούς
Tyndale
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
pous
Gloss:
foot
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πούς, ποδός, ὁ [in LXX chiefly for רֶגֶל;] a foot, both of men and beasts: Mat.4:6 (LXX), Mrk.9:45, Luk.1:79, Jhn.11:44, Act.7:5, al; ὑπο τοὺς π, Rom.16:20, 1Co.15:25 15:27 Eph.1:22, Heb.2:8; ὑποκάτω τῶν π, Mat.22:44 (LXX); πρὸς (παρὰ) τοὺς π, Mrk.5:22, Luk.8:41, al; figuratively, Mat.15:30, Luk.10:39, Act.5:2, al; ἔμπροσθεν τῶν π, Rev.3:9 19:10, al; ἐπὶ τοὺς π, Act.10:25. By meton, of a person in motion (Psa.119:101): Luk.1:79, Act.5:9, Rom.3:15 10:15, Heb.12:13 (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
pous
Gloss:
foot
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πούς, ὁ, ποδός, ποδί, πόδα (not ποῦν, Thom.Mag.p.257 R.): dative plural ποσί, Epic dialect and Lyric poetry ποσσί (also [Refs 5th c.BC+] once πόδεσι [Refs 5th c.BC+] Epic dialect ποδοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—Doric dialect nominative πός (compare ἀρτίπος, πούλυπος, etc.) [Refs], but πούς [Refs]; πῶς· πός, ὑπὸ Δωριέων, [Refs 5th c.AD+] (perhaps πός· πούς, ὑ.Δ.); Laconian dialect πόρ, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]:—foot, both of men and beasts, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in plural, also, a bird's talons, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; arms or feelers of a polypus, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: properly the foot from the ankle down wards, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ξύλινος π, of an artificial foot, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but also of the leg with the foot, as χείρ for the arm and hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 2) foot as that with which one runs, πόδας ὠκὺς Ἀχιλλεύς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; frequently with reference to swiftness, περιγιγνόμεθ᾽ ἄλλων πύξ τε. ἠδὲ πόδεσσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποσὶν ἐρίζειν to race on foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποδῶν τιμά, αἴγλα, ἀρετά, ὁρμά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (ποσσί, πόδεσσι) is added to many Verbs denoting motion, π. βήσετο, παρέδραμον, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also emphatically with Verbs denoting to trample or tread upon, πόσσι καταστείβοισι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; πόδα βαίνειν, see at {βαίνω} [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πόδα τιθέναι to journey, [Refs 5th c.BC+] started on its homeward way, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χειρῶν ἔκβαλλον ὀρείους πόδας ναός, i. e. oars, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φωνὴ τῶν π. τοῦ ὑετοῦ sound of the pattering of rain, [LXX] 3) as a point of measurement, ἐς πόδας ἐκ κεφαλῆς from head to foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4) πρόσθε ποδός or ποδῶν, προπάροιθε ποδῶν, just before one, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4.b) παρά or πὰρ ποδός off-hand, at once, ἀνελέσθαι πὰρ ποδός [Refs 6th c.BC+]close at hand, [Refs]; but παραὶ ποσὶ κάππεσε θυμός sank to their feet, [Refs 8th c.BC+]in a moment, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; close behind, Νέμεσις δέ γε πὰρ πόδας (to be read πόδα) βαίνει Prov. cited in [Refs]; also παρὰ πόδας immediately afterwards [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; τὰ ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ καὶ παρὰ πόδας at his very feet, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.c) ἐν ποσί in one's way, close at hand, τὸν ἐν π. γινόμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]everyday matters, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.d) τὸ πρὸς ποσί, ={τὸ ἐν ποσί}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.e) all these phrases are opposed to ἐκ ποδῶν out of the way, far off, written ἐκποδών [Refs 5th c.BC+] 5) to denote close pursuit, ἐκ ποδὸς ἕπεσθαι follow in the track, i.e. close behind, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 5.b) in earlier writers κατὰ πόδας on the heels of a person, [LXX+5th c.BC+]on the moment, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ κατὰ πόδας ἡμέρα the very next day, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] catch it running, [Refs 5th c.BC+] march, come close at his heels, on his track, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῇ κατὰ π. ἡμέρᾳ τῆς ἐκκλησίας on the day immediately after it, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 6) various phrases: 6.a) ἀνὰ πόδα backwards, [Refs 5th c.AD+] 6.b) ἐπὶ πόδα backwards facing the enemy, ἐπὶ π. ἀναχωρεῖν, ἀνάγειν, ἀναχάζεσθαι, to retire without turning to fly, leisurely, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but γίνεται ἡ ἔξοδος οἷον ἐπὶ πόδας the offspring is as it were born feetforemost, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 6.c) περὶ πόδα, properly of a shoe, round the foot, i.e. fitting exactly, ὡς ἔστι μοι τὸ χρῆμα τοῦτο περὶ πόδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.d) ὡς ποδῶνἔχει as he is off for feet, i. e. as quick as he can, ὡς ποδῶν εἶχον [τάχιστα] ἐβοήθεον [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.e) ἔξω τινὸς πόδα ἔχειν keep one's foot out of a thing, i. e. be clear of it, ἔξω κομίζων πηλοῦ πόδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.f) ἀμφοῖν ποδοῖν, etc, to denote energetic action, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τερπωλῆς ἐπέβημεν ὅλῳ ποδί with all the foot, i.e. entirely, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.g) τὴν ὑπὸ πόδα [κατάστασιν] just below them, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ὑπὸ πόδας τίθεσθαι trample under foot, scorn, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; οἱ ὑπὸ πόδα those next below them (in rank), [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ὑπὸ πόδα χωρεῖν recede, decline, of strength, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] middle cited in [Refs 4th c.AD+] 6.h) for ὀρθῷ ποδί, see at {ὀρθός} [Refs] 6.k) ἁλιεῖς ἀπὸ ποδός probably fishermen who fish from the land, not from boats, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ποτίσαι ἀπὸ ποδός perhaps irrigate by the feet (of oxen turning the irrigation-wheel), [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; τόπον. ἀπὸ ποδὸς ἐξηρτισμένον uncertain meaning in [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 1) ἀγγεῖον. τρήματα ἐκ τῶν ὑπὸ ποδὸς ἔχον round the bottom, [Refs 1st c.AD+] 7) πούς τινος, as periphrastic for a person as coming, etc, σὺν πατρὸς μολὼν ποδί, i.e. σὺν πατρί, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ἐξ ἑνὸς ποδός, i.e. μόνος ὤν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ δ᾽ ἀφ᾽ ἡσύχου π, i.e. οἱ ἡσύχως ζῶντες, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) metaphorically, of things, foot, lowest part, especially foot of a hill, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of a table, couch, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare πέζ; of the side strokes at the foot of the letter Ω, Callias cited in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ={ποδεών}[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) in a ship, πόδες are the two lower corners of the sail, or the ropes fastened therelo, by which the sails are tightened or slackened, sheets [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χαλᾶν πόδα ease off the sheet, as is done when a squall is coming, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦ ποδὸς παρίει let go hold of it, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐκπετάσουσι πόδα ναός (with reference to the sail), [Refs 5th c.BC+] haul it tight, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ναῦς ἐνταθεῖσα ποδί a ship with her sheet close hauled, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2.b) perhaps of the rudder or steering-paddle, αἰεὶ γὰρ πόδα νηὸς ἐνώμων [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) a foot, as a measure of length, = [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) foot in Prosody, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so of a metrical phrase or passage, ἔκμετρα καὶ ὑπὲρ τὸν π. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of a long passage declaimed in one breath, κήρυκες ὅταν τὸν καλούμενον πόδα μέλλωσιν ἐρεῖν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) boundary stone, [Refs 4th c.BC+]. (Cf. Latin pes, Gothic fotus, etc. 'foot'; related to πέδον as noted by [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
poús
Pronounciation:
pooce
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a "foot" (figuratively or literally); foot(-stool); a primary word;