< റോമർ 10:3 >

3 അവർ ദൈവത്തിന്റെ നീതി അറിയാതെ സ്വന്ത നീതി സ്ഥാപിക്കുവാൻ അന്വേഷിച്ചുകൊണ്ട് ദൈവത്തിന്റെ നീതിയ്ക്ക് കീഴ്പെട്ടില്ല.
Being ignorant of
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ἀγνοέω
Greek:
ἀγνοοῦντες
Transliteration:
agnoountes
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
be ignorant
Morphhology:
Verb Present Active Participle Nominative Plural Masculine
Grammar:
an ACTION that is happening - done by male people or things that are doing something
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἀγνοέω
Transliteration:
agnoeō
Gloss:
be ignorant
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἀγνοέω, -ῶ (> ἁγνίζω), [in LXX for שָׁגָה, שָׁגַג, אָשַׁם, etc;] 1) to be ignorant, not to know: absol, Ι Ti 1:13, Heb.5:2; with accusative, Act.13:27 17:23, Rom.10:3, 2Co.2:11; ἐν οἷς, 2Pe.2:12; before ὅτι, Rom.2:4 6:3 7:1, 1Co.14:38; οὐ θέλω ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν, a Pauline phrase: with accusative, Rom.11:25; before ὑπέρ, 2Co.1:8; περί, 1Co.12:1, 1Th.4:13. ὅτι, Rom.1:13, 1Co.10:1 (for similar usage in π, V. MM, VGT, see word). Pass: 1Co.14:38, 2Co.6:9, Gal.1:22. 2) not to understand: with accusative, Mrk.9:32, Luk.9:45. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἀγνοέω
Transliteration:
agnoeō
Gloss:
be ignorant
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἀγνο-έω, Epic dialect ἀγνοι, 3rd.pers.singular subjunctive ἀγνοιῇσι[Refs 8th c.BC+]: imperfect ἠγνόουν[Refs 5th c.BC+]: future ἀγνοήσω[Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist ἠγνόησα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect ἠγνοίησα[Refs 8th c.BC+], Epic dialect contraction 3rd.pers.singular ἀγνώσασκε[Refs 8th c.BC+]: perfect ἠγνόηκα[Refs 5th c.BC+] —passive, future (of middle form) ἀγνοήσομαι[Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀγνοηθήσομαι variant in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]aorist ἠγνοήθην, see below: perfect ἠγνόημαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]:—not to perceive or recognize; [Refs 8th c.BC+] ost always in aorist, ἄνδρ᾽ ἀγνοιήσασ᾽ ὑλάει[Refs 8th c.BC+]; mostly with negative, οὐκ ἠγνοίησεν he perceived or knew well, [Refs 8th c.BC+]—Mostly with accusative, to be ignorant of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἑαυτοὺς ἀ. forget their former selves, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὴν πόλιν ἀ. not to discern the temper of the city, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; fail to understand, τὸ ῥῆμα[NT+5th c.BC+]: dependent clauses in participle, τίς. ἀ. τὸν ἐκεῖθεν πόλεμον δεῦρο ἥξοντ;[Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, not to be known, recognized, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἠγνοῆσθαι ξύμπασιν ὅτι. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; καιρὸν οὐ παρεθέντα οὐδ᾽ ἀγνοηθέντα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἠγνοημένα unknown parts, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) absolutely, go wrong, make a false step, first in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle ἀγνοῶν ignorantly, by mistake, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in moral sense, to be ignorant of what is right, act amiss, [NT+2nd c.BC+]:—middle, fail to recognize, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
ἀγνοέω
Transliteration:
agnoéō
Pronounciation:
ag-no-eh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
not to know (through lack of information or intelligence); by implication, to ignore (through disinclination); (be) ignorant(-ly), not know, not understand, unknown; from g1 (Α) (as a negative particle) and g3539 (νοιέω)

for
Strongs:
Lexicon:
γάρ
Greek:
γὰρ
Transliteration:
gar
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
γάρ
Transliteration:
gar
Gloss:
for
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
γάρ, co-ordinating particle, contr. of γε ἄρα, verily then, hence, in truth, indeed, yea, then, why, and when giving a reason or explanation, for, the usage in NT being in general accord with that of cl; 1) explicative and epexegetic: Mat.4:18 19:12, Mrk.1:16 5:42 16:4, Luk.11:3 o, Rom.7:1, 1Co.16:5, al. 2) Conclusive, in questions, answers and exclamations: Mat.9:5 27:23, Luk.9:25 22:27, Jhn.9:30, Act.8:31 16:37 19:35, Rom.15:26, 1Co.9:10, Php.1:18 (Ellic, in l.), 1Th.2:20, al. 3) Causal: Mat.1:21 2:2, 5, 6, 3:23, Mrk.1:22, 9:6, Luk.1:15, 18, Jhn.2:25, Act.2:25, Rom.1:9, 11, 1Co.11:5, Rev.1:3, al; giving the reason for a command or prohibition, Mat.2:20 3:9, Rom.13:11, Col.3:3, 1Th.4:3, al; where the cause is contained in an interrog. statement, Luk.22:27, Rom.3:3 4:3, 1Co.10:29; καὶ γάρ, for also, Mrk.10:45, Luk.6:32, 1Co.5:7, al. id. as in cl. = etenim, where the καί loses its connective force (Bl, §78, 6; Kühner 3, ii, 854f.), Mrk.14:70, Luk.1:66 22:37, 2Co.13:4. The proper place of γάρ is after the first word in a clause, but in poets it often comes third or fourth, and so in late prose: 2Co.1:19. Yet "not the number but the nature of the word after which it stands is the point to be noticed" (see Thayer, see word). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
γάρ
Transliteration:
gar
Gloss:
for
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
γάρ (γε, ἄρα), causal conjunction, used alone or with other Particles. I) introducing the reason or cause of what precedes, for, τῷ γὰρ ἐπὶ φρεσὶ θῆκε θεὰ λευκώλενος Ἥρη· κήδετο γ. Δαναῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but frequently in explanation of that which is implied in the preceding clause, πολλάων πολίων κατέλυσε κάρηνα. τοῦ γὰρ κράτος ἐστὶ μέγιστον [Refs] I.b) in simple explanations, especially after a Pronoun or demonstrative adjective, ἀλλὰ τόδ᾽ αἰνὸν ἄχος κραδίην καὶ θυμὸν ἱκάνει· Ἕκτωρ γ. ποτε φήσει [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ δὲ δεινότατον. ὁ Ζεὺς γ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in introducing proofs or examples, μαρτύριον δέ· Δήλου γ. καθαιρομένης. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τεκμήριον δέ· οὔτε γ. Λακεδαιμόνιοι. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in full, τεκμήριον δὲ τούτου τόδε· αἱ μὲν γ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παράδειγμα τόδε τοῦ λόγου· ἐκ γ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.c) to introduce a detailed description or narration already alluded to, ὅμως δὲ λεκτέα ἃ γιγνώσκω· ἔχει γ. [ἡ χώρα] πεδία κάλλιστα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.d) in answers to questions or statements challenging assent or denial, yes, no. , οὔκουν. ἀνάγκη ἐστ;—ἀνάγκη γ. οὖν, ἔφη, ay doubtless it is necessary, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἱκανὸς γ, ἔφη, συμβαίνει γ, ἔφη, [Refs]; οὔκουν δὴ τό γ᾽ εἰκός.—οὐ γ: [Refs] I.2) by inversion, preceding the fact explained, since, as, Ἀτρεΐδη, πολλοὶ γ. τεθνᾶσιν Ἀχαιοί. τῷ σε χρὴ πόλεμον παῦσαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χρόνου δὲ οὐ πολλοῦ διελθόντος (χρῆν γ. Κανδαύλῃ γενέσθαι κακῶς) ἔλεγε πρὸς τὸν Γύγην τοιάδε, Γύγη, οὐ γ. σε δοκέω πείθεσθαι. (ὦτα γ. τυγχάνει κτλ.), ποίει ὅκως. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἶεν, σὺ γ. τούτων ἐπιστήμων, τί χρὴ ποιεῖ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; the principal proposition is sometimes I.2.b) blended with the causal one, τῇ δὲ κακῶς γ. ἔδεε γενέσθαι εἶπε, i.e. ἡ δέ (κακῶς γ. οἱ ἔδεε γενέσθαι) εἶπε [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2.c) attached to the hypothet. Particle instead of being joined to the apodosis, οὐδ᾽ εἰ γ. ἦν τὸ πρᾶγμα μὴ θεήλατον, ἀκάθαρτον ὑμᾶς εἰκὸς ἦν οὕτως ἐᾶν, i.e. οὐδὲ γ. εἰ ἦν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2.d) repeated, οὐ γ. οὖν σιγήσομαι· ἔτικτε γ. [Refs] I.3) in elliptical phrases, where that of which γάρ gives the reason is omitted, and must be supplied, I.3.a) frequently in Trag. dialogue and [Refs 5th c.BC+], when yes or no may be supplied from the context, καὶ δῆτ᾽ ἐτόλμας τούσδ᾽ ὑπερβαίνειν νόμου;—οὐ γ. τί μοι Ζεὺς ἦν ὁ κηρύξας τάδε [yes], for it was not Zeus, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in phrase ἔστι γ. οὕτω [yes], for so it is, i. e. yes certainly: λέγεταί τι καινό; γένοιτο γ. ἄν τι καινότερον ἢ; [why,] could there be? [Refs 5th c.BC+] [do so], yet shall ye never prevail by this means: for ἀλλὰ γ, see below[Refs] I.3.b) to confirm or strengthen something said, οἵδ᾽ οὐκέτ᾽ εἰσί· τοῦτο γάρ σε δήξεται [I say this], for it will sting thee, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: after an Exclamation, ὦ πόποι· ἀνάριθμα γ. φέρω πήματα [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.3.c) in conditional propositions, where the condition is omitted, else, οὐ γ. ἄν με ἔπεμπον πάλιν (i.e. εἰ μὴ ἐπίστευον) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; γίνεται γ. ἡ κοινωνία συμμαχία for in that case, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I.4) in abrupt questions, why, what, τίς γ. σε θεῶν ἐμοὶ ἄγγελον ἧκε; why who hath sent thee? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πατροκτονοῦσα γ. ξυνοικήσεις ἐμο; what, wilt thou? [Refs 4th c.BC+]; what, was it? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί γ; quid enim? i. e. it must be so, [Refs]; τί γ. δή ποτ; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; also πῶς γ; πῶς γ. ο;, see at {πῶς}. I.5) to strengthen a wish, with optative, κακῶς γ. ἐξόλοιο O that you might perish! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare αἴ, εἰ, εἴθε, πῶς. II) joined with other Particles: II.1) ἀλλὰ γ. where γάρ gives the reason of a clause to be supplied between ἀλλά and itself, as ἀλλ᾽ ἐν γὰρ Τρώων πεδίῳ. but [far otherwise], for, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἥκουσ᾽ αἵδ᾽ ἐπὶ πρᾶγος πικρόν but [hush], for, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὐ γ. σ᾽ ἐθέλω. but [look out] for, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) γ. ἄρα for indeed, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) γ. δή for of course, for you know, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; φάμεν γ. δή yes certainly we say so, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4) γ. νυ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.5) γ. οὖν for indeed, to confirm or explain, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; φησὶ γ. οὖν yes of course he says so, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare τοιγαροῦν. II.6) γ. που for I suppose, especially with negatives, [Refs] II.7) γ. ῥα, ={γὰρ ἄρα}, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.8) γ. τε, [Refs]; also τε γ. [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.9) γ. τοι for surely, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; compare τοιγάρτοι. B) POSITION: γάρ properly stands after the first word in a clause, but in Pocts it frequently stands third or fourth, when the preceding words are closely connected, as ὁ μὲν γὰρ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χἠ ναῦς γὰρ. [Refs]; τό τ᾽ εἰκαθεῖν γὰρ. [Refs]; τὸ μὴ θέμις γὰρ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]: sometimes for metrical reasons, where there is no such connexion, as third [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in later Comedy texts fifth [Refs 4th c.BC+]; once sixth in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) inserted before the demonstrative -ί, as νυνγαρί for νυνὶ γά; compare νυνί. C) QUANTITY: γάρ is sometimes long in [Refs 8th c.BC+].—In Attic dialect always short: [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
γάρ
Transliteration:
gár
Pronounciation:
gar
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles); and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet; a primary particle

the
Strongs:
Lexicon:
Greek:
τὴν
Transliteration:
tēn
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC female person or thing that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

<the>
Strongs:
Lexicon:
Greek:
τοῦ
Transliteration:
tou
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Genitive Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that something belongs to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

of God
Strongs:
Lexicon:
θεός
Greek:
θεοῦ
Transliteration:
theou
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
God
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Singular Masculine Title
Grammar:
a proper name of a male PERSON OR THING that something belongs to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
θεός
Transliteration:
theos
Gloss:
God
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male/Female
Definition:
θεός, -οῦ, ὁ, ἡ (Act.19:37 only; see M, Pr., 60, 244), late voc, θεέ (Mat.27:46; cf. Deu.3:24, al.), [in LXX chiefly for אֱלֹהִים, also for אֵל and other cognate forms, יהוה, etc;] a god or deity, God. 1) In polytheistic sense, a god or deity: Act.28:6, 1Co.8:4, 2Th.2:4, al; pl, Ac. 14:11 19:26, Gal.4:8, al. 2) Of the one true God; (a) anarthrous: Mat.6:24, Luk.20:38, al; esp. with prep. (Kühner 3, iii, 605), ἀπὸ θ, Jhn.3:2; ἐκ, Act.5:39, 2Co.5:1, Php.3:9; ὑπό, Rom.13:1; παρὰ θεοῦ, Jhn.1:6; παρὰ θεῷ, 2Th.1:6, 1Pe.2:4; κατὰ θεόν, Rom.8:27, 2Co.7:9, 10; also when in genitive dependent on an anarth. noun (Bl, §46, 6), Mat.27:43, Luk.3:2, Rom.1:17, 1Th.2:13; as pred, Lk 20:38, Jhn.1:1, and when the nature and character rather than the person of God is meant, Act.5:29, Gal.2:6, al. (M, Th., 14); (b) more freq, with art: Mat.1:23, Mrk.2:7, al. mult; with prep, ἀπὸ τ. θ, Luk.1:26; ἐκ, Jhn.8:42, al; παρὰ τοῦ θ, Jhn.8:40; π. τῷ θ, Rom.9:14; ἐν, Col.3:3; ἐπὶ τῷ θ, Luk.1:47; ἐπὶ τὸν θ, Act.15:19; εἰς τ. θ, Act.24:15; πρὸς τ. θ, Jhn.1:2; with genitive of person(s), Mat.22:32, Mrk.12:26, 27, Luk.20:37, Jhn.20:17, al; ὁ θ. μου, Rom.1:8, Php 1:3, al; ὁ θ. καὶ πατήρ κ. τ. λ, Rom.15:6, Eph.1:3, Phi 4:20, al; with genitive of thing(s), Rom.15:5, 13, 33, 2Co.1:3, 1Th.5:23; τὰ τ. θεοῦ, Mat.16:23, Mrk.12:17, 1Co.2:11; τὰ πρὸς τὸν θ, Rom.15:17, Heb.2:17 5:1; τ. θεῷ, as a superl. (LXX, Jos.3:3), Act.7:20, 2Co.10:4; Hebraistically, of judges (Psa.81(82):6), Jhn.10:34 " (LXX), 35. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
θεός
Transliteration:
theos
Gloss:
God
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male/Female
Definition:
θεός, ὁ, Boeotian dialect θιός, Laconian dialect σιός (see. below), [Refs 5th c.AD+], Cretan dialect θιός [Refs], Doric dialect also θεύς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; vocative (only late) θεός, also θεέ [LXX+NT]; but classical in compound names, Ἀμφίθεε, Τιμόθεε:—God, the Deity, in general sense, both singular and plural (εἰ καὶ ἐπὶ θεοὺς καὶ ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐπὶ θεὸν ἁρμόζει μεταφέρειν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὺν θ. εἰρημένον [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so in plural, σύν γε θεοῖσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ θεῶν ἄτερ pi.[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὑπὲρ θεόν against his will,[Refs 4th c.BC+]; θεῶν συνεθελόντων, βουλομένων, [Refs 5th c.BC+]bless you! good heavens! for heaven's sake! [Refs 8th c.BC+]: doubled in poets, θεὸν θεόν τις ἀγλαϊζέτω [Refs 5th c.BC+]; θεοί (Cretan dialect θιοί) as an opening formula in Inscrr. (i.e. τύχην ἀγαθὴν διδοῖεν), [Refs].1, etc: in Prose also with the Article, ὁ θ. πάντων ἂν εἴη αἴτιος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ πρὸς τοὺς θ, τὰ παρὰ τῶν θ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] b) θεοί, opposed to ἄνδρες, πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in singular, θεῷ ἐναλίγκιος αὐδήν [Refs 8th c.BC+], of an 'angel's visit', [Refs 3rd c.BC+] c) of special divinities, νέρτεροι θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐνέρτεροι θ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἱ κάτωθεν θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ δώδεκα θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὰ τοὺς δώδεκα θ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in dual, τὼ σιώ (Laconian dialect), of Castor and Pollux, ναὶ τὼ σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] d) ὁ θ, of natural phenomena, ὁ θ. ὕει (i.e. Ζεύς) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔσεισεν ὁ θ. (i.e. Ποσειδῶν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of the sun, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δύνοντος τοῦ θ. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; the weather, τί δοκεῖ τὰ τοῦ θεο; [Refs 4th c.BC+] e) Astrology texts, θεοί,= ἀστέρες, [Refs 4th c.AD+] f) θεός (i.e. Ἥλιος), name of the 9th τόπος, Rhetor.[Refs] 2) metaphorically, of abstract things, τὸ δ᾽ εὐτυχεῖν τόδ᾽ ἐν βροτοῖς θεός τε καὶ θεοῦ πλέον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ πλοῦτος τοῖς σοφοῖς θ. [Refs]; φθόνος κάκιστος θ. [Refs] 3) as title of rulers, θεῶν ἀδελφῶν (i.e. Ptolemy Il and Arsinoe), [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ἀντίοχος ὅτῳ θεὸς ἐπώνυμον γίγνεται [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; θεὸς ἐκ θεοῦ, of Augustus, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 3.b) = Latin Divus, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; οἱ ἐν θεοῖς αὐτοκράτορες,= divi Imperatores, [Refs] 3.c) generally of the dead, καὶ ζῶντός σου καὶ εἰς θεοὺς ἀπελθόντος [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; θεοῖς χθονίοις,= Latin Dis Manibus, [Refs] 4) one set in authority, judge, τὸ κριτήριον τοῦ θ, ἐνώπιον τοῦ θ, [LXX] II) θεός feminine, goddess, μήτε θήλεια θεός, μήτε τις ἄρσην [Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially at Athens, of Athena, Decrees cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἁ Διὸς θεός, Ζηνὸς ἡ θ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of other goddesses, ποντία θεός [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ νερτέρα θ,= Περσεφόνη, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of Thetis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of Niobe, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in dual, of Demeter and Persephone, τὰ τοῖν θεοῖν ψηφίσματα [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) as adjective in comparative θεώτερος, divine, θύραι θ, opposed to καταιβαταὶ ἀνθρώποισιν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χορὸς θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (κόσμῳ θέντες τὰ πρήγματα), by [Refs 5th c.BC+] [In Epic dialect (twice in [Refs 8th c.BC+], as monosyllable by synizesis, θεοί [Refs 8th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
θεός
Transliteration:
theós
Pronounciation:
theh'-os
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very; X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward); of uncertain affinity; a deity, especially (with g3588 (ὁ)) the supreme Divinity

righteousness
Strongs:
Lexicon:
δικαιοσύνη
Greek:
δικαιοσύνην
Transliteration:
dikaiosunēn
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Gloss:
righteousness
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
δικαιοσύνη, -ης, ἡ (δίκαιος), [in LXX chiefly for צֶדֶק, and cognates, Gen.15:6, al, rarely for חֶסֶד, Gen.19:19;] the character of ὁ δίκαιος (which see) 1) in broad sense, righteousness, conformity to the Divine will in purpose, thought and action: Mat.5:6, Jhn.16:8, Act.13:10, Rom.4:3; λόγος δικαιοσύνης, teaching of r, Heb.5:13; βασιλεὺς δ. (cf. FlJ, BJ, vi, 10, β. δίκαιος), Heb.7:2; ὅπλα δ, Rom.6:13; ὁδὸς δ, Mat.21:32; θώραξ τῆς δ, Eph.6:14; διὰκονοι δ, 2Co.11:15; ὁσιότης καὶ δ, Luk.1:75, cf. Eph.4:24; ἀγαθωσύνῃ καὶ δ, Eph.5:9; δ. κ. εἰρήνη κ. χαρά, Rom.14:17; δ. κ. ἁγιασμός, 1Co.1:30; opposite to ἁμαρτία, Rom.8:10; ἀνομία, 2Co.6:14; άδικία, Rom.3:5; ποιεῖν τὴν δ, 1Jn.2:29 Jn 3:7; id. as an inclusive term for the active duties of the religious life (ICC, in l; Abbott, Essays, 73 ff), Mat.6:1; ἐργάζεσθαι δ, Act.10:35; διώκειν δ, 1Ti.6:11; πληροῦν πᾶσαν δ, Mat.3:15; ζῆν τῇ δ, 1Pe.2:24; δ. θεοῦ, a righteousness divine in its character and origin, Mat.6:33, Jas.1:20, (where it also includes the idea of God's personal r; see ICC, on Rom.1:17) Rom.1:17 3:5, 21-26 10:3, 2Co.5:21, Php.3:9; ἡ δ. τ. πίσιεως, Rom.4:11; ἡ ἐκ π. δ, Rom.9:30; ἡ κατὰ π. δ, Heb.11:7; opposite to this is ἡ ἐκ νόμου δ, Rom.10:5; ἡ δ. ἐν ν, Php.3:6; ἡ ἰδία δ, Rom.10:3, cf. Php.3:9 2) In narrower sense (cf. δίκαιος), justice: Act.17:31, 2Pe.1:1, Rev.19:11 (DCG, ii, 529 ff; Cremer, 190, 690). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Gloss:
righteousness
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
δῐκαι-οσύνη, ἡ, righteousness, justice, [LXX+6th c.BC+]; δ. δικαστική legal justice, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; opposed to ἐπιείκεια, [Refs] 2) fulfilment of the Law, [LXX+NT] II) justice, the business of a judge, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) Δ, personified, [Refs] IV) [Refs 4th c.BC+] name for four, [Refs] V) δικαιοσύνη· ἡ χοῖνιξ, μυστικῶς, [Refs 5th c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosýnē
Pronounciation:
dik-ah-yos-oo'-nay
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
equity (of character or act); specially (Christian) justification; righteousness; from g1342 (δίκαιος)

and
Strongs:
Lexicon:
καί
Greek:
καὶ
Transliteration:
kai
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
καί
Transliteration:
kai
Gloss:
and
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
καί, conj., and I. Copulative. 1) Connecting single words; (a) in general: Mat.2:18, 16:1, Mrk.2:15, Luk.8:15, Heb.1:1, al. mult; repeated before each of the terms in a series, Mat.23:23, Luk.14:21, Rom.7:12, 9:4, al. (b) connecting numerals (WM, §37, 4): Jhn.2:20, Act.13:20; (with) joining terms which are not mutually exclusive, as the part with the whole: Mat.8:33, 26:59, Mrk.16:17, Act.5:29, al. 2) Connecting clauses and sentences: Mat.3:12, Act.5:21, al. mult; esp. (a) where, after the simplicity of the popular language, sentences are paratactically joined (WM, §60, 3; M, Pr., 12; Deiss, LAE, 128ff.): Mat.1:21, 7:25, Mrk.9:5, Jhn.10:3, al; (b) joining affirmative to negative sentences: Luk.3:14, Jhn.4:11, IIIJhn.10; (with) consecutive, and so: Mat.5:1, 23:32, Heb.3:19, al; after imperatives, Mat.4:19, Luk.7:7, al; (d) = καίτοι, and yet: Mat.3:14, 6:26, Mrk.12:12, Luk.18:7 (Field, Notes, 72), 1Co.5:2, al; (e) beginning an apodosis (= Heb. וְ; so sometimes δέ in cl.), then: Luk.2:21, 7:12, Act.1:10; beginning a question (WM, §53, 3a): Mrk.10:26, Luk.10:29, Jhn.9:36. 3) Epexegetic, and, and indeed, namely (WM, §53, 3c): Luk.3:18, Jhn.1:16, Act.23:6, Rom.1:5, 1Co.3:5, al. 4) In transition: Mat.4:23, Mrk.5:1, 21, Jhn.1:19, al; so, Hebraistically, καὶ ἐγένετο (וַי:הִי; also ἐγένετο δέ), Mrk.1:9 (cf. Luk.5:1; V. Burton, §§357-60; M, Pr., 14, 16). 5) καὶ. καί, both. and (for τε. καί, see: τε); (a) connecting single words: Mat.10:28, Mrk.4:41, Rom.11:33, al; (b) clauses and sentences: Mrk.9:13, Jhn.7:28, 1Co.1:22, al. II. Adjunctive, also, even, still: Mat.5:39, 40; Mrk.2:28, al. mult; esp. with pron, adv, etc, Mat.20:4, Jhn.7:47, al; ὡς κ, Act.11:17; καθὼς κ, Rom.15:7; οὑτω κ, Rom.6:11; διὸ κ, Luk.1:35; ὁ κ. (Deiss, BS, 313ff.), Act.13:9; pleonastically, μετὰ κ. (Bl, §77, 7; Deiss, BS, 265f,), Php.4:3; τί κ, 1 Co 15:29; ἀλλὰ κ, Luk.14:22, Jhn.5:18, al; καίγε (M, Pr., 230; Burton, §437), Act.17:27; καίπερ, Heb.5:8; κ. ἐάν, see: ἐάν. ἐάν, contr. fr. εἰ ἄν, conditional particle, representing something as "under certain circumstances actual or liable to happen," but not so definitely expected as in the case of εἰ with ind. (Bl, §65, 4; cf. Jhn.13:17, 1Co.7:36), if haply, if; 1) with subjc. (cl.); (a) pres: Mat.6:22, Luk.10:6, Jhn.7:17, Rom.2:25, 26 al; { (b) aor. (= Lat. fut. pf.): Mat.4:9 16:26 (cf. ptcp. in Luk.9:25; M, Pr., 230), Mrk.3:24, Luk.14:34, Jhn.5:43, Rom.7:2, al; = cl. εἰ, with opt, Jhn.9:22 11:57, Act.9:2; as Heb. אִם = ὅταν, Jhn.12:32 14:3, I Jhn.2:28 3:2, Heb.3:7 " (LXX). 2) C. indic, (as in late writers, fr. Arist. on; see WH, App., 171; VD, MGr. 2, App., §77; Deiss, BS, 201f, LAE, 155, 254; M, Pr., 168, 187; Bl, §65, 4); (a) fut: Mat.18:19 T, Luk.19:40, Act.7:7; (b) pres: 1Th.3:8 (see Milligan, in l.). 3) With other particles: ἐ. καί (Bl, §65, 6), Gal.6:1; ἐ. μή (M, Pr., 185, 187; Bl, l.with), with subjc. pres, Mat.10:13, 1Co.8:8, Jas.2:17, 1Jn.3:21; aor, Mat.6:15, Mrk.3:27, Jhn.3:3, Rom.10:15, Gal.1:8 2:16 (see Lft, Ellic, in ll.); ἐ. τε. ἐ. τε, [in LXX for אִם. אִם, Est.19:13, al,] Rom.14:8. 4) = cl. ἄν (which see) after relat. pronouns and adverbs (Tdf, Pr., 96; WH, App., 173; M, Pr., 42f; Bl, §26, 4; Mayser, 152f; Deiss, BS, 202ff.): ὃς ἐ, Mat.5:19, Mrk.6:22, 23 Luk.17:32, 1Co.6:18, al; ὅπου ἐ, Mat.8:19; ὁσάκις ἐ, Rev.11:6; οὗ ἐ, 1Co.16:6; καθὸ ἐ, 2Co.8:12; ὅστις ἐ, Gal.5:10. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
καί
Transliteration:
kai
Gloss:
and
Morphhology:
Greek Conjunction
Definition:
καί, conjunction, copulative, joining words and sentences, A) and; also adverb, even, also, just, frequently expressing emphatic assertion or assent, corresponding as positive to the negative οὐ (μή) or οὐδέ (μηδέ). copulative, and, A.I) joining words or sentences to those preceding, ἦ, καὶ κυανέῃσιν ἐπ᾽ ὀφρύσινεῦσε Κρονίων [Refs 8th c.BC+]: repeated with two or more Nouns, αἱ δὲ ἔλαφοι κ. δορκάδες κ. οἱ ἄγριοι οἶες κ. οἱ ὄνοι οἱ ἄγριοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; joining only the last pair, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ ὄχλος πλείων κ. πλείων ἐπέρρει more and more, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; to add epithets after πολύς, πολλὰ κ. ἐσθλά [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.I.2) to addalimiting or defining expression, πρὸς μακρὸν ὄρος κ. Κύνθιον ὄχθον to the mountain and specially to, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (sometimes in reverse order, πρὸς δῶμα Διὸς κ. μακρὸν Ὄλυμπον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; to add by way of climax, θεῶν. κ. Ποσειδῶνος all the gods, and above all. , [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently ἄλλοι τε καί, ἄλλως τε καί, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs]; ὀλίγου τινὸς ἄξια κ. οὐδενός little or nothing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. ταῦτα and this too. , γελᾶν ἀναπείθειν, κ. ταῦθ᾽ οὕτω πολέμιον ὄντα τῷ γέλωτι [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II) at the beginning of a sentence, A.II.1) in appeals or requests, καί μοι δὸς τὴν Χεῖρα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; καί μοι λέγε, καί μοι ἀπόκριναι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in Oratt, καί μοι λέγε. τὸ ψήφισμα, καί μοι ἀνάγνωθι, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.2) in questions, to introduce an objection or express surprise, κ. τίς τόδ᾽ ἐξίκοιτ᾽ ἂν ἀγγέλων τάχο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; κ. πῶς; pray how? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. δὴ τί; but then what? [Refs]; κ. ποῖον; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. τίς εἶδε πώποτε βοῦς κριβανίτα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κἄπειτ᾽ ἔκανε; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. τίς πώποτε Χαριζόμενος ἑτέρῳ τοῦτο εἰργάσατ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.3) ={καίτοι}, and yet, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.4) at the beginning of a speech, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III) after words implying sameness or like ness, as, γνώμῃσι ἐχρέωντο ὁμοίῃσι κ. σύ they had the same opinion as you, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἴσον or ἴσα κ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ἴσῳ (i.e. ἐστὶ) κ. εἰ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) after words implying comparison or opposition, αἱ δαπάναι οὐχ ὁμοίως κ. πρίν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.3) to express simultaneity, ἦν ἦμαρ δεύτερον, κἀγὼ κατηγόμην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παρέρχονταί τε μέσαι νύκτες κ. ψύχεται [τὸ ὕδωρ] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [οἱ Λακεδαιμόνιοι] οὐκ ἔφθασαν τὴν ἀρχὴν κατασχόντες κ. Θηβαίοις εὐθὺς ἐπεβούλευσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV) joining an affirmative clause with a negative, ἀλλ᾽ ὥς τι δράσων εἷρπε κοὐ θανούμενος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.V) καί, καί. correlative, not only, but also. , κ. ἀεὶ κ. νῦν, κ. τότε κ. νῦν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) by anacoluthon, ὣς φαμένη κ. κερδοσύνῃ ἡγήσατ᾽ Ἀθήνη, for ὣς ἔφη κ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἔρχεται δὲ αὐτή τε. κ. τὸν υἱὸν ἔχουσα, for κ. ὁ υἱός, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) even, also, just, B.1) τάχα κεν κ. ἀναίτιον αἰτιόῳτο even the innocent, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; δόμεναι κ. μεῖζον ἄεθλον an even greater prize, [Refs]full five,[Refs 5th c.BC+] two or three, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) also, κ. ἐγώ I also, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κ. αὐτοί they also, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἀγίας καὶ Σωκράτης κ. τούτω ἀπεθανέτην likewise died, [Refs]; in adding surnames, etc, Ὦχος ὁ κ. Δαρειαῖος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; nominative ὁ κ. first in [Refs 1st c.BC+], frequently later, [Refs 2nd c.AD+], etc; Ἰούδας ὁ κ. Μακκαβαῖος [NT+8th c.BC+]; εἴπερ τι κ. ἄλλο, ὥς τις κ. ἄλλος, [Refs 5th c.BC+], not only, but also. , see at {μόνος}; οὐδὲν μᾶλλον. ἢ οὐ καὶ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2.b) frequently used both in the antecedent and relative clause, where we put also in the antecedent only, εἰ μὲν κ. σὺ εἶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων ὧνπερ κ. ἐγώ [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.3) frequently in apodosi, after temporal Conjs, ἀλλ᾽ ὅτε δή ῥα, κ. τότε δή. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also after εἰ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: as a Hebraism, κ. ἐγένετο. κ. [LXX+NT] B.4) with Advs, to give emphasis, κ. κάρτα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. λίην full surely, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κ. πάλαι, κ. πάνυ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. μάλα, κ. σφόδρα, in answers, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.5) with words expressing a minimum, even so much as, were it but, just, ἱέμενος κ. καπνὸν ἀποθρῴσκοντα νοῆσαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷς ἡδὺ κ. λέγειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίς δὲ κ. προσβλέψετα; who will so much as look at you? [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.6) just, τοῦτ᾽ αὐτὸ κ. νοσοῦμεν 'tis just that that ails me, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: frequently with a relative, τὸ κ. κλαίουσα τέτηκα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; and how long ago was the city sacked? [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ποῦ καί σφε θάπτε; where is he burying her? [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.7) even, just, implying assent, ἔπειτά με κ. λίποι αἰών thereafter let life e'en leave me, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.8) κ. εἰ even if, of a whole condition represented as an extreme case, opposed to εἰ κ. although, notwithstanding that, of a condition represented as immaterial even if fulfilled,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ κ. ἠπιστάμην if I had been able, [Refs 5th c.BC+] each exert their force separtely, as εἴ περ ἀδειής τ᾽ ἐστί, καὶ εἰ. and if. [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.9) before a Participle, to represent either καὶ εἰ, or εἰ καί, although, albeit, Ἕκτορα κ. μεμαῶτα μάχης σχήσεσθαι ὀΐω, for ἢν κ. μεμάῃ, how much soever he rage, although he rage, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C) Position: καί and, is by Poets sometimes put after another word, ἔγνωκα, τοῖσδε κοὐδὲν ἀντειπεῖν ἔχω, for καὶ τοῖσδε οὐδέν [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.2) καί also, sometimes goes between a preposition and its case, ἐν κ. θαλάσσᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.3) very seldom at the end of a verse, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D) crasis: with ᾰ, as κἄν, κἀγαθοί, etc; with ε, as κἀγώ, κἄπειτα, etc, Doric dialect κἠγώ, κἤπειτα, etc; with η, as Χἠ, Χἠμέρη, Χἠμεῖς, etc; with ῐ in Χἰκετεύετε, Χἰλαρ; with ο, as Χὠ, Χὤστις, etc; with υ in Χὐμεῖς, Χὐποχείριον, etc; with ω in the pronoun ᾧ, Χ; with αι, as κᾀσχρῶ; with αυ, as καὐτό; with ει, as κεἰ, κεἰς (but also κἀς), κᾆτ; with εὐ, as κεὐγένεια, κεὐσταλή; with οι in Χοἰ (Χᾠ [Refs]; with ου in Χοὖτος, κοὐ, κοὐδέ, and the like.
Strongs
Word:
καί
Transliteration:
kaí
Pronounciation:
kahee
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words; and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet; apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force

the
Strongs:
Lexicon:
Greek:
τὴν
Transliteration:
tēn
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC female person or thing that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

[their] own
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ἴδιος
Greek:
ἰδίαν
Transliteration:
idian
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
one's own/private
Morphhology:
Adjective Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a female person or thing that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἴδιος
Transliteration:
idios
Gloss:
one's own/private
Morphhology:
Greek Adjective
Definition:
ἴδιος, -α, -ον (in Attic usually -ος, -ον), [in LXX chiefly for of person(s) suff, also for לָהֶם, etc; (τὰ ἴ.) בֵּיתוֹ;] 1) one's own; (a) of that which is private and personal (in cl. opposite to κοινός, δημόσιος; cf. infr. 3); (b) of property, friends, home, country, etc. (in cl. opposite to ἀλλότριος; in late writers often, like ἑαυτοῦ, with weakened sense, see M, Pr., 87ff; Deiss, BS, 123f.): Luk.6:41, Jhn.1:42 5:43, Act.2:6 20:28, 1Co.11:21, Gal.6:5, 2Ti.1:9, Heb.7:27, Ju 6, al; πράσσειν τὰ ἴ, 1Th.4:11; κατὰ τὰς ἰ. ἐπιθυμίας, 2Ti.4:3; οἱ ἴδιοι, Jhn.1:11 (M, Pr., 90f; Field, Notes, 84) 13:1, Act.4:23, 1Ti.5:8; τὰ ἴδια, one's home (Field, Notes, l.with), Luk.18:28, Jhn.1:11 16:32 19:27. 2) peculiar, distinct, appropriate, proper: τὸ ἴ. σῶμα, 1Co.15:38; ἐν τ. ἰ. τάγματι, 1Co.15:23; εἰς τ. τόπον τ. ἴ, Act.1:25; = αὐτοῦ (see Deiss, ut. supr.), Mat.22:5, Jhn.1:42 (cf. Wis.10:1). 3) Adverbially (see supr, 1 (a); and cf. WM, 739:2); (a) ἰδίᾳ, severally, separately: 1Co.12:11; (b) κατ᾽ ἰδίαν, apart, privately, in private: Mat.14:13, 23 20:17, Mrk.4:34 7:33, Luk.10:23, Act.23:19, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἴδιος
Transliteration:
idios
Gloss:
one's own/private
Morphhology:
Greek Adjective
Definition:
ἴδιος [ῐδ], α, ον, Attic dialect also ος, ον [Refs 5th c.BC+]: I) one's own, pertaining to oneself: hence, I.1) private, personal (opposed to κοινός): twice in [Refs 8th c.BC+] this business is private, not public, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἴδιος ἐν κοινῷ σταλείς embarking as a private man in a public cause, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἰ. στόλῳ χρᾶσθαι, opposed to δημοσίῳ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἴδια πράσσων ἢ στρατοῦ ταχθεὶς ὕπ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ξυμβόλαια[Refs], etc; τὰ ἱρά, opposed to τὰ ἴ, temples, opposed to private buildings, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ἐν ἰδίοις discussion among private persons, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) one's own, opposed to ἀλλότριος, ἐπικώμια [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὔτοι τὰ χρήματ᾽ ἴ. κέκτηνται βροτοί [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φίλων οὐδὲν ἴ, ={κοινὰ τὰ τῶν φίλων}, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I.3) τὰ ἴ. private interests, opposed to public, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; one's own property, [Refs]; τὰ ἴ. πράττειν mind one's own business, in later Gr, [NT+2nd c.AD+]; μένειν ἐπὶ τῶν ἰ. [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; εἰς τὸ ἴ. καταθέσθαι for self, [Refs 5th c.BC+] my personal opinion, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἐμὰ ἴ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὰ αὑτοῦ ἴ. [Refs 6th c.BC+]; τὰ ὑμέτερα ἴ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὰ ἴ. σφῶν αὐτῶν, τὰ ἴ. τὰ σφέτερα αὐτῶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔγωγε τοὐμὸν ἴ. I for my own part, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] I.4) of persons, personally attached to one, ἴδιοι Σελεύκου [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἄνθρωπος ἴδιος τῇ εὐνοίᾳ τῇ πρὸς. [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ταῖς εὐνοίαις ἴδιοι [Refs 1st c.BC+]; ἴδιοι, οἱ, members of one's family, relatives, [Refs 1st c.AD+] I.5) ἡ ἰ. (sometimes with κώμη added, [Refs 2nd c.AD+], one's place of origin, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] I.6) in later Gr, almost as a possessive pronoun,= ἑαυτοῦ, ἑαυτῶν, ἡ ἰ. φιλαγαθία [Refs 2nd c.BC+], etc; χρῶνται ὡς ἰδίοις [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; περὶ τῶν ἰ. βιβλίων, title of work by Galen. I.6.b) ἴ. θάνατος one's own, i.e. a natural death, Ramsay Cities and Bishoprics[Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) separate, distinct, ἔθνος ἴ. καὶ οὐδαμῶς Σκυθικόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἴδιοί τινές σοι [θεοί]; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πόλεις. βαρβάρους καὶ ἰδίας Decrees cited in [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ βάτραχος ἰδίαν ἔχει τὴν γλῶτταν, τὴν ἰ. ἀφίησι φωνήν, a peculiar kind of tongue. its peculiar note, [Refs 4th c.BC+] unique and different from others, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.b) ἴ. λόγος, in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, private account, δεδώκαμεν Πύρωνι τὸν ἔσχατόν σου ἴ. λόγον [Refs 3rd c.BC+], etc; later, special account, a branch of the fiscal administration, Wilcken [Refs 2nd c.BC+], etc; ὁ γνώμων τοῦ ἰ. λόγου [Refs 1st c.AD+]; also as the title of the Controller, [Refs 1st c.BC+] II.2) strange, unusual, ἰδίοισιν ὑμεναίοισι κοὐχὶ σώφροσιν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; peculiar, exceptional, περιττὸν καὶ ἴ. γένος [Refs 4th c.BC+]; παράδοξον εἰπεῖν τι καὶ περιττὸν καὶ ἴ. [Refs 1st c.AD+]; eccentric, of persons, [Refs]; ἴ. τις ἐν πᾶσι βουλόμενος εἶναι [Refs] II.3) peculiar, appropriate, ἴδια ὀνόματα proper, specific words, opposed to περιέχοντα, class-names, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) ἴ. λόγοι ordinary private conversation, opposed to ποίησις, [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) τὸ ἴ. characteristic property of a species, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but also, distinguishing feature in a relative sense, ἴ. πρός τι [Refs 4th c.BC+] V) regular comparative ἰδιώτερος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: superlative -ώτατος[Refs 4th c.BC+]; also ἰδιαίτερος, -αίτατος, [Refs 4th c.BC+] VI) adverb ἰδίως, peculiarly, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; severally, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: comparative ἰδιωτέρως [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἰδίως καλεῖσθαι to be called specifically, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἰδίως, opposed to κοινῶς, λέγεσθαι [Refs 2nd c.BC+] F. (but in Grammars, to be used as a proper name, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; in a peculiar sense or usage, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also,= extra versum, τὸ φεῦ ἰδίως [Refs 5th c.BC+] VI.2) ἰδίᾳ, Ionic dialect -ιη, as adverb, by oneself, privately, on one's own account, θύοντι ἰδίῃ μούνῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+] apart from. , [Refs 5th c.BC+] VI.2.b) in ordinary talk, opposed to ὑπὸ ποιητῶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] VI.3) κατ᾽ ἰδίαν in private, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; κατ᾽ ἰ. λαβεῖν τινα to take him aside, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; also, separately, apart, [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; with spiritus asper, ἐκ τοῦ ηιδίου [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καθ᾽ ἱδίαν [Refs 6th c.AD+]; καθ᾽ ἱδδίαν probably in [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ἴδιος
Transliteration:
ídios
Pronounciation:
id'-ee-os
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
pertaining to self, i.e. one's own; by implication, private or separate; X his acquaintance, when they were alone, apart, aside, due, his (own, proper, several), home, (her, our, thine, your) own (business), private(-ly), proper, severally, their (own); of uncertain affinity

righteousness
Strongs:
Lexicon:
δικαιοσύνη
Greek:
δικαιοσύνην
Transliteration:
dikaiosunēn
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Gloss:
righteousness
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
δικαιοσύνη, -ης, ἡ (δίκαιος), [in LXX chiefly for צֶדֶק, and cognates, Gen.15:6, al, rarely for חֶסֶד, Gen.19:19;] the character of ὁ δίκαιος (which see) 1) in broad sense, righteousness, conformity to the Divine will in purpose, thought and action: Mat.5:6, Jhn.16:8, Act.13:10, Rom.4:3; λόγος δικαιοσύνης, teaching of r, Heb.5:13; βασιλεὺς δ. (cf. FlJ, BJ, vi, 10, β. δίκαιος), Heb.7:2; ὅπλα δ, Rom.6:13; ὁδὸς δ, Mat.21:32; θώραξ τῆς δ, Eph.6:14; διὰκονοι δ, 2Co.11:15; ὁσιότης καὶ δ, Luk.1:75, cf. Eph.4:24; ἀγαθωσύνῃ καὶ δ, Eph.5:9; δ. κ. εἰρήνη κ. χαρά, Rom.14:17; δ. κ. ἁγιασμός, 1Co.1:30; opposite to ἁμαρτία, Rom.8:10; ἀνομία, 2Co.6:14; άδικία, Rom.3:5; ποιεῖν τὴν δ, 1Jn.2:29 Jn 3:7; id. as an inclusive term for the active duties of the religious life (ICC, in l; Abbott, Essays, 73 ff), Mat.6:1; ἐργάζεσθαι δ, Act.10:35; διώκειν δ, 1Ti.6:11; πληροῦν πᾶσαν δ, Mat.3:15; ζῆν τῇ δ, 1Pe.2:24; δ. θεοῦ, a righteousness divine in its character and origin, Mat.6:33, Jas.1:20, (where it also includes the idea of God's personal r; see ICC, on Rom.1:17) Rom.1:17 3:5, 21-26 10:3, 2Co.5:21, Php.3:9; ἡ δ. τ. πίσιεως, Rom.4:11; ἡ ἐκ π. δ, Rom.9:30; ἡ κατὰ π. δ, Heb.11:7; opposite to this is ἡ ἐκ νόμου δ, Rom.10:5; ἡ δ. ἐν ν, Php.3:6; ἡ ἰδία δ, Rom.10:3, cf. Php.3:9 2) In narrower sense (cf. δίκαιος), justice: Act.17:31, 2Pe.1:1, Rev.19:11 (DCG, ii, 529 ff; Cremer, 190, 690). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Gloss:
righteousness
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
δῐκαι-οσύνη, ἡ, righteousness, justice, [LXX+6th c.BC+]; δ. δικαστική legal justice, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; opposed to ἐπιείκεια, [Refs] 2) fulfilment of the Law, [LXX+NT] II) justice, the business of a judge, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) Δ, personified, [Refs] IV) [Refs 4th c.BC+] name for four, [Refs] V) δικαιοσύνη· ἡ χοῖνιξ, μυστικῶς, [Refs 5th c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosýnē
Pronounciation:
dik-ah-yos-oo'-nay
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
equity (of character or act); specially (Christian) justification; righteousness; from g1342 (δίκαιος)

seeking
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ζητέω
Greek:
ζητοῦντες
Transliteration:
zētountes
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to seek
Morphhology:
Verb Present Active Participle Nominative Plural Masculine
Grammar:
an ACTION that is happening - done by male people or things that are doing something
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Additional:
seeking
Tyndale
Word:
ζητέω
Transliteration:
zēteō
Gloss:
to seek
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ζητέω, -ῶ, [in LXX chiefly for בּקשׁ pi, also for דּרשׁ, etc;] 1) to seek, seek for: Mat.7:7, 8 Luk.11:9, 10; with accusative of person(s), Mrk.1:37, Luk.2:48, Jhn.6:24, al; id. before ἐν, Act.9:11; with accusative of thing(s), Mat.13:45, Luk.19:10; before ἐν, Luk.13:6, 7; ψυχήν, of plotting against one's life (Exo.4:19, al.), Mat.2:20, Rom.11:3 " (LXX). Metaphorical, to seek by thinking, search after, inquire into: Mrk.11:18, Luk.12:28, Jhn.16:19; τ. θεόν, Act.17:27. 2) to seek or strive after, desire: Mat.12:46, Mrk.12:12, Luk.9:9, Jhn.5:18, Rom.10:3, al; τ. θάνατον, Rev.9:6; τ. βασιλείαν τ. θεοῦ, Mat.6:33 (Dalman, Words, 121f.); τὰ ἄνω, Col.3:1; εἰρήνην, 1Pe.3:11 (LXX). 3) to require, demand: with accusative of thing(s), Mrk.8:12, Luk.11:29, 1Co.1:22, 2Co.13:3; before παρά, Mrk.8:11, al; ἵνα, 1Co.4:2 (cf. ἀνα, ἐκ, ἐπι, συν-ζητέω). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ζητέω
Transliteration:
zēteō
Gloss:
to seek
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ζητ-έω, Doric dialect participle ζάτεισα [Refs 3rd c.BC+]imperfect ἐζήτουν, Epic dialect 3rd.pers. singular ζήτει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: aorist 1 ἐζήτησα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: perfect ἐζήτηκα [Refs 4th c.BC+] —middle, aorist 1 ἐζητησάμην (ἀν-) [Refs 3rd c.AD+]:—passive, future ζητηθήσομαι [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; but ζητήσομαι in passive sense,[Refs 2nd c.AD+]:—seek, seek for, ἐμὲ δ᾽ ἔξοχα πάντων ζήτει Il.[same place]; ζ. πημάτων ἀπαλλαγάς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὴ ζητῶν without seeking, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ζητούμενον ἁλωτόν what is sought for may be found, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) mquire for, τὰ πινάκια καὶ τὰ γραμματεῖα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) search after, search out, τὸν αὐτόχειρα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of huntsmen, ζ. τὸν λαγώ [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4) search or inquire into, investigate, examine, of philosophical investigation, ζ. τὰ θεῖα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ζητούμενον the matter of inquiry, the question, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; also of judicial inquiry, ζ. περὶ ἀδικημάτων [Refs 4th c.BC+]: generally, ζ. πότερον. ἤ [Refs 5th c.BC+] 5) require, demand, τῶν πράξεων παρὰ τοῦ στρατηγοῦ τὸν λόγον ζητοῦντες [Refs 4th c.BC+]. requires the opening up of the wound, [Refs 1st c.AD+] II) seek after, desire, ἀμήχανα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of natural tendencies, ὁ θερμὸς ὕφαμμον χώραν ζητεῖ [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—passive, ζητούμενος sought after, in great demand, [Refs] II.2) with infinitive, seek to do, ἐκμαθεῖν τι ζ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with future infinitive, ζητεῖς ἀναπείσειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with accusative et infinitive, seek or desire that, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) have to seek, feel the want of, ἵνα μὴ ζητέοιεν σιτία [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, ζητούμενος οἷς ἀπέλειπες [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ζητέω
Transliteration:
zētéō
Pronounciation:
dzay-teh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to seek (literally or figuratively); specially, (by Hebraism) to worship (God), or (in a bad sense) to plot (against life); be (go) about, desire, endeavour, enquire (for), require, (X will) seek (after, for, means); of uncertain affinity

to establish
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ἵστημι
Greek:
στῆσαι
Transliteration:
stēsai
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to stand
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Infinitive
Grammar:
an ACTION that was to happen
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἵστημι
Transliteration:
histēmi
Gloss:
to stand
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἵστημι, and in late writers, also ἱστάνω (Veitch, see word; Bl, §23, 2; M, Pr., 55), [in LXX chiefly for עמד, קוּם, also for נצב ni, hi, יצב hith, etc.]. I. Trans, in pres, impf, fut. and 1 aor. act. and in the tenses of the pass. 1) to make to stand, to place, set, set up, establish, appoint: with accusative of person(s), Mrk.7:9, Act.1:23 6:13 17:31, Heb.10:9; id. before ἐπί, with accusative loc, Mat.4:5, Luk.4:9; ἐν μέσῳ, Mat.18:2, Mrk.9:36, Jhn.8:[3]; ἐνώπιον, Act.6:6; παρ᾽ ἑαυτῷ, Luk.9:47; ἐκ δεξιῶν, Mat.25:33; mid, to place oneself, to stand: Rev.18:15; so also pass, to be made to stand, to stand: Mat.2:9, Luk.11:18 19:8, 2Co.13:1, al. 2) to set in a balance, to weigh (cl; LXX for שׁקל, Isa.46:6, al.): Mat.26:15, II. Intrans, in pf, plpf. (with sense of present and impf; M, Pr., 147f.) and 2 aor. act, to stand, stand by, stand still: Mat.20:32 26:73, Mrk.10:49, Luk.8:44, Jhn.1:35 3:29, Act.16:9, al; before ἐν, Mat.6:5, al; ἐνώπιον, Act.10:30, al; πρός, with dative loc, Jhn.18:16; ἐπί, with genitive loc, Luk.6:17, Act.5:23 25:10, al; ἔμπροσθεν, Mat.27:11; κύκλῳ, Rev.7:11; ἐκ δεξιῶν, Luk.1:11; ἐπί, with accusative, Mat.13:2, Rev.3:20; παρά, Luk.5:2; ἐκεῖ, Mrk.11:5; ὧδε, Mrk.9:1; ὅπου, Mrk.13:14; ἔξω, Mat.12:46; μακρόθεν, Luk.18:13; πόρρωθεν, Luk.17:12. Metaphorical, to stand ready, stand firm, be steadfast: 1Co.7:37 10:12, Eph.6:11, 13 14, Col.4:12; τ. πίστει, Rom.11:20; ἐν τ. ἀληθείᾳ, Jhn.8:44; εν τ. χάριτι, Rom.5:2; ἐν τ. εὐαγγελίῳ, 1Co.15:1 (cf. ἀν, ἐπ-ἀν, ἐξ-ἀν, ἀνθ, ἀφ, δι, ἐν, ἐξ, ἐπ- (-μαι), ἐφ, κατ-ἐφ, συν-ἐφ, καθ, ἀντι-καθ, ἀπο-καθ, μεθ, παρ, περι, προ, συν-ίστημι). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἵστημι
Transliteration:
histēmi
Gloss:
to stand
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ἵστημι (compare ἱστάω, ἱστάνω), I) causal, make to stand, imperative ἵστη [Refs 8th c.BC+]imperfect ἵστην, Epic dialect ἵστασκε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. plural ἵσταν [Refs 5th c.BC+]future στήσω, Doric dialect στᾱσῶ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]: aorist 1 ἔστησα, Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural ἔστᾰσαν for ἔστησαν uncertain in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: aorist 1 middle ἐστησάμην (never intransitive)[Refs 4th c.BC+]: perfect ἕστᾰκα [LXX+5th c.BC+]; also ἕστηκα (see. below) in transitive sense, (δι-) [LXX+4th c.BC+] [same place]; ἑστακεῖα transitive in [Refs] II) intransitive, stand, II.1) active, aorist 2 ἔστην, Epic dialect στάσκον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. plural ἔστησαν, more frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; imperative στῆθι, Doric dialect στᾶθι [Refs 7th c.BC+]subjunctive στῶ, Epic dialect [Refs 8th c.BC+]; 1st pers. plural στέωμεν (as disyllable)[Refs]; optative σταῖεν, Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural σταίησαν [Refs]; infinitive στῆναι, Epic dialect στήμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+], Doric dialect στᾶμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle στάς: perfect ἕστηκα: pluperfect ἑστήκειν, sometimes with strengthened augment εἱστήκειν, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect 3rd.pers. singular ἑστήκεε [Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect are preferred, ἕστᾰτον, ἕστᾰμεν, ἕστᾰτε, ἑστᾶσι [Refs 6th c.BC+]; imperative ἕστᾰθι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; subjunctive ἑστ; optative ἑσταίη; infinitive ἑστάναι, Epic dialect ἑστάμεν, ἑστάμεναι (ἑστηκέναι only late, as [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; participle ἑστώς (ἑστηκώς rare in early Gr, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but συνεστηκυιῶν probably in [Refs 5th c.BC+] frequently variant as in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; genitive ἑστῶτο; Ionic dialect ἑστεώς, ἑστεός, ῶτο; Epic dialect ἑστηώς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; dative plural ἑστηῶσι conjecture in [Refs 8th c.BC+]pluperfect ἑστάτην, ἕστᾰμεν, ἕστᾰτε, ἕστᾰσαν: late present ἑστήκω, formed from perfect, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]: hence, future ἑστήξω [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) passive, ἵσταμαι: imperative ἵστασο [Refs 8th c.BC+]imperfect ἱστάμην: future στᾰθήσομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: aorist ἐστάθην [Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely ἔστην, Doric dialect 3rd.pers. singular ἔσστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]perfect ἕσταμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] sthā-, cf. Sanskrit sthā- (aorist á-sthā-t), Latin stare, etc; Gr. reduplicate present and perfect from si-sthā, se-sthā.) A) Causal, make to stand, set up, πελέκεας ἑξείης [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἔγχος μέν ῥ᾽ ἔστησε φέρων πρὸς κίονα he set it against the pillar,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἱ. ἱστόν set up the loom, or raise the mast (see. ἱστός [Refs]; κρητῆρας στήσασθαι to have bowls set up, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θεοῖς. κρητῆρα στήσασθαι in honour of the gods, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; στῆσαί τινα ὀρθόν, στ. ὀρθὰν καρδίαν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; στῆσαι λόγχας, for battle, [Refs]; especially raise buildings, statues, trophies, etc, ἱ. ἀνδριάντα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἱ. τινὰ χαλκοῦν set him up in brass, raise a brazen statue to him, [Refs 4th c.BC+] (so in perfect, stand, οὗτος ἕστηκε λίθινος [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, σφυρήλατος ἐν Ὀλυμπία στάθητι [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II) set, place, of things or persons, τρίποδ᾽ ἔστασαν ἐν πυρί [Refs 8th c.BC+]; fix, τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς εἰς τὴν γῆν [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; especially set men in order or array, πεζοὺς δ᾽ ἐξόπιθε στῆσεν [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) bring to a standstill, stay, check, λαὸν δὲ στῆσον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; νέας, ἵππους, ἡμιόνους στῆσαι, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μύλην στῆσαι to stop the mill, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; στῆσε δ᾽ ἐν Ἀμνισῷ (i.e. νῆα)[Refs 4th c.AD+]; στῆσαι τὴν φάλαγγα halt it, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; στ. τὰ ὄμματα fix them, of a dying man, [Refs]; στ. τὸ πρόσωπον compose the countenance, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς κοιλίας Philotim. cited in [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—middle, ἱστάμενος τῷ νοσήματι [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) set on foot, stir up, κονίης. ἱστᾶσιν ὀμίχλην [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of battle, etc, φυλόπιδα στήσειν stir up strife, [Refs 8th c.BC+] the fray is on foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —also in middle, στησάμενοι δ᾽ ἐμάχοντο[Refs 8th c.BC+] arises, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also of passions and states of mind, μῆνιν, ἐλπίδα στῆσαι, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.3) set up, appoint, τινὰ βασιλέα [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle, ἐστάσαντο τύραννον [Refs 7th c.BC+]:—passive, ὁ ὑπὸ Δαρείου σταθεὶς ὕπαρχος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.4) establish, institute, χορούς, παννυχίδα, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; στῆσαι χορόν, Ὀλυμπιάδα, ἑορτάν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὑγιῶς ἱστάμενος λόγον setting up a bad argument, [Refs 1st c.AD+]:—passive, ἀγορὴ ἵσταταί τινι [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.5) = Latin statuere, determine, γνῶναι καὶ στῆσαι [Refs 1st c.BC+]:—passive, τὰ ὑπό τινος σταθέντα [Refs 1st c.AD+]; τὰ ἑσταμένα Wilcken [Refs 2nd c.BC+] A.III.6) fix by agreement, ὁ σταθεὶς τόκος [Refs 1st c.BC+]; τὸ ἑσταμένον ἐνοίκιον [Refs 3rd c.AD+] A.III.7) bring about, cause, ἀμπνοάν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; στῆσαι δύσκηλον χθόνα make its case desperate, [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.IV) place in the balance, weigh, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; [ἐκπώματα] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἱστάναι τι πρὸς ἀργύριον weigh a thing against silver, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀγαθὸς ἱστάναι good at weighing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ἐγγὺς καὶ τὸ πόρρω στήσας ἐν τῷ ζυγῷ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ τὸ ἱστάναι ἐλθεῖν have recourse to the scales, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, ἵστασθαι ἐπὶ ζυγοῦ [Refs 2nd c.AD+]weighed, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.IV.2) weigh out, pay, [LXX+NT] B) passive and intransitive tenses of active, to be set or placed, stand, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀντίοι ἔσταν, ἐναντίοι ἔστησαν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: proverbial of critical circumstances, ἐπὶ ξυροῦ ἵσταται ἀκμῆς [Refs 8th c.BC+], to be in a certain place or state, ἀργύρεοι σταθμοὶ ἐν χαλκέῳ ἕστασαν οὐδῷ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἑστάτω for ἔστω, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ νῦν ἑστῶτα,= τὰ νῦν, [Refs] adverb, ξυμφορᾶς ἵν᾽ ἕσταμεν, ἵν᾽ ἕστ. χρείας, in what case or need we are, [Refs]; ποῦ τύχης ἕστηκε; [Refs]; later also ἀδίκως, ὀρθῶς, εὐλαβῶς ἵστασθαι, behave wrongly, etc, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] B.2) take up an intellectual attitude, ὡς ἵστασθαι δεῖ περὶ χρημάτων κτήσεως [Refs 1st c.BC+]; οὐκ ὀρθῶς ἵ. [Refs] B.3) in pregnant sense, στῆναι ἐς. [Refs 8th c.BC+] those who did not face the danger, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) stand still, halt, ἀλλ᾽ ἄγε δὴ στέωμεν [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc; stand idle, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἑστάναι to be stationary, opposed to κινεῖσθαι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐ μὴν ἐνταῦθ᾽ ἕστηκε τὸ πρᾶγμα does not rest here, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἐὰν ἡ κοιλία στῇ if the bowels are constipated, [Refs 4th c.BC+]: with participle, οὐ στήσεται ἀδικῶν [Refs 4th c.BC+]; come to a stop, rest satisfied, ἄν τις ὀρθῶς ἐπιβάλῃ, ἔπειτα σταθῇ [Refs 4th c.BC+] there is a stop, one comes to a stop, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.2) metaphorically, stand firm, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of arguments or propositions, hold good, [Refs 5th c.BC+]participle, ἑστηκώς fixed, stable, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; λογισμὸς ἑστὼς καὶ νουνεχής [Refs 2nd c.BC+] adverb ἑστηκότως, opposed to στοχαστικῶς[Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ἑστηκότα θεωρήματα, ἑστηκότες σκοποί, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; of age, ἑστηκυῖα ἡλικία [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τιμαὶ ἑστηκυῖαι fixed prices, PTeb.unpublished[Refs] B.III) to be set up or upright, stand up, rise up, κρημνοὶ ἕστασαν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of a horse, ἵστασθαι ὀρθός to rear, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἵστασθαι βάθρων from the steps, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.2) to be set up, erected, or built, στήλη, ἥ τ᾽ ἐπὶ τύμβῳ ἑστήκῃ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; see above [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.III.3) generally, arise, begin, ἵστατο νεῖκος [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.4) in marking Time, ἔαρος νέον ἱσταμένοιο when spring is not long begun, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἕβδομος ἑστήκει μείς the seventh month was begun, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοῦ μὲν φθίνοντος μηνός, τοῦ δ᾽ ἱσταμένοιο as one month ends and the next begins, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; later μὴν ἱστάμενος, μεσῶν, φθίνων, first in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.5) to be appointed, στῆναι ἐς ἀρχήν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see above [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἵστημι
Transliteration:
hístēmi
Pronounciation:
stah'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to stand (transitively or intransitively), used in various applications (literally or figuratively); abide, appoint, bring, continue, covenant, establish, hold up, lay, present, set (up), stanch, stand (by, forth, still, up); a prolonged form of a primary (of the same meaning, and used for it in certain tenses)

to the
Strongs:
Lexicon:
Greek:
τῇ
Transliteration:
tēa
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Dative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a specific female person or thing that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

righteousness
Strongs:
Lexicon:
δικαιοσύνη
Greek:
δικαιοσύνῃ
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Context:
Next word
Morphhology:
Noun Dative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Gloss:
righteousness
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
δικαιοσύνη, -ης, ἡ (δίκαιος), [in LXX chiefly for צֶדֶק, and cognates, Gen.15:6, al, rarely for חֶסֶד, Gen.19:19;] the character of ὁ δίκαιος (which see) 1) in broad sense, righteousness, conformity to the Divine will in purpose, thought and action: Mat.5:6, Jhn.16:8, Act.13:10, Rom.4:3; λόγος δικαιοσύνης, teaching of r, Heb.5:13; βασιλεὺς δ. (cf. FlJ, BJ, vi, 10, β. δίκαιος), Heb.7:2; ὅπλα δ, Rom.6:13; ὁδὸς δ, Mat.21:32; θώραξ τῆς δ, Eph.6:14; διὰκονοι δ, 2Co.11:15; ὁσιότης καὶ δ, Luk.1:75, cf. Eph.4:24; ἀγαθωσύνῃ καὶ δ, Eph.5:9; δ. κ. εἰρήνη κ. χαρά, Rom.14:17; δ. κ. ἁγιασμός, 1Co.1:30; opposite to ἁμαρτία, Rom.8:10; ἀνομία, 2Co.6:14; άδικία, Rom.3:5; ποιεῖν τὴν δ, 1Jn.2:29 Jn 3:7; id. as an inclusive term for the active duties of the religious life (ICC, in l; Abbott, Essays, 73 ff), Mat.6:1; ἐργάζεσθαι δ, Act.10:35; διώκειν δ, 1Ti.6:11; πληροῦν πᾶσαν δ, Mat.3:15; ζῆν τῇ δ, 1Pe.2:24; δ. θεοῦ, a righteousness divine in its character and origin, Mat.6:33, Jas.1:20, (where it also includes the idea of God's personal r; see ICC, on Rom.1:17) Rom.1:17 3:5, 21-26 10:3, 2Co.5:21, Php.3:9; ἡ δ. τ. πίσιεως, Rom.4:11; ἡ ἐκ π. δ, Rom.9:30; ἡ κατὰ π. δ, Heb.11:7; opposite to this is ἡ ἐκ νόμου δ, Rom.10:5; ἡ δ. ἐν ν, Php.3:6; ἡ ἰδία δ, Rom.10:3, cf. Php.3:9 2) In narrower sense (cf. δίκαιος), justice: Act.17:31, 2Pe.1:1, Rev.19:11 (DCG, ii, 529 ff; Cremer, 190, 690). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosunē
Gloss:
righteousness
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Female
Definition:
δῐκαι-οσύνη, ἡ, righteousness, justice, [LXX+6th c.BC+]; δ. δικαστική legal justice, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; opposed to ἐπιείκεια, [Refs] 2) fulfilment of the Law, [LXX+NT] II) justice, the business of a judge, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) Δ, personified, [Refs] IV) [Refs 4th c.BC+] name for four, [Refs] V) δικαιοσύνη· ἡ χοῖνιξ, μυστικῶς, [Refs 5th c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
δικαιοσύνη
Transliteration:
dikaiosýnē
Pronounciation:
dik-ah-yos-oo'-nay
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
equity (of character or act); specially (Christian) justification; righteousness; from g1342 (δίκαιος)

<the>
Strongs:
Lexicon:
Greek:
τοῦ
Transliteration:
tou
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Definite article Genitive Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that something belongs to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As frequently in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and frequently in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article

of God
Strongs:
Lexicon:
θεός
Greek:
θεοῦ
Transliteration:
theou
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
God
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Singular Masculine Title
Grammar:
a proper name of a male PERSON OR THING that something belongs to
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
θεός
Transliteration:
theos
Gloss:
God
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male/Female
Definition:
θεός, -οῦ, ὁ, ἡ (Act.19:37 only; see M, Pr., 60, 244), late voc, θεέ (Mat.27:46; cf. Deu.3:24, al.), [in LXX chiefly for אֱלֹהִים, also for אֵל and other cognate forms, יהוה, etc;] a god or deity, God. 1) In polytheistic sense, a god or deity: Act.28:6, 1Co.8:4, 2Th.2:4, al; pl, Ac. 14:11 19:26, Gal.4:8, al. 2) Of the one true God; (a) anarthrous: Mat.6:24, Luk.20:38, al; esp. with prep. (Kühner 3, iii, 605), ἀπὸ θ, Jhn.3:2; ἐκ, Act.5:39, 2Co.5:1, Php.3:9; ὑπό, Rom.13:1; παρὰ θεοῦ, Jhn.1:6; παρὰ θεῷ, 2Th.1:6, 1Pe.2:4; κατὰ θεόν, Rom.8:27, 2Co.7:9, 10; also when in genitive dependent on an anarth. noun (Bl, §46, 6), Mat.27:43, Luk.3:2, Rom.1:17, 1Th.2:13; as pred, Lk 20:38, Jhn.1:1, and when the nature and character rather than the person of God is meant, Act.5:29, Gal.2:6, al. (M, Th., 14); (b) more freq, with art: Mat.1:23, Mrk.2:7, al. mult; with prep, ἀπὸ τ. θ, Luk.1:26; ἐκ, Jhn.8:42, al; παρὰ τοῦ θ, Jhn.8:40; π. τῷ θ, Rom.9:14; ἐν, Col.3:3; ἐπὶ τῷ θ, Luk.1:47; ἐπὶ τὸν θ, Act.15:19; εἰς τ. θ, Act.24:15; πρὸς τ. θ, Jhn.1:2; with genitive of person(s), Mat.22:32, Mrk.12:26, 27, Luk.20:37, Jhn.20:17, al; ὁ θ. μου, Rom.1:8, Php 1:3, al; ὁ θ. καὶ πατήρ κ. τ. λ, Rom.15:6, Eph.1:3, Phi 4:20, al; with genitive of thing(s), Rom.15:5, 13, 33, 2Co.1:3, 1Th.5:23; τὰ τ. θεοῦ, Mat.16:23, Mrk.12:17, 1Co.2:11; τὰ πρὸς τὸν θ, Rom.15:17, Heb.2:17 5:1; τ. θεῷ, as a superl. (LXX, Jos.3:3), Act.7:20, 2Co.10:4; Hebraistically, of judges (Psa.81(82):6), Jhn.10:34 " (LXX), 35. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
θεός
Transliteration:
theos
Gloss:
God
Morphhology:
Greek Noun Male/Female
Definition:
θεός, ὁ, Boeotian dialect θιός, Laconian dialect σιός (see. below), [Refs 5th c.AD+], Cretan dialect θιός [Refs], Doric dialect also θεύς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; vocative (only late) θεός, also θεέ [LXX+NT]; but classical in compound names, Ἀμφίθεε, Τιμόθεε:—God, the Deity, in general sense, both singular and plural (εἰ καὶ ἐπὶ θεοὺς καὶ ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐπὶ θεὸν ἁρμόζει μεταφέρειν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὺν θ. εἰρημένον [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so in plural, σύν γε θεοῖσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ θεῶν ἄτερ pi.[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὑπὲρ θεόν against his will,[Refs 4th c.BC+]; θεῶν συνεθελόντων, βουλομένων, [Refs 5th c.BC+]bless you! good heavens! for heaven's sake! [Refs 8th c.BC+]: doubled in poets, θεὸν θεόν τις ἀγλαϊζέτω [Refs 5th c.BC+]; θεοί (Cretan dialect θιοί) as an opening formula in Inscrr. (i.e. τύχην ἀγαθὴν διδοῖεν), [Refs].1, etc: in Prose also with the Article, ὁ θ. πάντων ἂν εἴη αἴτιος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ πρὸς τοὺς θ, τὰ παρὰ τῶν θ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] b) θεοί, opposed to ἄνδρες, πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in singular, θεῷ ἐναλίγκιος αὐδήν [Refs 8th c.BC+], of an 'angel's visit', [Refs 3rd c.BC+] c) of special divinities, νέρτεροι θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐνέρτεροι θ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἱ κάτωθεν θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ δώδεκα θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὰ τοὺς δώδεκα θ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in dual, τὼ σιώ (Laconian dialect), of Castor and Pollux, ναὶ τὼ σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] d) ὁ θ, of natural phenomena, ὁ θ. ὕει (i.e. Ζεύς) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔσεισεν ὁ θ. (i.e. Ποσειδῶν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of the sun, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δύνοντος τοῦ θ. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; the weather, τί δοκεῖ τὰ τοῦ θεο; [Refs 4th c.BC+] e) Astrology texts, θεοί,= ἀστέρες, [Refs 4th c.AD+] f) θεός (i.e. Ἥλιος), name of the 9th τόπος, Rhetor.[Refs] 2) metaphorically, of abstract things, τὸ δ᾽ εὐτυχεῖν τόδ᾽ ἐν βροτοῖς θεός τε καὶ θεοῦ πλέον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ πλοῦτος τοῖς σοφοῖς θ. [Refs]; φθόνος κάκιστος θ. [Refs] 3) as title of rulers, θεῶν ἀδελφῶν (i.e. Ptolemy Il and Arsinoe), [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ἀντίοχος ὅτῳ θεὸς ἐπώνυμον γίγνεται [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; θεὸς ἐκ θεοῦ, of Augustus, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 3.b) = Latin Divus, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; οἱ ἐν θεοῖς αὐτοκράτορες,= divi Imperatores, [Refs] 3.c) generally of the dead, καὶ ζῶντός σου καὶ εἰς θεοὺς ἀπελθόντος [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; θεοῖς χθονίοις,= Latin Dis Manibus, [Refs] 4) one set in authority, judge, τὸ κριτήριον τοῦ θ, ἐνώπιον τοῦ θ, [LXX] II) θεός feminine, goddess, μήτε θήλεια θεός, μήτε τις ἄρσην [Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially at Athens, of Athena, Decrees cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἁ Διὸς θεός, Ζηνὸς ἡ θ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of other goddesses, ποντία θεός [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ νερτέρα θ,= Περσεφόνη, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of Thetis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of Niobe, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in dual, of Demeter and Persephone, τὰ τοῖν θεοῖν ψηφίσματα [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) as adjective in comparative θεώτερος, divine, θύραι θ, opposed to καταιβαταὶ ἀνθρώποισιν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χορὸς θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (κόσμῳ θέντες τὰ πρήγματα), by [Refs 5th c.BC+] [In Epic dialect (twice in [Refs 8th c.BC+], as monosyllable by synizesis, θεοί [Refs 8th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
θεός
Transliteration:
theós
Pronounciation:
theh'-os
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very; X exceeding, God, god(-ly, -ward); of uncertain affinity; a deity, especially (with g3588 (ὁ)) the supreme Divinity

not
Strongs:
Lexicon:
οὐ
Greek:
οὐχ
Transliteration:
ouch
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Negative Particle Negative Negative
Grammar:
introducing a negative
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek Particle Neuter
Definition:
οὐ, before a vowel with smooth breathing οὐκ, before one with rough breathing οὐχ (but improperly οὐχ ἰδού, Act.2:7, WH, mg; cf. WH, Intr., §409; M, Pr., 44, 244), [in LXX for אֵין,אַיִן,לֹא;] neg. particle, not, no, used generally with indic, and for a denial of fact (cf. μή); 1) absol. (accented), οὔ, no: Mat.13:29 Jhn.1:21 21:5; οὒ οὕ, Mat.5:37 Jas.5:12. 2) Most frequently negativing a verb or other word, Mat.1:25 10:26, 38, Mrk.3:25 9:37, Jhn.8:29, Act.7:5, Rom.1:16, Php.3:3, al; in litotes, οὐκ ὀλίγοι (i.e. very many), Act.17:4, al; οὐκ ἄσημος, Act.21:39; πᾶς. οὐ, with verb, (like Heb. כֹּל. לֹא), no, none, Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, Luk.1:37, Eph.5:5, al; in disjunctive statements, οὐκ. ἀλλά, Luk.8:52 Jhn.1:33 Rom.8:2 o, al; with 2 of person(s) fut. (like Heb. לֹא, with impf.), as emphatic prohibition, Mat.4:7, Luk.4:12, Rom.7:7, al. 3) With another negative, (a) strengthening the negation: Mrk.5:37, Jhn.8:15 12:19, Act.8:39, al; (b) making an affirmative: Act.4:20, 1Co.12:15. 4) With other particles: οὐ μή (see: μή); οὐ μηκέτι, Mat.21:19; with μή interrog, Rom.10:18, 1Co.9:4, 5 11:22. 5) Interrogative, expecting an affirmative answer (Lat. nonne): Mat.6:26, Mrk.4:21, Luk.11:40, Jhn.4:35, Rom.9:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek Particle Neuter
Definition:
οὐ, the negative of fact and statement, as μή of will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. —The same differences hold for all compounds of οὐ and μή, and some examples of οὐδέ and οὐδείς are included below.—As to the Form, see infr. G. USAG[Refs 5th c.BC+] I) as the negative of single words, II) as the negative of the sentence. I) οὐ adhering to single words so as to form a quasi-compound with them:—with Verbs: οὐ δίδωμι withhold, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐκ εἰῶ prevent, [Refs]; οὐκ ἐθέλω refuse, [Refs]; οὔ φημι deny, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but sometimes οὐ is retained, εἰ δ᾽ ἂν. οὐκ ἐθέλωσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐάντε. οὐ (variant{μή}) φῆτε ἐάντε φῆτε [Refs 8th c.BC+] —On the use of οὐ in contrasts, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) as negativing the whole sentence, II.1) οὐ is frequently used alone, sometimes with the ellipsis of a definite Verb, οὔκ (i.e. ἀποκερῇ), ἄν γε ἐμοὶ πείθῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes as negativing the preceding sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] and the accusative; sometimes without μά, οὐ τὸν πάντων θεῶν θεὸν πρόμον Ἅλιον [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) with indicative of statement, τὴν δ᾽ ἐγὼ οὐ λύσω [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ φθίνει Κροίσου φιλόφρων ἀρετά [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.3) with subjunctive in future sense, only in Epic dialect, οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται [Refs] II.4) with optative in potential sense (without ἄν or κεν), also Epic dialect, ὃ οὐ δύο γ᾽ ἄνδρε φέροιεν [Refs] II.5) with optative and ἄν, κείνοισι δ᾽ ἂν οὔ τις. μαχέοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6) in dependent clauses οὐ is used, II.6.a) with ὅτι or ὡς, after Verbs of saying, knowing, and showing, ἐκ μέν τοι ἐρέω. ὡς ἐγὼ οὔ τι ἑκὼν κατερύκομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so with indicative or optative and ἄν, ἀπελογοῦντο ὡς οὐκ ἄν ποτε οὕτω μωροὶ ἦσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] in such sentences, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.b) in all causal sentences, and in temporal and Relat. sentences unless there is conditional or final meaning, χωσαμένη, ὅ οἱ οὔ τι θαλύσια. ῥέξε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in causal relative sentences, οἵτινές σε οὐχὶ ἐσώσαμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in the combinations, οὐκ ἔστιν ὅστις οὐ, as οὐκ ἔστ᾽ ἐραστὴς ὅστις οὐκ ἀεὶ φιλεῖ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδείς ἐστιν ὅστις οὐ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.c) after ὥστε with indicative or optative with ἄν, ὥστ᾽ οὐ δυνατόν σ᾽ εἵργειν ἔσται [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive is almost invariably due to indirect speech, ὥστ᾽ οὐκ αἰσχύνεσθαι (for οὐκ αἰσχύνονται) [Refs 5th c.BC+]—Rarely not in indirect speech, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7) in a conditional clause μή is necessary, except, II.7.a) in [Refs 8th c.BC+] clause precedes the apodosis and the verb is indicative, εἰ δέ μοι οὐκ ἐπέεσσ᾽ ἐπιπείσεται [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.7.b) when the εἰ clause is really causal, as after Verbs expressing surprise or emotion, μὴ θαυμάσῃς, εἰ πολλὰ τῶν εἰρημένων οὐ πρέπει σοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7.c) when οὐ belongs closely to the next word (see. [Refs 4th c.BC+], or is quoted unchanged, εἰ, ὡς νῦν φήσει, οὐ παρεσκευάσατο [Refs 4th c.BC+]; εἰ δ᾽ οὐκέτ᾽ ἐστί (i.e. ὥσπερ λέγεις), τίνι τρόπῳ διεφθάρη ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) οὐ is used with infinitive in indirect speech, when it represents the indicative of orat. recta, φαμὲν δέ οἱ οὐ τελέεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes we have οὐ and μή in consecutive clauses, οἶμαι σοῦ κάκιον οὐδὲν ἂν τούτων κρατύνειν μηδ᾽ ἐπιθύνειν χερί [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9) οὐ is used with the participle, when it can be resolved into a finite sentence with οὐ, as after Verbs of knowing and showing, τὸν κατθανόνθ᾽ ὁρῶντες οὐ τιμώμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a causal sentence, τῶν βαρβάρων οἱ πολλοὶ ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ διεφθάρησαν νέειν οὐκ ἐπιστάμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a concessive sentence, δόξω γυναῖκα καίπερ οὐκ ἔχων ἔχειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] and participle, ὡς οὐχὶ συνδράσουσα νουθετεῖς τάδε [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—for exceptions, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9.b) when the participle is used with the Article, μή is generally used, unless there is a distinct reference to a fact, when οὐ is occasionally found, ἡμεῖς δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς οὐκ οὔσης ἔτι [πόλεως] ὁρμώμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.10) Adjectives and abstract Substantives with the article commonly take μή (see. μή [Refs 5th c.BC+] is occasionally used, τὰς οὐκ ἀναγκαίας πόσεις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν τῶν γεφυρῶν οὐ διάλυσιν the non- dissolution of the bridges, the fact of their notbeing broken up, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so without the article, ἐν οὐ καιπῷ [Refs] II.11) for οὐ μή, see entry II.12) in questions οὐ ordinarily expects a positive answer, οὔ νυ καὶ ἄλλοι ἔασι.; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὁράᾳς.; dost thou not see? [NT+8th c.BC+]: the diphthong is genuine and always written ου (ουκ, ουδε, etc.) in early Inscrr, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; οὐ abbreviated ο, Suid. see at {Φιλοξένου γραμμάτιον}. H) ACCENTUATION. οὐ is oxytone accusative to Hdn.Gr.1.494 (text doubtfulin 504): [Refs 8th c.BC+] H.I) οὐ in connexion with other Particles will be found in alphabetical order, οὐ γάρ, οὐ μή, etc.—The corresponding forms of μή should be compared.
Strongs
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Pronounciation:
ookh
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the absolute negative (compare g3361 (μή)) adverb; no or not; + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but; a primary word

they submitted.
Strongs:
Lexicon:
ὑποτάσσω
Greek:
ὑπετάγησαν.
Transliteration:
hupetagēsan
Context:
Next word
Gloss:
to subject
Morphhology:
Verb 2nd Aorist Passive Indicative 3rd Plural
Grammar:
an ACTION that was done to people or things being discussed
Source:
Identical in all sources
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ὑποτάσσω
Transliteration:
hupotassō
Gloss:
to subject
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ὑπο-τάσσω [in LXX for דָבַר hi, דָּמַם, שׂוּם, שִׁית, etc;] 1) as a military term, to place or rank under (Polyb.). 2) to subject, put in subjection: 1Co.15:27, Php.3:21, Heb.2:5, 8; pass, Rom.8:20, 1Co.15:27-28, 1Pe.3:22, Eph.1:22. Mid, to subject oneself, obey: absol, Rom.13:5, 1Co.14:34; with dative of person(s), Luk.2:51 10:17, 20, Rom.8:7 10:3 13:1, 1Co.14:32 15:28 (ὑποταγήσεται; cf. M, Pr., 163), 1Co.16:16, Eph.5:21-22 (T, WH, txt, R, om.), Eph.5:24, Col.3:18, Tit.2:5, 9 3:1, Heb.12:9, 1Pe.2:18 3:1 3:5 5:5; imperat, Jas.4:7, 1Pe.2:13 5:5. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὑποτάσσω
Transliteration:
hupotassō
Gloss:
to subject
Morphhology:
Greek Verb
Definition:
ὑποτάσσω, Attic dialect ὑποτάττω, passive, future ὑποτᾰγήσομαι [Refs 1st c.AD+]aorist 2 ὑπετάγην [ᾰ] [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc:—place or arrange under, assign, τινί τι [Refs 2nd c.BC+] —passive, τὸ ὑποτεταγμένον (i.e. ὀστέον) the inferior bone, i. e. the ulna, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) post in the shelter of, ὑποτάσσεσθαι τινι [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; draw up behind, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II.2) subject, ἑαυτοὺς οὐδενί [Refs 5th c.BC+]; subdue, make subject, Θηβαΐδα [Refs 1st c.BC+]; ἔθνη [NT+2nd c.AD+]:—passive, to be obedient, τινι [NT+1st c.AD+]; ὑποτάξονται they will submit, [Refs 1st c.AD+]: absolutely, κοὐχ ὑποτᾰγεὶς ἐβάδιζεν ὥσπερ Νικίας dejectedly, timidly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (assuming variant); οἱ ὑποταττόμενοι subjects, [Refs 2nd c.BC+], etc; ὑποτεταγμένοι subordinates, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; ὑποτεταγμέναι ἀρεταί subordinate virtues, i. e. the sub-divisions of the four cardinal (πρῶται) virtues, [Refs] II.3) passive, with dative, underlie, to be implied in or associated with, τὰ -τεταγμένα τοῖς φθόγγοις [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὰ -τεταγμένα, ἡ -τεταγμένη διάνοια, of the content or meaning which underlies a writer's words, [Refs 1st c.BC+] III) put after, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; subjoin, append, ὑποτετάχαμέν σοι. τὸ ἀντίγραφον [Refs 2nd c.BC+] —passive, τὰ -τεταγμένα what follows, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; οἱ -τεταγμένοι [ἀριθμοί] the numbers that follow, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; οἱ ὑποτεταγμένοι the following persons, [Refs 3rd c.AD+]; κῶμαι αἱ ὑποτεταγμέναι the following villages, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] III.2) take as a minor premiss, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] IV) govern the subjunctive, [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ὑποτάσσω
Transliteration:
hypotássō
Pronounciation:
hoop-ot-as'-so
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to subordinate; reflexively, to obey; be under obedience (obedient), put under, subdue unto, (be, make) subject (to, unto), be (put) in subjection (to, under), submit self unto; from g5259 (ὑπό) and g5021 (τάσσω)

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