Lucas 7:46

46 Na ampiaste minrio jeró sat ampio; tami ocona sat ampio lacho ha ampiado minres pindrés.
With oil
Strongs:
Word:
ἐλαίῳ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Dative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a neuter PERSON OR THING that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
olive oil
Tyndale
Word:
ἔλαιον
Transliteration:
elaion
Gloss:
olive oil
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
ἔλαιον, -ου, τό [in LXX chiefly for שֶׁמֶן;] olive-oil: Luk.16:6, Rev.6:6 18:13; for lamps, Mat.25:3-4, 8; for healing, Mrk.6:13, Luk.10:34, Jhn.5:14; for anointing at feasts, Luk.7:46, Heb.1:9 " (LXX). SYN.: μύρον, ointment, see Tr, Syn., 135 (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἔλαιον
Transliteration:
elaion
Gloss:
olive oil
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
ἔλαιον, τό, (ἐλαία) olive-oil, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] mostly anointing-oil, used after the bath, λοεσσαμένω καὶ ἀλειψαμένω λίπ᾽ ἐλαίῳ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; before wrestling and other gymnastic exercises, πωλησεῦντι τὸ ἔ. εἰς τὸ γυμνάσιον [Refs]; ἔ. θεῖναι to provide oil at the baths, [Refs] (a); ἐλαίῳ πῦρ κατας βεννύναι [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; εὐῶδες ἔ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ῥοδόεν (rose-scented) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἔ. λευκον[Refs 4th c.BC+] II) any oily substance, ἔ. χήνειον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κίκινον, ἀμυγδάλινον ἔ, etc, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ἔ. ἀπὸ σελαχῶν, like our 'cod-liver oil', [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἔ. ἀπὸ γάλακτος butter, [Refs 4th c.BC+] III) at Athens, oil-market, ἀναμενῶ σε. πρὸς τοὔλαιον [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἔλαιον
Transliteration:
élaion
Pronounciation:
el'-ah-yon
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Neuter
Definition:
olive oil; oil; neuter of the same as g1636 (ἐλαία);

the
Strongs:
Word:
τὴν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC female person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»006:G2776
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

head
Strongs:
Word:
κεφαλήν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
κεφαλή
Transliteration:
kephalē
Gloss:
head
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
κεφαλή, -ῆς, ἡ [in LXX nearly always for רֹאשׁ;] the head: Mat.5:35, Mrk.6:24, Rev.1:14 9:7, al. mult; figuratively, ἄνθρακες ἐπὶ τὴν κ, Rom.12:20 (LXX); αἷμι, Act.18:6; metaph, of a husband, with genitive, 1Co.1:13, Eph.5:23; of Christ, 1Co.11:3, Eph.4:15 5:23, Col.1:18 2:10, 19; of things, κ. γωνίας, Mat.21:42 (LXX) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
κεφαλή
Transliteration:
kephalē
Gloss:
head
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
κεφᾰλή, ἡ, head of man or beast, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κεφαλῇ. μείζονες taller in stature, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so μείων. κεφαλήν[Refs 3rd c.BC+] a) κατὰ κεφαλῆς, Epic dialect κὰκ κεφαλῆς, down over the head, κόνιν. χεύατο κὰκ κεφαλῆς [Refs 8th c.BC+] b) κατὰ κεφαλήν, Epic dialect κὰκ κεφαλήν on the head, Ἐρύλαον. βάλε πέτρῳ μέσσην κὰκ κεφαλήν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in Prose, from above, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: c.genitive, above, κ. κ. τινῶν γενέσθαι [Refs]; τὸ κ. κ. ὕδωρ, of rain water, [Refs 4th c.BC+] (-ῆς): in Architecture texts, upright, [Refs]; also, per head, each person (compare below 1.2), [LXX+4th c.BC+] c) ἐς πόδας ἐκ κεφαλῆς from head to foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+] d) ἐπὶ κεφαλήν head foremost, ἐπὶ κ. κατορύξαι to bury head downwards, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ κ. ὠθέεσθαι to be thrust headlong, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐ βουλόμενος πολίτας ἄνδρας ἐπὶ κ. εἰσπράττειν τὸν μισθόν recklessly, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ ταῖς κεφαλαῖς περιφέρειν carry on high, in token of admiration, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) as the noblest part, periphrastic for the whole person, πολλὰς ἰφθίμους κ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἶσον ἐμῇ κ. no less than myself, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in bad sense, ὦ κακαὶ κεφαλαί [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in bad sense, ἡ μιαρὰ καὶ ἀναιδὴς αὕτη κ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; μεγάλη κ. a great personage, Vett. Val.[Refs] 3) life, ἐμῇ κ. περιδείδια [Refs 8th c.BC+]; παρθέμενοι κεφαλάς staking their heads on the cast, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὴν κ. ἀποβαλέεις [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4) in imprecations, ἐς κεφαλὴν τράποιτ᾽ ἐμοί on my head be it! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐς κ. σοί (i.e. τράποιτο) [NT+5th c.BC+] II) of things, extremity, II.a) in Botany, κ. σκορόδου head (= inflorescence) of garlic, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ῥίζα κ. ἔχουσα πλείονας tubers, [Refs 1st c.AD+] II.b) in Anatomy, κεφαλαὶ τῆς κάτω γνάθου, probably the condyloid and coronoid processes, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ κ. τοῦ ὄρχεως, ={ἐπιδιδυμίς}, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; μηροῦ, κνήμης κ, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of the base of the heart, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; but, apex, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of the sac in poulps, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; of muscles, origin, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II.c) generally, top, brim of a vessel, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; coping of a wall, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; capital of a column, [LXX+2nd c.AD+] II.d) in plural, source of a river, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (butsg, mouth, οἶδα Γέλα ποταμοῦ κεφαλῇ ἐπικείμενον ἄστυ [Refs]: generally, source, origin, Ζεὺς κ. (variant{ἀρχή}), Ζεὺς μέσσα, Διὸς δ᾽ ἒκ πάντα τελεῖται τέτυκται codices) [Refs 5th c.AD+]; starting-point, κ. χρόνου [Refs 6th c.AD+] II.e) extremity of a plot of land, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] III) Ὁμηρείη κ. bust of Homer, [Refs] IV) κ. περίθετος wig, head-dress, [Refs 5th c.BC+] V) metaphorically, κ. δείπνου pièce de résistance, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V.2) crown, completion, κεφαλὴν ἐπιθεῖναι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; consummation, σχεῖν κ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] V.3) sum, total, πάσας ἐρρηγείας [Refs]; of money, [Refs 4th c.BC+] V.4) band of men, [LXX]; right-hand half of a phalanx (opposed to οὐρά), [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V.5) Astron, κ. τοῦ κόσμου, of Aries, [Refs 4th c.AD+]. (ghebh, compare κεβλή and Engl. gable.)
Strongs
Word:
κεφαλή
Transliteration:
kephalḗ
Pronounciation:
kef-al-ay'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
the head (as the part most readily taken hold of), literally or figuratively; head; from the primary (in the sense of seizing);

of Me
Strongs:
Word:
μου
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun 1st Genitive Singular
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned person or thing that is speaking or writing that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
my
Conjoined:
«006:G2776
Tyndale
Word:
ἐγώ
Transliteration:
egō
Gloss:
I/we
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
ἐγώ, genitive, etc, ἐμοῦ, ἐμοί, ἐμέ (enclitic μου, μοι, με), pl. ἡμεῖς, -ῶν, -ῖν, -ᾶς, of person(s) pron. I. (a) The nom. is usually emphatic, when expressed as subjc, as in Mat.3:11, Mrk.1:8, Luk.3:16, al. But often there is no apparent emphasis, as Mat.10:16, Jhn.10:17; ἰδοὺ ἐ. (= Heb. הִנֵּנִי, cf. 1Ki.3:8), Act.9:10; ἐ. (like Heb. אֲנִי), I am, Jhn.1:23 (LXX), Act.7:32 (LXX). (b) The enclitic forms (see supr.) are used with nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, where there is no emphasis: ἐν τ. πατρί μου, Jhn.14:20; μου τ. λόγους, Mat.7:24; ὀπίσω μου, Mat.3:11; ἰσχυρότερός μου, ib; λέγει μοι, Rev.5:5; also with the prep. πρός, as Mrk.9:19, al. The full forms (ἐμοῦ, etc.) are used with the other prepositions, as δι᾽ ἐμοῦ, ἐν ἐμοί, εἰς ἐμέ, etc, also for emphasis, as Luk.10:16, Jhn.7:23, Mrk.14:7, al. (with) The genitive μου and ἡμῶν are often used for the poss. pronouns ἐμός, ἡμέτερος: τ. λαόν μου, Mat.2:6; μου τῂ ἀπιστιᾳ, Mrk.9:24. (d) τί ἐμοὶ καὶ σοί (= Heb. מַה־לִי וָלָךְ, Jdg.11:12, al.), i.e. what have we in common: Mat.8:29, Mrk.1:24, 5:7, Luk.8:28, Jhn.2:4; τί γάρ μοι, 1Co.5:2. (e) The interchange of ἐγώ and ἡμεῖς, common in π, appears in Pauline Epp. (see M, Pr., 86f, M, Th., 131f.). (f) κἀγώ (= καὶ ἐγώ), and I, even I, I also: Mat.2:8, Luk.2:48, Jhn.6:56, Rom.3:7, 1Co.7:40, al; κἀγώ. καί, both. and, Jhn.7:28. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἐγώ
Transliteration:
egō
Gloss:
I/we
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
ἐγώ, I: pronoun of the first person:—Epic dialect mostly ἐγών before vowels (so in Doric dialect, before consonants, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect ἱών [Refs 2nd c.AD+]:— strengthened ἔγωγε, I at least, for my part, indeed, for myself (more frequently in Attic dialect than in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: Doric dialect ἐγώνγα [Refs 7th c.BC+]: Boeotian dialect ἱώνγα [Refs 6th c.BC+]; ἱώνει [Refs]; ἰώγα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: Laconian dialect and Tarentum dialect ἐγώνη, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) oblique cases from a different root, genitive ἐμοῦ, enclitic μο; Ionic dialect and Epic dialect ἐμέο, ἐμεῦ, μευ, also ἐμέθεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἔμεθεν [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἐμέος, ἐμεῦς, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect ἐμοῦς [Refs 6th c.BC+] — _dative_ ἐμοί, enclitic μοι (which may be compared with Sanskrit genitive me in κλῦθί μοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἐμίν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Tarentum dialect ἐμίνη [Refs 3rd c.BC+], enclitic μ; [Refs 5th c.AD+] III) dual, nominative and accusative, νῶι, we two, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; accusative νῶιν Zenod.ad [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Attic dialect νώ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; νῶι dative, [Refs 5th c.AD+]; νῶιν, ={ἡμῖν}, [Refs 4th c.AD+] IV) plural, nominative ἡμεῖς (ἡμέες falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἄμμες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἁμές [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ἡμέων [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἀμμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἄμμων [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Doric dialect ἁμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἁμῶν [[Refs 5th c.BC+]; Cretan dialect, Boeotian dialect ἁμίων [Refs 5th c.BC+] (ῐ) (or ἧμιν Aristarch.ad [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also rarely in Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἄμμῐν, ἄμμῐ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect also ἁμίν or ἇμιν, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; with ῑ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ἡμέας [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἥμεας [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἄμμε [Refs 8th c.BC+], Theocr.8.25; Doric dialect ἁμέ [Refs 6th c.BC+]—On these dialectic varieties, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] ff. (Cf. Sanskrit ahám (ἐγών), accusative plural asmā´n; for νώ cf. Sanskrit nau):—frequently in answers, as an affirmative, especially in form ἔγωγε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὗτος ἐ. here am [Refs 5th c.BC+]; rarely with Article, τὸν ἐμέ myself, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the Self, the Ego, [Refs 5th c.AD+]; τίς ὢν οὗτος ὁ ἐγὼ τυγχάν; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τί τοῦτ᾽ ἐμο; ἡμῖν τί τοῦτ᾽ ἔστ; Latin quid mea hoc refert? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐγ; in a question, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡμεῖς the self, ἔνθα δὴ ἡμεῖς μάλιστα [Refs 3rd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
ἐγώ
Transliteration:
egṓ
Pronounciation:
eg-o'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
; I, me; a primary pronoun of the first person I (only expressed when emphatic)

not
Strongs:
Word:
οὐκ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Negative Particle Negative Negative
Grammar:
introducing a negative
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
no
Tyndale
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek, Negative
Definition:
οὐ, before a vowel with smooth breathing οὐκ, before one with rough breathing οὐχ (but improperly οὐχ ἰδού, Act.2:7, WH, mg; cf. WH, Intr., §409; M, Pr., 44, 244), [in LXX for אֵין,אַיִן,לֹא;] neg. particle, not, no, used generally with indic, and for a denial of fact (cf. μή); 1) absol. (accented), οὔ, no: Mat.13:29 Jhn.1:21 21:5; οὒ οὕ, Mat.5:37 Jas.5:12. 2) Most freq. negativing a verb or other word, Mat.1:25 10:26, 38, Mrk.3:25 9:37, Jhn.8:29, Act.7:5, Rom.1:16, Php.3:3, al; in litotes, οὐκ ὀλίγοι (i.e. very many), Act.17:4, al; οὐκ ἄσημος, Act.21:39; πᾶς. οὐ, with verb, (like Heb. כֹּל. לֹא), no, none, Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, Luk.1:37, Eph.5:5, al; in disjunctive statements, οὐκ. ἀλλά, Luk.8:52 Jhn.1:33 Rom.8:2 o, al; with 2 of person(s) fut. (like Heb. לֹא, with impf.), as emphatic prohibition, Mat.4:7, Luk.4:12, Rom.7:7, al. 3) With another negative, (a) strengthening the negation: Mrk.5:37, Jhn.8:15 12:19, Act.8:39, al; (b) making an affirmative: Act.4:20, 1Co.12:15. 4) With other particles: οὐ μή (see: μή); οὐ μηκέτι, Mat.21:19; with μή interrog, Rom.10:18, 1Co.9:4, 5 11:22. 5) Interrogative, expecting an affirmative answer (Lat. nonne): Mat.6:26, Mrk.4:21, Luk.11:40, Jhn.4:35, Rom.9:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek, Negative
Definition:
οὐ, the negative of fact and statement, as μή of will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. —The same differences hold for all compounds of οὐ and μή, and some examples of οὐδέ and οὐδείς are included below.—As to the Form, see infr. G. USAG[Refs 5th c.BC+] I) as the negative of single words, II) as the negative of the sentence. I) οὐ adhering to single words so as to form a quasi-compound with them:—with Verbs: οὐ δίδωμι withhold, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐκ εἰῶ prevent, [Refs]; οὐκ ἐθέλω refuse, [Refs]; οὔ φημι deny, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but sometimes οὐ is retained, εἰ δ᾽ ἂν. οὐκ ἐθέλωσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐάντε. οὐ (variant{μή}) φῆτε ἐάντε φῆτε [Refs 8th c.BC+] —On the use of οὐ in contrasts, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) as negativing the whole sentence, II.1) οὐ is frequently used alone, sometimes with the ellipsis of a definite Verb, οὔκ (i.e. ἀποκερῇ), ἄν γε ἐμοὶ πείθῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes as negativing the preceding sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] and the accusative; sometimes without μά, οὐ τὸν πάντων θεῶν θεὸν πρόμον Ἅλιον [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) with indicative of statement, τὴν δ᾽ ἐγὼ οὐ λύσω [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ φθίνει Κροίσου φιλόφρων ἀρετά [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.3) with subjunctive in future sense, only in Epic dialect, οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται [Refs] II.4) with optative in potential sense (without ἄν or κεν), also Epic dialect, ὃ οὐ δύο γ᾽ ἄνδρε φέροιεν [Refs] II.5) with optative and ἄν, κείνοισι δ᾽ ἂν οὔ τις. μαχέοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6) in dependent clauses οὐ is used, II.6.a) with ὅτι or ὡς, after Verbs of saying, knowing, and showing, ἐκ μέν τοι ἐρέω. ὡς ἐγὼ οὔ τι ἑκὼν κατερύκομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so with indicative or optative and ἄν, ἀπελογοῦντο ὡς οὐκ ἄν ποτε οὕτω μωροὶ ἦσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] in such sentences, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.b) in all causal sentences, and in temporal and Relat. sentences unless there is conditional or final meaning, χωσαμένη, ὅ οἱ οὔ τι θαλύσια. ῥέξε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in causal relative sentences, οἵτινές σε οὐχὶ ἐσώσαμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in the combinations, οὐκ ἔστιν ὅστις οὐ, as οὐκ ἔστ᾽ ἐραστὴς ὅστις οὐκ ἀεὶ φιλεῖ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδείς ἐστιν ὅστις οὐ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.c) after ὥστε with indicative or optative with ἄν, ὥστ᾽ οὐ δυνατόν σ᾽ εἵργειν ἔσται [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive is almost invariably due to indirect speech, ὥστ᾽ οὐκ αἰσχύνεσθαι (for οὐκ αἰσχύνονται) [Refs 5th c.BC+]—Rarely not in indirect speech, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7) in a conditional clause μή is necessary, except, II.7.a) in [Refs 8th c.BC+] clause precedes the apodosis and the verb is indicative, εἰ δέ μοι οὐκ ἐπέεσσ᾽ ἐπιπείσεται [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.7.b) when the εἰ clause is really causal, as after Verbs expressing surprise or emotion, μὴ θαυμάσῃς, εἰ πολλὰ τῶν εἰρημένων οὐ πρέπει σοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7.c) when οὐ belongs closely to the next word (see. [Refs 4th c.BC+], or is quoted unchanged, εἰ, ὡς νῦν φήσει, οὐ παρεσκευάσατο [Refs 4th c.BC+]; εἰ δ᾽ οὐκέτ᾽ ἐστί (i.e. ὥσπερ λέγεις), τίνι τρόπῳ διεφθάρη ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) οὐ is used with infinitive in indirect speech, when it represents the indicative of orat. recta, φαμὲν δέ οἱ οὐ τελέεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes we have οὐ and μή in consecutive clauses, οἶμαι σοῦ κάκιον οὐδὲν ἂν τούτων κρατύνειν μηδ᾽ ἐπιθύνειν χερί [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9) οὐ is used with the participle, when it can be resolved into a finite sentence with οὐ, as after Verbs of knowing and showing, τὸν κατθανόνθ᾽ ὁρῶντες οὐ τιμώμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a causal sentence, τῶν βαρβάρων οἱ πολλοὶ ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ διεφθάρησαν νέειν οὐκ ἐπιστάμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a concessive sentence, δόξω γυναῖκα καίπερ οὐκ ἔχων ἔχειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] and participle, ὡς οὐχὶ συνδράσουσα νουθετεῖς τάδε [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—for exceptions, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9.b) when the participle is used with the Article, μή is generally used, unless there is a distinct reference to a fact, when οὐ is occasionally found, ἡμεῖς δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς οὐκ οὔσης ἔτι [πόλεως] ὁρμώμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.10) Adjectives and abstract Substantives with the article commonly take μή (see. μή [Refs 5th c.BC+] is occasionally used, τὰς οὐκ ἀναγκαίας πόσεις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν τῶν γεφυρῶν οὐ διάλυσιν the non- dissolution of the bridges, the fact of their notbeing broken up, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so without the article, ἐν οὐ καιπῷ [Refs] II.11) for οὐ μή, see entry II.12) in questions οὐ ordinarily expects a positive answer, οὔ νυ καὶ ἄλλοι ἔασι.; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὁράᾳς.; dost thou not see? [NT+8th c.BC+]: the diphthong is genuine and always written ου (ουκ, ουδε, etc.) in early Inscrr, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; οὐ abbreviated ο, Suid. see at {Φιλοξένου γραμμάτιον}. H) ACCENTUATION. οὐ is oxytone accusative to Hdn.Gr.1.494 (text doubtfulin 504): [Refs 8th c.BC+] H.I) οὐ in connexion with other Particles will be found in alphabetical order, οὐ γάρ, οὐ μή, etc.—The corresponding forms of μή should be compared.
Strongs
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Pronounciation:
ookh
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the absolute negative (compare g3361 (μή)) adverb; no or not; + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but; a primary word;

you did anoint;
Strongs:
Word:
ἤλειψας
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Indicative 2nd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person being spoken or written to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to anoint
Tyndale
Word:
ἀλείφω
Transliteration:
aleiphō
Gloss:
to anoint
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἀλείφω (cf. λίπος, oil), [in LXX: Gen.31:13, Exo.40:15, Num.3:3 (מָשַׁח), Eze.13:10 ff. (טוּחַ), Rut.3:3, 2Ki.12:20 14:2, 4Ki.4:2, 2Ch.28:15, Mic.6:15, Dan LXX TH Dan.10:3 (סוּךְ), Est.2:12, Jdth.16:8 *;] to anoint, festally or in homage: with accusative of thing(s) or of person(s), Mat.6:17, Jhn.12:3, Mrk.16:1; before dative, ἐλαίῳ, Mrk.6:13, Jas.5:14; μύρῳ, Luk.7:38, 46, Jhn.11:2. SYN.: χρίω, μυρίζω (against the distinction made bet. ἀ. and χ. in Tr, Syn., § 38, see MM, VGT, see word, ἀ.) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἀλείφω
Transliteration:
aleiphō
Gloss:
to anoint
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἀλείφω, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: future -ψω[LXX], (ἐξ-) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist ἤλειψα[Refs 8th c.BC+], Attic dialect, Epic dialect ἄλειψα[Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect ἀλήλῐφα (ἀπ-) [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—middle, future -ψομαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist ἠλειψάμην Attic dialect, Epic dialect ἀλ-[Refs 8th c.BC+] —passive, future ἀλειφθήσομαι (ἐξ-) [Refs 4th c.BC+]: aorist 1 ἠλείφθην[Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist 2 ἐξ-ηλίφην variant in [Refs 5th c.BC+], (ἀπ-) [Refs 5th c.BC+], (ἐξ, ὑπ-) [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—anoint the skin with oil, as was done after bathing, active referring to another, middle to oneself, λοῦσαι κέλετ᾽ ἀμφί τ᾽ ἀλεῖψαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]: later of anointing for gymnastic exercises, λίπα μετὰ τοῦ γυμνάζεσθαι ἠλείψαντο[Refs 6th c.BC+]; of anointing the sick, [NT+4th c.BC+] 2) supply oil for gymnasts, ἀλειφούσης τῆς πόλεως [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ἀ. πανήγυριν, ἔθνη, [Refs]; οἱ -όμενοι youths undergoing gymnastic training, [Refs]; οἱ ἀ. ἐν τῷ γυμνασίῳ [Refs]; ἀλείφεσθαι παρά τινι to attend a gymnastic school, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 3) polish, τράπεζαν[Refs 4th c.BC+] 4) metaphorically, prepare as if for gymnastics, encourage, stimulate, instigate, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, τοὺς -ομένους ἐπί τι[Refs 5th c.BC+] II) daub, plaster, besmear, οὔατα ἀλεῖψαι stop up ears, [Refs 8th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἀλείφω
Transliteration:
aleíphō
Pronounciation:
al-i'-fo
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to oil (with perfume); anoint; from g1 (Α) (as particle of union) and the base of g3045 (λιπαρός);

she herself
Strongs:
Word:
αὕτη
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Demonstrative pronoun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a reference to SPECIFIC a female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
this
Conjoined:
»020:G218
Tyndale
Word:
οὗτος
Transliteration:
ohutos
Gloss:
this/he/she/it
Morphhology:
Greek, Demonstrative Pronoun
Definition:
οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο, genitive, τούτου, ταύτης, τούτου, [in LXX chiefly for זֹאת,זֶה;] demonstr. pron. (related to ἐκεῖνος as hic to ille), this; 1) as subst, this one, he; (a) absol: Mat.3:17, Mrk.9:7, Luk.7:44, 45, Jhn.1:15, Act.2:15, al; expressing contempt (cl.), Mat.13:55, 56, Mrk.6:2, 3, Jhn.6:42, al; εἰς τοῦτο, Mrk.1:38, Rom.14:9; μετὰ τοῦτο (ταῦτα; V. Westc. on Jhn.5:1), Jhn.2:12 11:7, al; (b) epanaleptic (referring to what precedes): Mat.5:19, Mrk.3:35, Luk.9:48, Jhn.6:46, Rom.7:10, al; (with) proleptic (referring to what follows): before ἵνα (Bl, §69, 6), Luk.1:43, Jhn.3:19 (and freq.) 15:8, Rom.14:9, al; before ὅτι, Luk.10:11, Jhn.9:3 o, Act.24:14, Rom.2:3, al; ὅπως, Rom.9:17; ἐάν, Jhn.13:35; (d) special idioms: τοῦτο μὲν. τ. δέ (cl), partly. partly. Heb.10:33; καὶ τοῦτο (τοῦτον, ταῦτα), and that (him) too, Rom.13:11, 1Co.2:2, Heb.11:12; τοῦτ᾽ ἐστιν, Mat.27:46. 2) As adj, with subst; (a) with art. (α) before the art: Mat.12:32, Mrk.9:29, Luk.7:44, Jhn.4:15, Rom.11:24, Rev.19:9, al; (β) after the noun: Mat.3:9, Mrk.12:16, Luk.11:31, Jhn.4:13, Act.6:13, Rom.15:28, 1Co.1:20, Rev.2:24, al; (b) with subst. anarth. (with predicative force; Bl, §49, 4): Luk.1:36 2:2 24:21, Jhn.2:11 4:54 21:14, 2Co.13:1. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οὗτος
Transliteration:
ohutos
Gloss:
this/he/she/it
Morphhology:
Greek, Demonstrative Pronoun
Definition:
οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο, genitive τούτου, ταύτης, τούτου, etc: the dual feminine never in Attic dialect, see ὁ, ἡ, τό, [near the start]:—demonstrative pronoun, this, common from [Refs 8th c.BC+] A) ORIGIN and FORMS: οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο probably arose from a reduplication of the demonstrative ὁ, ἡ, τό with insertion of -υ- (= Sanskrit Particle u), e.g. ταῦτα from τα-υ-τα: Doric dialect genitive singular feminine τούτας [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc, the latter is uncertain in [Refs 5th c.BC+], as genitive singular neuter οὕτω [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; accusative singular feminine οὕταν [Refs 6th c.BC+] —In _Attic dialect_ οὗτος was frequently strengthened by the _demonstrative_ -ί, οὑτοσί, αὑτηί, τουτί, _genitive_ τουτουί, _dative_ τουτῳί, _accusative_ τουτονί; plural nominative οὑτοιί, neuter ταυτί, etc, this man here: sometimes a Particle is inserted between the pronoun and -ί, as αὑτηγί for αὑτηί γε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τουτογί for τουτί γε, [Refs]; ταυταγί for ταυτί γε, [Refs]; τουτοδί for τουτὶ δέ, [Refs]; τουτουμενί for τουτουὶ μέν, [Refs] —In codices the ν ἐφελκυστικόν is sometimes added in the forms οὑτοσίν, οὑτωσίν, and οὑτοσίν is said to be Attic dialect by [Refs 2nd c.AD+]. [This ι is always long, and a long vowel or diphthong before it becomes short, as αὑτη?~Xί, τουτω?~Xί, οὑτοῐί, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) USAGE in regard to CONCOR[Refs 4th c.BC+] is frequently used as a pronoun substantive: hence neuter is followed by genitive, κατὰ τοῦτο τῆς ἀκροπόλιος [Refs 5th c.BC+] adjective, in which case its substantive commonly takes the Article, οὗτος ὁ ἀνήρ or ὁ ἀνὴρ οὗτος.—But the Article is absent, B.1) always in Epic dialect Poets (except [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes also in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) sometimes when the Noun is so specified that the Article is not needed, ἐς γῆν ταύτην, ἥντινα νῦν Σκύθαι νέμονται [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.3) when οὗτος is used in local sense, here, see below with [Refs] B.4) when the Noun with which οὗτος agrees stands as its Predicate, αὕτη γὰρ ἦν σοι πρόφασις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δικαστοῦ αὕτη ἀρετή [ἐστι] [Refs 5th c.BC+] these were the grievances which already existed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταύτην φήμην παρέδοσαν this was the report which, [Refs 5th c.BC+] this was notably the greatest movement which, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.5) when 3rd pers. is used for 2nd pers. to express contempt, οὗτος ἀνήρ, οὑτοσὶ ἀνήρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) though οὗτος usually agrees with the Noun that serves as Predicate, it is not rare to find it in the neuter, μανία δὲ καὶ τοῦτ᾽ ἐστί [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and in plural, οὐκ ἔστι ταῦτα ἀρχή [Refs 4th c.BC+]: so with an explanatory clause added, τοῦτο γάρ ἐστιν ὁ συκοφάντης, αἰτιᾶσθαι μὲν πάντα ἐξελέγξαι δὲ μηδέν [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.2) so also with a Noun in apposition, τούτοισιν μὲν ταῦτα μέλει, κίθαρις καὶ ἀοιδή [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.II.3) the neuter also may refer to a masculine or feminine Noun, καρπὸν φορέει κυάμῳ ἴσον: τοῦτο ἐπεὰν γένηται πέπον κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.4) the neuter is also used of classes of persons, μελιτοπῶλαι καὶ τυροπῶλαι: τοῦτο δ᾽ εἰς ἕν ἐστι συγκεκυφός [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or of an abstract fact, οὐκ Ἰοφῶν ζ;—τοῦτο γάρ τοι καὶ μόνον ἔτ᾽ ἐστὶ λοιπὸν ἀγαθόν [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) with Prons, B.III.1) personal, οὗτος σύ, in local sense, see below B.III.2) interrogative, τί τοῦτ᾽ ἔλεξα; what is this that? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ποίοισι τούτοι; for ποῖά ἐστι ταῦτα οἷς [ἔχεις ἐλπίδα]; [Refs]; Νέστορ᾽ ἔρειο ὅν τινα τοῦτον ἄγει whom he brings here, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.3) with οἷος, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.4) possessive, πατὴρ σὸς οὗτος this father of thine, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.5) demonstrative, οὗτος ἐκεῖνος, τὸν σὺ ζητέεις, where ἐκεῖνος is the Predicate, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦτον τὸν αὐτὸν ἄνδρα this same man, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.5.b) exceptionally, Διφίλου οὗτος ὅδ᾽ ἐστὶ τύπος [Refs] B.III.6) ἄλλος τις οὗτος ἀνέστη another man here, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.IV) with Numerals, τέθνηκε ταῦτα τρία ἔτη these three years, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [στρατείαν] ἑνδέκατον μῆνα τουτονὶ ποιεῖται for these eleven months, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) SIGNIFICATION AND SPECIAL IDIOMS: C.I) this, to designate the nearer, opposed to ἐκεῖνος, that, the more remote, ταῦτα, like τὰ ἐνταῦθα, things round and about us, earthly things, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare ὅδε [near the start]: but οὗτος sometimes indicates that which is not really nearest, but most important, δεῖ. τὸ βέλτιστον ἀεί, μὴ τὸ ῥᾷστον λέγειν: ἐπὶ ἐκεῖνο μὲν γὰρ ἡ φύσις αὐτὴ βαδιεῖται, ἐπὶ τοῦτο δὲ κτλ. [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.2) when, of two things, one precedes and the other follows, ὅδε properly refers to what follows, οὗτος to what precedes, οὐκ ἔστι σοι ταῦτ᾽, ἀλλά σοι τάδ᾽ ἔστι [Refs 5th c.BC+] refers to what follows, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὔκουν. τοῦτο γιγνώσκεις, ὅτι; [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.3) οὗτος is used emphatic, generally in contempt, while ἐκεῖνος denotes praise, ὁ πάντ᾽ ἄναλκις οὗτος, i.e. Aegisthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+] of Philip; but οὗτος is used of Philip, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.3.b) of what is familiar, τούτους τοὺς πολυτελεῖς χιτῶνας, of the Persians, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ θυλακῶδες τοῦτο the familiar bag-like thing, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.I.4) in Attic dialect law-language, οὗτος is commonly applied to the opponent, whether plaintiff (as in [Refs 4th c.BC+] or defendant (as in [Refs]; so, in the political speeches of [Refs 4th c.BC+] are the opposite party, [Refs], etc; but in the forensic speeches, οὗτοι frequently means the judges, the court, [Refs] C.I.5) much like an adverb, in local sense (compare ὅδε [near the start]), τίς δ᾽ οὗτος κατὰ νῆας. ἔρχεα; who art thou here that comest? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; frequently in Attic dialect, τίς οὑτοσ; who's this here? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πολλὰ ὁρῶ ταῦτα πρόβατα I see many sheep here, [Refs 5th c.BC+] ho you! you there! [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with a proper name, ὦ οὗτος, Αἴας [Refs 5th c.BC+] —This phrase mostly implies anger, impatience, or scorn. C.II) simply as antecedent to ὅς, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.III) = τοιοῦτος, οὗτος ἐγὼ ταχυτᾶτι [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.IV) after a parenthesis, the Subject, though already named, is frequently emphatic repeated by οὗτος, οὐδὲ γὰρ οὐδὲ Ἀριστέης, οὐδὲ οὗτος προσωτέρω. ἔφησε ἀπικέσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.V) καὶ οὗτος is added to heighten the force of a previous word, ξυνεστῶτες. ναυτικῷ ἀγῶνι, καὶ τούτῳ πρὸς Ἀθηναίους [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see infr. VIII.2. C.VI) repeated, where for the second we should merely say he or it, τοῖσιν τούτου τοῦτον μέλεσιν. κελαδοῦντες [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII) ταῦτα is used in some special phrases, C.VII.1) ταῦτ᾽, ὦ δέσποτα yes Sir (i. e. ἔστι ταῦτα, ταῦτα δράσω, etc.), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so also ἦν ταῦτα even so, true, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII.2) ταῦτα μὲν δὴ ὑπάρξει so it shall be, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII.3) καὶ ταῦτα μὲν δὴ ταῦτα so much for that, frequently in Attic dialect, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VII.4) ταῦτα at end of a formula in epitaphs, etc, probably short for ταῦτα οὕτως ἔχει or ὁ βίος ταῦτά ἐστιν, e.g. οὐδὶς (= -εὶς) ἀθάνατος: ταῦτα [Refs 2nd c.AD+] C.VIII) Adverbial usages: C.VIII.1) ταῦταabsolutely, therefore, that is why, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ ταῦτα ἥκω, ἵνα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] is rare in this sense, τοῦτ᾽ ἀφικόμην, ὅπως. εὖ πράξαιμί τι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ γὰρ τοῦτο just because of this, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.1.b) πρὸς ταῦτα so then, therefore, properly used in indignant defiance, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.2) καὶ ταῦτα, adding a circumstance heightening the force of what has been said, and that, ἄνδρα γενναῖον θανεῖν, καὶ ταῦτα πρὸς γυναικός [Refs 4th c.BC+]: but mostly with a participle, ὅς γ᾽ ἐξέλυσας ἄστυ, καὶ ταῦθ᾽ ὑφ᾽ ἡμῶν οὐδὲν ἐξειδὼς πλέον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or with a participle omitted, ἥτις. τὴν τεκοῦσαν ὕβρισεν, καὶ ταῦτα τηλικοῦτος (i.e. οὖσα) [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.2.b) καὶ ταῦτα anyhow, no matter what happens (or happened), ἐπεχείρησας, οὐδὲν ὢν καὶ ταῦτα you tried, but were no good anyhow, i.e. try as you might, [Refs 4th c.BC+] C.VIII.3) τοῦτο μέν, τοῦτο δέ. on the one hand, on the other, partly, partly, very frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦτο μέν is sometimes answered by δέ only,[Refs 5th c.BC+]; by δὲ αὖ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by ἔπειτα δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by ἀλλά, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; by εἶτα, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by τοῦτ᾽ αὖθις, [Refs] C.VIII.4) dative feminine ταύτῃ, C.VIII.4.a) on this spot, here, ταύτῃ μὲν, τῇδε δ᾽ αὖ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.4.b) in this point, herein, μηδὲν ταύτῃ γε κομήσῃς [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.4.c) in this way, thus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; to ὅπῃ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταύτῃ καλεῖσθαι, etc, like οὕτω κ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.5) ἐκ τούτου or τούτων thereupon, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; therefore, [Refs] C.VIII.6) ἐν τούτῳ in that case, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.6.b) in the meantime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.VIII.7) πρὸς τούτοις (-οισι) besides, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
οὗτος
Transliteration:
hoûtos
Pronounciation:
how'-tahee
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the he (she or it), i.e. this or that (often with article repeated); he (it was that), hereof, it, she, such as, the same, these, they, this (man, same, woman), which, who; from the article g3588 (ὁ) and g846 (αὐτός);

however,
Strongs:
Word:
δὲ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
but
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most freq. without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative);

with fragrant oil
Strongs:
Word:
μύρῳ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Dative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a neuter PERSON OR THING that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
ointment
Tyndale
Word:
μύρον
Transliteration:
muron
Gloss:
ointment
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
μύρον, -ου, τό [in LXX chiefly for שֶׁמֶן, Pro.27:9, Psa.133:2, al;] ointment: Mat.26:7, 12, Mrk.14:3-5, Luk.7:37-38, 46 23:56, Jhn.11:2 12:3, 5, Rev.18:13. SYN.: ἔλαιον, q.v (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
μύρον
Transliteration:
muron
Gloss:
ointment
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
μύρον [ῠ], τό, sweet oil, unguent, perfume, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; mixed with wine, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; various kinds in [Refs 1st c.AD+]; μ. Μενδήσιον, ἠθητόν, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] sweet oil on lentils, i.e. 'a jewel of gold in a swine's snout', [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) place where unguents were sold, perfume-market, τὰ μειράκια. τἀν τῷ μ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) metaphorically, anything graceful or charming, [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
μύρον
Transliteration:
mýron
Pronounciation:
moo'-ron
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Neuter
Definition:
"myrrh", i.e. (by implication) perfumed oil; ointment; probably of foreign origin (compare h4753, g4666 (σμύρνα));

anointed
Strongs:
Word:
ἤλειψεν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to anoint
Tyndale
Word:
ἀλείφω
Transliteration:
aleiphō
Gloss:
to anoint
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἀλείφω (cf. λίπος, oil), [in LXX: Gen.31:13, Exo.40:15, Num.3:3 (מָשַׁח), Eze.13:10 ff. (טוּחַ), Rut.3:3, 2Ki.12:20 14:2, 4Ki.4:2, 2Ch.28:15, Mic.6:15, Dan LXX TH Dan.10:3 (סוּךְ), Est.2:12, Jdth.16:8 *;] to anoint, festally or in homage: with accusative of thing(s) or of person(s), Mat.6:17, Jhn.12:3, Mrk.16:1; before dative, ἐλαίῳ, Mrk.6:13, Jas.5:14; μύρῳ, Luk.7:38, 46, Jhn.11:2. SYN.: χρίω, μυρίζω (against the distinction made bet. ἀ. and χ. in Tr, Syn., § 38, see MM, VGT, see word, ἀ.) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἀλείφω
Transliteration:
aleiphō
Gloss:
to anoint
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἀλείφω, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: future -ψω[LXX], (ἐξ-) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist ἤλειψα[Refs 8th c.BC+], Attic dialect, Epic dialect ἄλειψα[Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect ἀλήλῐφα (ἀπ-) [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—middle, future -ψομαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist ἠλειψάμην Attic dialect, Epic dialect ἀλ-[Refs 8th c.BC+] —passive, future ἀλειφθήσομαι (ἐξ-) [Refs 4th c.BC+]: aorist 1 ἠλείφθην[Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist 2 ἐξ-ηλίφην variant in [Refs 5th c.BC+], (ἀπ-) [Refs 5th c.BC+], (ἐξ, ὑπ-) [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—anoint the skin with oil, as was done after bathing, active referring to another, middle to oneself, λοῦσαι κέλετ᾽ ἀμφί τ᾽ ἀλεῖψαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]: later of anointing for gymnastic exercises, λίπα μετὰ τοῦ γυμνάζεσθαι ἠλείψαντο[Refs 6th c.BC+]; of anointing the sick, [NT+4th c.BC+] 2) supply oil for gymnasts, ἀλειφούσης τῆς πόλεως [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ἀ. πανήγυριν, ἔθνη, [Refs]; οἱ -όμενοι youths undergoing gymnastic training, [Refs]; οἱ ἀ. ἐν τῷ γυμνασίῳ [Refs]; ἀλείφεσθαι παρά τινι to attend a gymnastic school, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 3) polish, τράπεζαν[Refs 4th c.BC+] 4) metaphorically, prepare as if for gymnastics, encourage, stimulate, instigate, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, τοὺς -ομένους ἐπί τι[Refs 5th c.BC+] II) daub, plaster, besmear, οὔατα ἀλεῖψαι stop up ears, [Refs 8th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἀλείφω
Transliteration:
aleíphō
Pronounciation:
al-i'-fo
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to oil (with perfume); anoint; from g1 (Α) (as particle of union) and the base of g3045 (λιπαρός);

the
Strongs:
Word:
τοὺς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Plural Masculine
Grammar:
SPECIFIC male people or things that are having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»024:G4228
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

feet
Strongs:
Word:
πόδας
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Plural Masculine
Grammar:
male PEOPLE OR THINGS that are having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
foot
Tyndale
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
pous
Gloss:
foot
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πούς, ποδός, ὁ [in LXX chiefly for רֶגֶל;] a foot, both of men and beasts: Mat.4:6 (LXX), Mrk.9:45, Luk.1:79, Jhn.11:44, Act.7:5, al; ὑπο τοὺς π, Rom.16:20, 1Co.15:25 15:27 Eph.1:22, Heb.2:8; ὑποκάτω τῶν π, Mat.22:44 (LXX); πρὸς (παρὰ) τοὺς π, Mrk.5:22, Luk.8:41, al; figuratively, Mat.15:30, Luk.10:39, Act.5:2, al; ἔμπροσθεν τῶν π, Rev.3:9 19:10, al; ἐπὶ τοὺς π, Act.10:25. By meton, of a person in motion (Psa.119:101): Luk.1:79, Act.5:9, Rom.3:15 10:15, Heb.12:13 (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
pous
Gloss:
foot
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πούς, ὁ, ποδός, ποδί, πόδα (not ποῦν, Thom.Mag.p.257 R.): dative plural ποσί, Epic dialect and Lyric poetry ποσσί (also [Refs 5th c.BC+] once πόδεσι [Refs 5th c.BC+] Epic dialect ποδοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—Doric dialect nominative πός (compare ἀρτίπος, πούλυπος, etc.) [Refs], but πούς [Refs]; πῶς· πός, ὑπὸ Δωριέων, [Refs 5th c.AD+] (perhaps πός· πούς, ὑ.Δ.); Laconian dialect πόρ, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]:—foot, both of men and beasts, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in plural, also, a bird's talons, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; arms or feelers of a polypus, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: properly the foot from the ankle down wards, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ξύλινος π, of an artificial foot, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but also of the leg with the foot, as χείρ for the arm and hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 2) foot as that with which one runs, πόδας ὠκὺς Ἀχιλλεύς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; frequently with reference to swiftness, περιγιγνόμεθ᾽ ἄλλων πύξ τε. ἠδὲ πόδεσσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποσὶν ἐρίζειν to race on foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποδῶν τιμά, αἴγλα, ἀρετά, ὁρμά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (ποσσί, πόδεσσι) is added to many Verbs denoting motion, π. βήσετο, παρέδραμον, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also emphatically with Verbs denoting to trample or tread upon, πόσσι καταστείβοισι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; πόδα βαίνειν, see at {βαίνω} [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πόδα τιθέναι to journey, [Refs 5th c.BC+] started on its homeward way, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χειρῶν ἔκβαλλον ὀρείους πόδας ναός, i. e. oars, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φωνὴ τῶν π. τοῦ ὑετοῦ sound of the pattering of rain, [LXX] 3) as a point of measurement, ἐς πόδας ἐκ κεφαλῆς from head to foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4) πρόσθε ποδός or ποδῶν, προπάροιθε ποδῶν, just before one, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4.b) παρά or πὰρ ποδός off-hand, at once, ἀνελέσθαι πὰρ ποδός [Refs 6th c.BC+]close at hand, [Refs]; but παραὶ ποσὶ κάππεσε θυμός sank to their feet, [Refs 8th c.BC+]in a moment, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; close behind, Νέμεσις δέ γε πὰρ πόδας (to be read πόδα) βαίνει Prov. cited in [Refs]; also παρὰ πόδας immediately afterwards [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; τὰ ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ καὶ παρὰ πόδας at his very feet, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.c) ἐν ποσί in one's way, close at hand, τὸν ἐν π. γινόμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]everyday matters, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.d) τὸ πρὸς ποσί, ={τὸ ἐν ποσί}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.e) all these phrases are opposed to ἐκ ποδῶν out of the way, far off, written ἐκποδών [Refs 5th c.BC+] 5) to denote close pursuit, ἐκ ποδὸς ἕπεσθαι follow in the track, i.e. close behind, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 5.b) in earlier writers κατὰ πόδας on the heels of a person, [LXX+5th c.BC+]on the moment, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ κατὰ πόδας ἡμέρα the very next day, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] catch it running, [Refs 5th c.BC+] march, come close at his heels, on his track, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῇ κατὰ π. ἡμέρᾳ τῆς ἐκκλησίας on the day immediately after it, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 6) various phrases: 6.a) ἀνὰ πόδα backwards, [Refs 5th c.AD+] 6.b) ἐπὶ πόδα backwards facing the enemy, ἐπὶ π. ἀναχωρεῖν, ἀνάγειν, ἀναχάζεσθαι, to retire without turning to fly, leisurely, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but γίνεται ἡ ἔξοδος οἷον ἐπὶ πόδας the offspring is as it were born feetforemost, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 6.c) περὶ πόδα, properly of a shoe, round the foot, i.e. fitting exactly, ὡς ἔστι μοι τὸ χρῆμα τοῦτο περὶ πόδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.d) ὡς ποδῶνἔχει as he is off for feet, i. e. as quick as he can, ὡς ποδῶν εἶχον [τάχιστα] ἐβοήθεον [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.e) ἔξω τινὸς πόδα ἔχειν keep one's foot out of a thing, i. e. be clear of it, ἔξω κομίζων πηλοῦ πόδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.f) ἀμφοῖν ποδοῖν, etc, to denote energetic action, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τερπωλῆς ἐπέβημεν ὅλῳ ποδί with all the foot, i.e. entirely, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.g) τὴν ὑπὸ πόδα [κατάστασιν] just below them, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ὑπὸ πόδας τίθεσθαι trample under foot, scorn, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; οἱ ὑπὸ πόδα those next below them (in rank), [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ὑπὸ πόδα χωρεῖν recede, decline, of strength, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] middle cited in [Refs 4th c.AD+] 6.h) for ὀρθῷ ποδί, see at {ὀρθός} [Refs] 6.k) ἁλιεῖς ἀπὸ ποδός probably fishermen who fish from the land, not from boats, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ποτίσαι ἀπὸ ποδός perhaps irrigate by the feet (of oxen turning the irrigation-wheel), [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; τόπον. ἀπὸ ποδὸς ἐξηρτισμένον uncertain meaning in [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 1) ἀγγεῖον. τρήματα ἐκ τῶν ὑπὸ ποδὸς ἔχον round the bottom, [Refs 1st c.AD+] 7) πούς τινος, as periphrastic for a person as coming, etc, σὺν πατρὸς μολὼν ποδί, i.e. σὺν πατρί, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ἐξ ἑνὸς ποδός, i.e. μόνος ὤν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ δ᾽ ἀφ᾽ ἡσύχου π, i.e. οἱ ἡσύχως ζῶντες, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) metaphorically, of things, foot, lowest part, especially foot of a hill, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of a table, couch, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare πέζ; of the side strokes at the foot of the letter Ω, Callias cited in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ={ποδεών}[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) in a ship, πόδες are the two lower corners of the sail, or the ropes fastened therelo, by which the sails are tightened or slackened, sheets [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χαλᾶν πόδα ease off the sheet, as is done when a squall is coming, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦ ποδὸς παρίει let go hold of it, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐκπετάσουσι πόδα ναός (with reference to the sail), [Refs 5th c.BC+] haul it tight, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ναῦς ἐνταθεῖσα ποδί a ship with her sheet close hauled, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2.b) perhaps of the rudder or steering-paddle, αἰεὶ γὰρ πόδα νηὸς ἐνώμων [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) a foot, as a measure of length, = [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) foot in Prosody, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so of a metrical phrase or passage, ἔκμετρα καὶ ὑπὲρ τὸν π. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of a long passage declaimed in one breath, κήρυκες ὅταν τὸν καλούμενον πόδα μέλλωσιν ἐρεῖν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) boundary stone, [Refs 4th c.BC+]. (Cf. Latin pes, Gothic fotus, etc. 'foot'; related to πέδον as noted by [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
poús
Pronounciation:
pooce
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a "foot" (figuratively or literally); foot(-stool); a primary word;

of Me.
Strongs:
Word:
μου
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun 1st Genitive Singular
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned person or thing that is speaking or writing that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
my
Conjoined:
«024:G4228
Tyndale
Word:
ἐγώ
Transliteration:
egō
Gloss:
I/we
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
ἐγώ, genitive, etc, ἐμοῦ, ἐμοί, ἐμέ (enclitic μου, μοι, με), pl. ἡμεῖς, -ῶν, -ῖν, -ᾶς, of person(s) pron. I. (a) The nom. is usually emphatic, when expressed as subjc, as in Mat.3:11, Mrk.1:8, Luk.3:16, al. But often there is no apparent emphasis, as Mat.10:16, Jhn.10:17; ἰδοὺ ἐ. (= Heb. הִנֵּנִי, cf. 1Ki.3:8), Act.9:10; ἐ. (like Heb. אֲנִי), I am, Jhn.1:23 (LXX), Act.7:32 (LXX). (b) The enclitic forms (see supr.) are used with nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, where there is no emphasis: ἐν τ. πατρί μου, Jhn.14:20; μου τ. λόγους, Mat.7:24; ὀπίσω μου, Mat.3:11; ἰσχυρότερός μου, ib; λέγει μοι, Rev.5:5; also with the prep. πρός, as Mrk.9:19, al. The full forms (ἐμοῦ, etc.) are used with the other prepositions, as δι᾽ ἐμοῦ, ἐν ἐμοί, εἰς ἐμέ, etc, also for emphasis, as Luk.10:16, Jhn.7:23, Mrk.14:7, al. (with) The genitive μου and ἡμῶν are often used for the poss. pronouns ἐμός, ἡμέτερος: τ. λαόν μου, Mat.2:6; μου τῂ ἀπιστιᾳ, Mrk.9:24. (d) τί ἐμοὶ καὶ σοί (= Heb. מַה־לִי וָלָךְ, Jdg.11:12, al.), i.e. what have we in common: Mat.8:29, Mrk.1:24, 5:7, Luk.8:28, Jhn.2:4; τί γάρ μοι, 1Co.5:2. (e) The interchange of ἐγώ and ἡμεῖς, common in π, appears in Pauline Epp. (see M, Pr., 86f, M, Th., 131f.). (f) κἀγώ (= καὶ ἐγώ), and I, even I, I also: Mat.2:8, Luk.2:48, Jhn.6:56, Rom.3:7, 1Co.7:40, al; κἀγώ. καί, both. and, Jhn.7:28. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἐγώ
Transliteration:
egō
Gloss:
I/we
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
ἐγώ, I: pronoun of the first person:—Epic dialect mostly ἐγών before vowels (so in Doric dialect, before consonants, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect ἱών [Refs 2nd c.AD+]:— strengthened ἔγωγε, I at least, for my part, indeed, for myself (more frequently in Attic dialect than in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: Doric dialect ἐγώνγα [Refs 7th c.BC+]: Boeotian dialect ἱώνγα [Refs 6th c.BC+]; ἱώνει [Refs]; ἰώγα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: Laconian dialect and Tarentum dialect ἐγώνη, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) oblique cases from a different root, genitive ἐμοῦ, enclitic μο; Ionic dialect and Epic dialect ἐμέο, ἐμεῦ, μευ, also ἐμέθεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἔμεθεν [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἐμέος, ἐμεῦς, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect ἐμοῦς [Refs 6th c.BC+] — _dative_ ἐμοί, enclitic μοι (which may be compared with Sanskrit genitive me in κλῦθί μοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἐμίν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Tarentum dialect ἐμίνη [Refs 3rd c.BC+], enclitic μ; [Refs 5th c.AD+] III) dual, nominative and accusative, νῶι, we two, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; accusative νῶιν Zenod.ad [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Attic dialect νώ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; νῶι dative, [Refs 5th c.AD+]; νῶιν, ={ἡμῖν}, [Refs 4th c.AD+] IV) plural, nominative ἡμεῖς (ἡμέες falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἄμμες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ἁμές [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ἡμέων [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἀμμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἄμμων [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Doric dialect ἁμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἁμῶν [[Refs 5th c.BC+]; Cretan dialect, Boeotian dialect ἁμίων [Refs 5th c.BC+] (ῐ) (or ἧμιν Aristarch.ad [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also rarely in Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἄμμῐν, ἄμμῐ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect also ἁμίν or ἇμιν, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; with ῑ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ἡμέας [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἥμεας [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect ἄμμε [Refs 8th c.BC+], Theocr.8.25; Doric dialect ἁμέ [Refs 6th c.BC+]—On these dialectic varieties, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] ff. (Cf. Sanskrit ahám (ἐγών), accusative plural asmā´n; for νώ cf. Sanskrit nau):—frequently in answers, as an affirmative, especially in form ἔγωγε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὗτος ἐ. here am [Refs 5th c.BC+]; rarely with Article, τὸν ἐμέ myself, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the Self, the Ego, [Refs 5th c.AD+]; τίς ὢν οὗτος ὁ ἐγὼ τυγχάν; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τί τοῦτ᾽ ἐμο; ἡμῖν τί τοῦτ᾽ ἔστ; Latin quid mea hoc refert? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐγ; in a question, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡμεῖς the self, ἔνθα δὴ ἡμεῖς μάλιστα [Refs 3rd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
ἐγώ
Transliteration:
egṓ
Pronounciation:
eg-o'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
; I, me; a primary pronoun of the first person I (only expressed when emphatic)