Lucas 22:31

31 Y penó ó Erañoró buter: Simon, Simon, diquela que Satanas ha mangado tucue somia zarandear tucue sasta gi.
said
Strongs:
Word:
εἶπεν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb 2nd Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Translators:
Translated in the KJV (Textus Receptus), but not in most modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland).
Editions:
Additional:
to say
Tyndale
Word:
ἔπω, ἐρῶ, εἶπον
Transliteration:
epō, erō, eipon
Gloss:
to say
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
1. to speak, say , (Homer), etc; in parenthesis, ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν so to say , Lat. ut ita dicam, (Thucydides), etc; so, ὡς εἰπεῖν, ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν (Thucydides) 2. with accusative pers. to speak to, address, accost one, (Iliad by Homer) 3. to name, mention , (Iliad by Homer) 4. to call one so and so, πολλοὶ δέ μιν ἐσθλὸν ἔειπον (Odyssey by Homer) 5. with double accusative of persons or things, to say or tell of one, ἀτάσθαλόν τι εἰπεῖν τινα (Odyssey by Homer); κακὰ εἰπεῖν τινα (Aristophanes Comicus) 6. at Athens, to propose or move a measure in the ἐκκλησία, (Thucydides), etc. (ML)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἔπω, ἐρῶ, εἶπον
Transliteration:
epō, erō, eipon
Gloss:
to say
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
εἶπον (present ἔπω is used by [Refs 2nd c.BC+]present in use is φημί, λέγω, ἀγορεύω (see. infr. IV), the future ἐρέω, ἐρῶ, the perfect εἴρηκα), Epic dialect and Lyric poetry ἔειπον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; subjunctive εἴπω (Epic dialect εἴπωμι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; optative εἴποιμ; infinitive εἰπεῖν, Epic dialect -έμεναι, -έμεν, [Refs]; participle εἰπών: also aorist 1 εἶπα (ἔειπα [Refs 5th c.BC+] as I said, [Refs 1st c.BC+] mostly in Ionic dialect Prose, also [Refs 4th c.BC+], and the 2nd pers. indicative and imperative of this form are preferred in Attic dialect, 2nd pers. singular indicative εἶπας [Refs 8th c.BC+]; imperative εἶπον (on the accent see[Refs 5th c.BC+], -ατον, -ατ; 3rd.pers. plural εἶπαν [Refs 4th c.BC+]; participle εἴπας [Refs 4th c.BC+], Aeolic dialect εἴπαις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in compounds middle ἀπείπασθαι (which see), διείπασθαι (which see), but never in good Attic dialect: (reduplicate aorist 2 from ϝεπ- 'say'; ϝείπην only conjecture in [Refs 7th c.BC+]; with ἔ- (ϝ) ειπον cf. Sanskrit avocam, reduplicate aorist of vac- 'say'; compare ἔπος):—speak, say, ὣς εἰπών [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰπεῖν ἔν τισιν or μετά τισιν speak among a number, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τινί τι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τι [Refs 7th c.BC+] [same places], etc; τι ἔς or πρός τινα, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰπεῖν περί τινος, ἀμφί τινι, [Refs 8th c.BC+] of them, [Refs]; εἰπεῖν ὅτι or ὡς to say that, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but also with infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+] b. recite, ἔπη [Refs] 2) in parenthesis, ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν so to say, limiting a general statement, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; speaking loosely, opposed to ὄντως, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; opposed to ἀκριβεῖ λόγῳ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ξύμπαν εἶπαι, εἰπεῖν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) εἴποι τις as one might say, uncertain reading in [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) with accusative person, address, accost one, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) name, mention, [Refs] II.3) call one so and so, πολλοί τέ μιν ἐσθλὸν ἔειπον [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) with double accusative person et of things, tell or proclaim so of one, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰπεῖν τινα ὅτι. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ. τεθνεῶτ᾽ Ὀρέστην speak of him as dead, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.5) celebrate, of poets, Αἴαντος βίαν [Refs] III) with dative person et infinitive, order or command one to, [Refs 8th c.BC+]infinitive, [Refs]: with accusative et infinitive, εἶπον τὰς παῖδας δεῦρ᾽ ἄγειν τινά [Refs 5th c.BC+], frequently in NT, [NT] IV) propose, move a measure in the assembly, εἰπὼν τὰ βέλτιστα [Refs 4th c.BC+]: frequently as a formal prefix to decrees and laws, Λάχης εἶπε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare ἀγορεύω. V) plead, δίκην [Refs 8th c.BC+] VI) promise, offer, χρυσὸν εἶφ᾽ ὃς ἂν κτάνῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+] VII) imperative εἰπέ sometimes used in addressing several persons, [Refs 5th c.BC+] ἔπω, A) say, call, name, ἤν Πέρσειον ἔπουσιν [Refs 2nd c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἔπω
Transliteration:
épō
Pronounciation:
ep'-o
Language:
Greek
Definition:
to speak or say (by word or writing); answer, bid, bring word, call, command, grant, say (on), speak, tell; a primary verb (used only in the definite past tense, the others being borrowed from g2046 (ἐρέω), g4483 (ῥέω), and g5346 (φημί));

now
Strongs:
Word:
δὲ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated in the KJV (Textus Receptus), but not in most modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland).
Editions:
Additional:
and
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most freq. without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative);

(the)
Strongs:
Word:
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated in the KJV (Textus Receptus), but not in most modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland).
Editions:
Additional:
the
Conjoined:
»00108:G2962
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

Lord
Strongs:
Word:
κύριος
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated in the KJV (Textus Receptus), but not in most modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland).
Editions:
Additional:
lord (God)
Tyndale
Word:
κύριος
Transliteration:
kurios
Gloss:
: God
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
κύριος, -α, -ον (also -ος, -ον), [in LXX (subst.) chiefly for יהוה, also for בַּעַל,אָדוֹן, etc;] having power (κῦρος) or authority; as subst, ὁ κ, lord, master; 1) in general: with genitive of thing(s), Mat.9:38 20:8, Mrk.12:9 13:35, Luk.19:33; τ. σαββάτου, Mat.12:8, Mrk.2:28, Luk.6:5; with genitive of person(s), δούλου, etc, Mat.10:24, Luk.14:21, Act.16:16, al; absol, opp. to οἱ δοῦλοι, Eph.6:5, 9 al; of the Emperor (Deiss, LAE, 161), Act.25:26; θεοὶ πολλοὶ καὶ κ. πολλοί, 1Co.8:5; of a husband, 1Pe.3:6; in voc, as a title of respect to masters, teachers, magistrates, etc, Mat.13:27 16:22 27:63, Mrk.7:28, Luk.5:12, Jhn.4:11, Act.9:5, al. 2) As a divine title (freq. in π; Deiss, LAE, 353 ff.); in NT, (a) of God: ὁ κ, Mat.5:33, Mrk.5:19, Luk.1:6, Act.7:33, Heb.8:2, Jas.4:15, al; anarth. (Bl, §46, 6), Mat.21:9, Mrk.13:20, Luk.1:17, Heb.7:21, 1Pe.1:25, al; κ. τ. οὐρανοῦ καὶ τ. γῆς, Mat.11:25; τ. κυριευόντων, 1Ti.6:15; κ. ὁ θεός, Mat.4:7, 10 al; id. before παντοκράτωρ, Rev.4:8; κ. σαβαώθ, Rom.9:29; (ὁ) ἄγγελος κυρίου, Mat.1:20 2:13, Luk.1:11, al; πνεῦμα κυρίου, Luk.4:18, Act.8:39; (b) of the Christ: Mat.21:3, Mrk.11:3, Luk.1:43 20:44, al; of Jesus after his resurrection (Dalman, Words, 330), Act.10:36, Rom.14:8, 1Co.7:22, Eph.4:5, al; ὁ κ. μου, Jhn.20:28; ὁ κ. Ἰησοῦς, Act.1:21, 1Co.11:23, al; id. before Χριστός, Eph.1:2, al; ὁ κ. ἡμῶν, 1Ti.1:14, Heb.7:14, al; id. before Ἰησοῦς, 1Th.3:11, Heb.13:20, al; Χριστός, Rom.16:18; Ἰ Χ, 1Co.1:2, 1Th.1:3, al; Ἰ. Χ. (Χ. Ἰ) ὁ κ. (ἡμῶν), Rom.1:4, Col.2:6, Eph.3:11, al; ὁ κ. καὶ ὁ σωτὴρ, 2Pe.3:2; id. before Ἰ. Χ, ib. 18; anarth, 1Co.7:22, 25 Jas.5:4, al; κ. κυρίων, Rev.19:16; with prep, ἀπὸ (κατὰ, πρὸς, σὺν, etc.) κ, Col.3:24, al. SYN: see: δεσπότης. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
κύριος
Transliteration:
kurios
Gloss:
: God
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
κύριος [ῡ], α, ον, also ος, ον [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—Thess. κῦρρος [Refs 8th c.BC+]: I) of persons, having power or authority over, with genitive, Ζεὺς ὁ πάντων κ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρὶν ἄν σε κ. στήσω τέκνων put thee in possession of, [Refs 5th c.BC+], of the god to whom a temple is dedicated, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; τῶν αὑτοὺ κ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; θανάτου κ. τινός with power of life and death over, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) κύριός εἰμι with infinitive, I have authority to do, am entitled to do, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; οὗτος κ. ὁρκωμοτεῖν (probably to be read instead of -ῶν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; -ώτεροι δοῦναι better able to give, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also κ. τοῦ μὴ μεθυσθῆναι having power not to, [Refs]: with accusative et infinitive, κ. εἶναι ἢ τοίαν εἶναι [πόλιν] ἢ τοίαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.3) followed by a dependent clause, κ. γενέσθαι, ὅντινα δεῖ καταστήσασθαι [Refs 4th c.BC+] I.4) with participle, πριαμένους τι ἢ πωλοῦντας κυρίους εἶναι [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.5) absolutely, having authority, supreme, τί τῶνδε κυριωτέρους μένει; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ πατὴρ μέχρι τούτου κ. [ἐστι] [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὸ κ. the sovereign power in a state, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ κ. the supreme authorities, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; at Athens, κ. ἐκκλησία a sovereign or principal assembly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) of things, ὁ τῆς ὥρας τῆς καταρχῆς κ. [ἀστήρ] [Refs 2nd c.BC+]: but usually absolutely, authoritative, decisive, δίκαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μῦθος -ώτερος of more authority, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; -ωτάτη τῶν ἐπιστημῶν [ἡ πολιτική] [Refs 4th c.BC+]; -ωτέρα ἡ καθόλου [ἀπόδειξις] [Refs 4th c.BC+]; of sovereign remedies, - ωτάτη τῶν καθάρσεων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; important, principal, κ. δόξαι, of certain doctrines of Epicurus, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὰ -ώτατα the principal organs, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] (but, the most important matters, [Refs 4th c.BC+] principal accent, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] II.2) opposed to ἄκυρος, valid, νόμος, δόγματα, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. ποιεῖν [τὴν γνῶσιν], opposed to ἄκυρον π, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔστω τὰ κριθέντα κ. Legal cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) of times, etc, ordained, appointed, ἡ κυρίη ἡμέρη [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; κ. μήν, of a woman with child, i.e. the ninth month, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅταν τὸ κ. μόλῃ φάος (probably) the appointed time, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἡ κ. [ἡμέρα] [Refs 4th c.BC+] but αἱ κ. [ἡμεραι], ={κριτικαί}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4) legitimate, lawful, ὕπνος πόνος τε, κ. ξυνωμόται [Refs 4th c.BC+]; κύρι᾽ ἔχοντες having lawful power, [Refs] II.5) ἡ κ. ἀρετή goodness proper, real goodness, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; Rhet. and Grammars, κ. ὄνομα the real or actual, hence current, ordinary, name of a thing, opposed to μεταφορά, γλῶττα, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σπάνει κυρίου ὀνόματος for lack of a current term, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; -ώτατα ὀνόματα most ordinary terms, [Refs]proper, personal name, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ὄνομα alone in this sense, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; κ. [λέξεις] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κατὰ τὸν κ. τρόπον, opposed to καταχρωμένη, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) adverb κυρίως, see entry B) substantive κύριος, ὁ, lord, master, τοῖσι κ. δωμάτων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ κ. alone, head of a family, master of a house (compare [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also, guardian of a woman, [Refs 4th c.BC+], etc: generally, guardian, trustee, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.b) later κύριε, as a form of respectful address, sir, [NT+2nd c.AD+] B.2) feminine κυρία, ἡ, mistress, lady of the house, [LXX+4th c.BC+]: in vocative, madam, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; applied to women from fourteen years upwards, [Refs 1st c.AD+]. (In later Gr. frequently written κύρα, [Refs 6th c.AD+] B.2.b) epithet of Ἶσις, [Refs 1st c.BC+] B.3) of gods, especially in the East, Σεκνεβτῦνις ὁ κ. θεός [Refs 1st c.BC+]; Κρόνος κ. [Refs 1st c.AD+]; Ζεὺς κ. [Refs 3rd c.AD+]; κ. Σάραπις [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of deified rulers, τοῦ κ. βασιλέος θεοῦ [Refs 1st c.BC+]; οἱ κ. θεοὶ μέγιστοι, of Ptolemy XIV and [Refs 1st c.BC+]; of Roman Emperors, [Refs] B.4) ὁ Κύριος, = Hebrew [LXX]; of Christ, [NT]
Strongs
Word:
κύριος
Transliteration:
kýrios
Pronounciation:
koo'-ree-os
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
supreme in authority, i.e. (as noun) controller; by implication, Master (as a respectful title); God, Lord, master, Sir; from (supremacy);

Simon,
Strongs:
Word:
σίμων
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Vocative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON that is being addressed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
Simon (Peter) @ Mat 4:18
Tyndale
Word:
Σίμων
Transliteration:
Simōn
Gloss:
Simon
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Male, Person
Definition:
Σίμων, -ωνος, ὁ a Greek name (transliterated סִימוֺן in Heb.) used as a substitute for Συμεών (which see), Simon 1) Simon Peter: Mat.17:25, Mrk.1:29, al. 2) Simon the Zealot (see: ζηλωτής, Καναναῖος): Mat.10:4, Mrk.3:18, Luk.6:15, Act.1:13. 3) One of the Brethren of our Lord (see: ἀδελψός): Mat.13:55, Mrk.6:3. 4) The father of Judas Iscariot, himself surnamed Ἰσκαριώτης (which see): Jhn.6:71 12:4 (Rec.) 13:2,26 5) Simon the Cyrenian: Mat.27:32, Mrk.15:21, Luk.23:26. 6) Simon the Pharisee: Luk.7:40, 43-44. 7) Simon of Bethany, surnamed ὁ λεπρός: Mat.26:6, Mrk.14:3. 8) Simon Magus, a Samaritan sorcerer: Act.8:9, 13 8:18, 24. 9) Simon the tanner, of Joppa: Act.9:43 10:6, 17 10:32 (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Σίμων
Transliteration:
Simōn
Gloss:
Simon
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Male, Person
Definition:
Σίμων [ῐ], ωνος, ὁ, [Refs], used proverbial of a confederate in evil, οἶδα Σίμωνα καὶ Σ. ἐμέ [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) name of a throw of the dice, [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
Σίμων
Transliteration:
Símōn
Pronounciation:
see'-mone
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
Simon (i.e. Shimon), the name of nine Israelites; Simon; of Hebrew origin (h8095);

Simon,
Strongs:
Word:
σίμων
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Vocative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON that is being addressed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
Simon (Peter) @ Mat 4:18
Tyndale
Word:
Σίμων
Transliteration:
Simōn
Gloss:
Simon
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Male, Person
Definition:
Σίμων, -ωνος, ὁ a Greek name (transliterated סִימוֺן in Heb.) used as a substitute for Συμεών (which see), Simon 1) Simon Peter: Mat.17:25, Mrk.1:29, al. 2) Simon the Zealot (see: ζηλωτής, Καναναῖος): Mat.10:4, Mrk.3:18, Luk.6:15, Act.1:13. 3) One of the Brethren of our Lord (see: ἀδελψός): Mat.13:55, Mrk.6:3. 4) The father of Judas Iscariot, himself surnamed Ἰσκαριώτης (which see): Jhn.6:71 12:4 (Rec.) 13:2,26 5) Simon the Cyrenian: Mat.27:32, Mrk.15:21, Luk.23:26. 6) Simon the Pharisee: Luk.7:40, 43-44. 7) Simon of Bethany, surnamed ὁ λεπρός: Mat.26:6, Mrk.14:3. 8) Simon Magus, a Samaritan sorcerer: Act.8:9, 13 8:18, 24. 9) Simon the tanner, of Joppa: Act.9:43 10:6, 17 10:32 (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Σίμων
Transliteration:
Simōn
Gloss:
Simon
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Male, Person
Definition:
Σίμων [ῐ], ωνος, ὁ, [Refs], used proverbial of a confederate in evil, οἶδα Σίμωνα καὶ Σ. ἐμέ [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) name of a throw of the dice, [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
Σίμων
Transliteration:
Símōn
Pronounciation:
see'-mone
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
Simon (i.e. Shimon), the name of nine Israelites; Simon; of Hebrew origin (h8095);

Behold,
Strongs:
Word:
ἰδοὺ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Interjection
Grammar:
an Interjection
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
look!
Tyndale
Word:
ἰδού
Transliteration:
idou
Gloss:
look!
Morphhology:
Greek, Interjection
Definition:
ἰδού, [in LXX chiefly for הִנֵּה,] prop. imperat. 2 aor. mid. of ὁράω, used as a demonstrative particle, with frequency much greater in LXX and NT than in cl. (see M, Pr., 11), lo, behold, see: Mat.10:16 11:8 13:3, Mrk.3:32, Luk.2:48, 1Co.15:51, Jas.5:9, Ju 14, Rev.1:7, al; after genitive absol, Mat.1:20 2:1, 13 12:46, al; καὶ ἰδού, Mat.2:9 (and freq.), Luk.1:20 10:25, Act.12:7, al; in elliptical sentences, taking the place of copula or predicate (like הִנֵּה in Heb.), Mat.3:17, Luk.5:12 22:31, 47 Act.8:27, 36 al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἰδού
Transliteration:
idou
Gloss:
look!
Morphhology:
Greek, Interjection
Definition:
ἰδοῦ (ἴδου Hdn.Gr. cited in [Refs 4th c.AD+]aorist 2 imperative middle of ὁρά; but, II) ἰδού (on the accent see Hdn.Gr.[Refs] adverb, lo! behold! (even with words of hearing, ἰδοὺ δοῦπον αὖ κλύω τινά [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.1) with Nouns and Prons, ἰ. χελιδών Klein [Refs 6th c.BC+], etc; ἰ. ἐγώ here am I, [LXX+NT]; οὐκ ἰ. Ἀαρώ; [LXX] II.2) with Verbs, II.2.a) in the imperative, ἰ. θεᾶσθε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in offering a thing, take it! ἰ. δέχου παῖ [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2.b) in indicative of all tenses, ἰ. πείθομαι [NT+5th c.BC+] with past tenses, [LXX+NT]; in the middle of a sentence, [NT] II.3) with questions, ἰ, τί ἔστι; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4) in repeating another's words quizzingly, as ἰδού γ᾽ ἄκρατον wine, quotha! [Refs]; ἰ. λέγειν[Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ἰδού
Transliteration:
idoú
Pronounciation:
id-oo'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
used as imperative lo!; ; --behold, lo, see; second person singular imperative middle voice of g1492 (εἴδω);

(the)
Strongs:
Word:
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
the
Conjoined:
»010:G4567
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

Satan
Strongs:
Word:
σατανᾶς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Masculine Title
Grammar:
a proper name of a male PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
Satan @ Deu 13:13
Tyndale
Word:
Σατανᾶς
Transliteration:
Satanas
Gloss:
Satan
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Title
Definition:
Σατανᾶς, -ᾶ (so also Sir 21:30, but in 3Ki.11:14, σατάν indecl; Heb. שָׂטָן; Aram. סָטָנָא, whence the inflected Gk. form), ό, Satan (i.e. the adversary, as in LXX, ll. with): Mat.4:10 12:26, Mrk.1:13 3:23, 26 4:15 Luk.10:18 11:18 13:16 22:3, 31, Jhn.13:27, Act.5:3 26:18, Rom.16:20, 1Co.5:5 7:5, 2Co.2:11 11:14, 1Th.2:18, 2Th.2:9, 1Ti.1:20 5:15, Rev.2:9, 13 2:24 3:9 12:9 20:2, 7; addressed in person of Peter, Mat.16:23 Mrk.8:33; ἄγγελος Σατανᾶ, 2Co.12:7. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Σατανᾶς
Transliteration:
Satanas
Gloss:
Satan
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Title
Definition:
Included with: Σᾰτάν or Σατᾶν, ὁ, “Satan”, Hebrew word for adversary, opponent, [LXX]; translated by ἐπίβουλος in [LXX]; also accuser, translated by ὁ διάβολος in [LXX]:—hence as chief of the evil spirits, the Devil, [NT] (indeclinable, as genitive); also Σᾰτᾰνᾶς, ᾶ, ὁ, [LXX], frequently in NT, [NT]:— adjective Σατανικός, ή, όν, [Refs 6th c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Σατανᾶς
Transliteration:
Satanâs
Pronounciation:
sat-an-as'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
the accuser, i.e. the devil; Satan; of Chaldee origin corresponding to h4566 (with the definite affix);

demanded to have
Strongs:
Word:
ἐξῃτήσατο
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Middle Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened to or for a person or thing being discussed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to demand
Tyndale
Word:
ἐξαιτέω
Transliteration:
exaiteō
Gloss:
to demand/ask for
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἐξ-αιτέω, -ῶ to ask from; mid, to ask for oneself, demand: aor, ἐξῃτήσατο, with accusative (obtained you by asking, R, mg.), Luk.22:31 (see Field, Notes, 76; Cremer, 73). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἐξαιτέω
Transliteration:
exaiteō
Gloss:
to demand/ask for
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἐξαιτ-έω, demand or ask for from another, with double accusative, τήνδε μ᾽ ἐξαιτεῖ χάριν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐ. τινὰ πατρός ask her in marriage from, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐ. τινά demand the surrender of a person, especially a criminal, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; demand a slave for torture, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐ. [τινὰ] βασανίζειν [Refs]; σμικρὸν ἐ. ask or beg for little, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) middle, ask for oneself, demand, active, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χάριν παρά τινος[NT]; πέμψον τὸν δαίμονα ὃν ἐξῃτησάμην for whose aid I prayed, [Refs] II.2) in middle also, ={παραιτοῦμαι}, beg off, gain his pardon or release, [Refs 5th c.BC+]make intercession for, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τοὺς κάτω. ἐξῃτησάμην τύμβου κυρῆσαι I begged of them to allow me to obtain, [Refs] II.3) with accusative of things, avert by begging, τὰ πρόσθεν σφάλματα [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἐξαιτέομαι
Transliteration:
exaitéomai
Pronounciation:
ex-ahee-teh'-om-ahee
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to demand (for trial); desire; middle voice from g1537 (ἐκ) and g154 (αἰτέω);

all of you
Strongs:
Word:
ὑμᾶς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun 2nd Accusative Plural
Grammar:
a reference to recently mentioned persons being spoken or written to that are having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
you
Conjoined:
«012:G1809
Tyndale
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
su
Gloss:
you
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
σύ, pron. of 2nd of person(s), thou, you, genitive, σοῦ, dative, σοί, accusative, σέ, pl, ὑμεῖς, -ῶν, -ῖν, -ᾶς (enclitic in oblique cases sing, except after prep. (BL, §48, 3), though πρὸς σέ occurs in Mat.25:39). Nom. for emphasis or contrast: Jhn.1:30, 4:10, 5:33, 39, 44, Act.4:7, Eph.5:32; so also perhaps σὺ εἶπας, Mat.26:64, al. (M, Pr., 86); before voc, Mat.2:6, Luk.1:76, Jhn.17:5, al; sometimes without emphasis (M, Pr., 85f.), as also in cl, but esp. as rendering of Heb. phrase, e.g. υἱός μου εἶ σύ (בְּנִי־אַתָּה, Psa.2:7), Act.13:33. The genitive (σοῦ, ὑμῶν) is sometimes placed bef. the noun: Luk.7:48, 12:30, al; so also the enclitic σοῦ, Mat.9:6; on τί ἐμοὶ κ. σοί, see: ἐγώ. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
su
Gloss:
you
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
σύ [ῠ], thou: pronoun of the second person:—Epic dialect nominative τύνη [ῡ] [Refs 8th c.BC+] (Laconian dialect τούνη [Refs 5th c.AD+]; Aeolic dialect σύ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect τύ [ῠ] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τού [short syllable] [Refs 6th c.BC+] (also τούν [Refs]σύ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]—Gen. σοῦ, [Refs], elsewhere only Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; enclitic σου, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (also in Lyric poetry, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (which also occurs in Lyric poetry, [Refs 7th c.BC+], and as enclitic σευ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], σεο (enclitic) [Refs] σευ (enclitic) [Refs]:—Doric dialect τεῦ, τευ, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; rarely τέο, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τεῦς [Refs 6th c.BC+]; Doric dialect τεοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοι variant in [Refs]; enclitic τεος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; other Doric dialect forms are τίω, τίως, both [Refs 3rd c.BC+]—Dat. σοί, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc; Doric dialect τοί [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect, Lesb, and Ionic dialect enclitic τοι[Refs 8th c.BC+], Lesbian Lyric poetry, and Ionic dialect Lyric poetry and Prose τοι is always enclitic, σοί never enclitic (τοί and σοι are not found except σοι [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in codices of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; rarer than τοι in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect both σοί and σοι (enclitic) are used (σοί [Refs 5th c.BC+], τοί and τοι are not used; σοι is never elided except in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect and Lyric poetry also τεΐν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τίν [ῐ], [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τίν [ῑ], [Refs 3rd c.BC+] before a consonant, [Refs 7th c.BC+]—Acc. σέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; enclitic σε,[Refs 7th c.BC+]; in late Gr. σέν, [Refs]; Doric dialect τέ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τ᾽ variant (codex R) in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τρέ (to be read τϝέ) [Refs 5th c.AD+]; or (enclitic) τυ [Refs 6th c.BC+] 2) in combination with γε, σύ γε, σέ γε, etc. (compare ἔγωγε), thou at least, for thy part, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] and Attic dialect; Doric dialect τύγε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τούγα [Refs 2nd c.AD+]: dative σοί γε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: accusative σέ γε [Refs], etc:—also σύ περ [Refs] 3) σύ with infinitive (as imperative), [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) Dual nominative and accusative σφῶϊ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], you two, both of you; σφώ (not σφῴ,[Refs 8th c.BC+]—Gen. and Dat. σφῶϊν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; contraction σφῷν once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]. None of these forms are enclitic, [Refs 5th c.BC+] enclitic; Ζεὺς σφὼ is prescribed in [Refs 8th c.BC+] —σφῶϊ is never dative; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] it is the accusative depending on κελεύ; σφῶϊν is never accusative; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) Plur. nominative ὑμεῖς, [Refs 8th c.BC+], ye, you; Aeolic dialect and Epic dialect ὔμμες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμές [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect οὐμές [Refs 6th c.BC+]; a resolved form ὑμέες, [Refs 1st c.BC+] rather than genuine Ionic [Refs 5th c.BC+]— Gen. ὑμῶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὑμέων (disyllable) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὑμέων also [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμέων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὑμῶν, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Aeolic dialect ὑμμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect οὐμίων [Refs 6th c.BC+]—Dat. ὑμῖν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect enclitic ὗμῐν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] also Doric dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Doric dialect (not enclitic) ὑμίν [ῐ] [Refs]; ὑμίν [ῐ] also in [Refs 5th c.BC+] should perhaps be restored where the sense needs an enclitic on the principle stated by [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ὕμιν[Refs 8th c.BC+]—Acc. ὑμᾶς, [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc. ( [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὗμας or (more probably) ὕμας is required by the metre in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Ionic dialect ὑμέας (disyllable) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; enclitic ὕμεας (disyllable) [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ὑμέας also [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect and Epic dialect ὔμμε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμέ [Refs 7th c.BC+]—The plural is sometimes used in addressing one person, when others are included in the speaker's thought, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] cf. Latin tu, Gothic pu; with τοι Sanskrit genitive and dative te; the origin of σφῶϊ is doubtful; with ὑμεῖς cf. Sanskrit accusative plural yusmān.)
Strongs
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
soo
Language:
Greek
Definition:
thou; thou; the personal pronoun of the second person singular;

(the)
Strongs:
Word:
τοῦ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Genitive Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC neuter person or thing that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
[that] which
Conjoined:
»018:G4617
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

to sift
Strongs:
Word:
σινιάσαι
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Infinitive
Grammar:
an ACTION that was to happen
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Spellings:
σινιάσαι; σεινιάσαι
Tyndale
Word:
σινιάζω
Transliteration:
siniazō
Gloss:
to sift
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
σινιάω (< σίνιον, a sieve), = σήθω, to sift, winnow: figuratively, Luk.22:31. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σινιάζω
Transliteration:
siniazō
Gloss:
to sift
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
σινι-άζω, (σινίον) ={σήθω}, sift, winnow, [NT+5th c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
σινιάζω
Transliteration:
siniázō
Pronounciation:
sin-ee-ad'-zo
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to riddle (figuratively); sift; from (a sieve);

like
Strongs:
Word:
ὡς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
as
Tyndale
Word:
ὡς
Transliteration:
hōs
Gloss:
as/when
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
ὡς, adverbial form of the relative pron. ὅς, ἥ, ὅ. I. As relat. adv. of manner, as, like as, just as, even as; 1) with a demonstrative, like οὕτως, expressed or understood: οὕτως. ὡς, Mrk.4:26, 1Co.3:15, Eph.5:28, Jas.2:12, al; ὡς. οὕτως, Act.8:32, 1Co.7:17, al; elliptically (sc. οὕτως, οὕτω), with nom, Mat.6:29, al; with accusative, Mat.19:19, Mrk.12:31, al; with prep, Mat.26:55, Mrk.14:48, Luk.22:52, Jhn.7:10, al; with verb, Jhn.15:6, 2Co.3:1, Eph.2:3, 1Th.5:6, al; with ptcp. (the ptcp. however not having the special force wh. it has in cl; see Bl, §73, 5; 74, 6), Mat.7:29, Mrk.1:22, Heb.13:17, al; freq implying opinion or belief, Rom.9:32; so esp, with genitive absol, 1Co.4:18, 2Co.5:20, 1Pe.4:12, 2Pe.1:3. 2) Before numerals, about, nearly: Mrk.5:13, Jhn.1:40, Act.5:7, al. 3) Before adjectives and adverbs, how: Rom.10:15 11:33, 1Th.2:10; with superl, ὡς τάχιστα, as quickly as possible, Act.17:15. II. As conjunction; 1) temporal, (a) as, when, since: Mrk.9:21 14:72, Luk.1:23, Jhn.2:9, al; (b) while, when, as long as: Luk.12:58, Jhn.12:36, Gal.6:10 (Field, Notes, 191); ὡς ἄν (M, Pr., 167, and see: ἄν), Rom.15:24, 1Co.11:34, Php.2:23. 2) Final, in order that; with inf, in order to (M, Pr., 204n), Luk.9:52, Act.20:24, Heb.7:9. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὡς
Transliteration:
hōs
Gloss:
as/when
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
ὡς:— Summary: A) as adverb of Manner. A.Aa) ὧς and ὥς (with accent), so, thus. A.Ab) ὡς (without accent) of the Relat. pronoun ὅς, as. A.Ac) ὡς Relat. and Interrog, how. A.Ad) ὡς temporal, when. A.Ae) ὡς Local, where, B ) ὡς, as CONJUNCTION. C,D) various usages. adverb of Manner: A.Aa) ὥς, Demonstr, ={οὕτως}, so, thus, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in Ionic dialect Prose, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὥς simply ={οὕτως}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.2) καὶ ὧς even so, nevertheless, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐδ᾽ ὧς not even so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] are used in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κἂν ὧς, εἴπερ μέλει σοι, ἀπόστειλόν μοί τινα [Refs 4th c.AD+]; δουλεύων καθὼς καὶ ὧς [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; Thess. καὶ οὗς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; for this phrase the accentuation ὧς[Refs 2nd c.AD+] A.3) in Comparisons, ὥς, ὡς, so. as, etc; and reversely ὡς, ὣς, as. so, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὥς τε. ὣς, as. thus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὥσπερ, ὣς δὲ. (in apodosi) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.4) thus, for instance, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥς should be accented in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.4.Ab) ὡς, Relat, as, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; properly relative to a demonstrative adverb, which is frequently omitted, κινήθη δ᾽ ἀγορὴ ὡς κύματα μακρὰ θαλάσσης, i. e. οὕτως, ὡς, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; compare ὥτε. Usage: A.I) in similes, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; longer similes are commonly introduced by ὡς ὅτε, ὡς δ᾽ ὅτε, ἤριπε δ᾽, ὡς ὅτε πύργος [ἤριπε] [Refs]; so later, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is rare in short similes, [Refs 8th c.BC+] is followed by indicative present, [Refs 8th c.BC+]aorist, [Refs]; also by subjunctive present or aorist, [Refs] (sometimes ὡς δ᾽ ὅτ᾽ ἄν, [Refs]; compare ὥστε A:—the Verb is sometimes omitted with ὡς, but may be supplied from the context, ἐνδούπησε πεσοῦσ᾽, ὡς εἰναλίη κήξ (i.e. πίπτει) [Refs 8th c.BC+] follows the noun to which it refers, it takes the accent; so in Comedy texts, Ἀριστόδημος ὥς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see infr. H. A.I.2) like as, just as, ὡς οὗτος κατὰ τέκν᾽ ἔφαγε, ὣς ἡμεῖς κτλ. [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.I.3) sometimes in the sense as much as or according as, ἑλὼν κρέας ὥς (i. e. ὅσον) οἱ χεῖρες ἐχάνδανον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὦκα δὲ μητρὶ ἔννεπον ὡς (i. e. ὅσα) εἶδόν τε καὶ ἔκλυον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag, σοὶ θεοὶ πόροιεν ὡς ἐγὼ θέλω [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in Prose, ὡς δύναται as much as he can, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς μή ={ὅσον μή, νέμεν ὅτι ἃν} (={ἂν}) βόλητοι ὡς μὴ ἰν τοῖ περιχώροι [Refs 4th c.BC+]; cf. Ab. 11.2 below A.I.4) sometimes after comparative, compared with, hence than, μᾶλλον πρέπει οὕτως ὡς. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδενὸς μᾶλλον φροντίζειν ὡς. [Refs 2nd c.BC+] is uncertain in [Refs 4th c.BC+], and [ἢ] should perhaps be inserted in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare ὥσπερ IV. A.II) with Adverbial clauses: A.II.1) parenthetically, in qualifying clauses, ὡς ἔοικε, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in these cases γε or γοῦν is frequently added, ὡς γοῦν ὁ λόγος σημαίνει as at any rate the argument shows, [Refs]; in some phrases with infinitive, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] τὸ σφέτερον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς γὰρ. ἤκουσά τινος, ὅτι. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἁνὴρ ὅδ᾽ ὡς ἔοικεν οὐ νεμεῖν (for οὐ νεμεῖ, ὡς ἔοικε), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.2) in elliptical phrases, so far as. (compare supr. Ab.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀπ᾽ ὀμμάτων (i.e. εἰκάσαι) to judge by eyesight, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: especially in such phrases as οὐκέτι πολλὸν χωρίον, ὡς εἶναι Αἰγύπτου [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδὲ ἀδύνατος, ὡς Αακεδαιμόνιος for a Lacedaemonian, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φρονεῖ. ὡς γυνὴ μέγα for a woman, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πιστός, ὡς νομεύς, ἀνήρ [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—for ὡς εἰπεῖν and the like, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.3) ὡς attached to the object of the Verb, as, ἑωυτὸν ὡς ἐχθρὸν λυπέει [Refs 5th c.BC+].— For the similar usage of ὡς with Participles and Prepositions, see below with A.III) with Adverbs: A.III.a) with the Posit, ὡς ἀληθῶς truly, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἑτέρως in the other way, [Refs 4th c.BC+] (adverb of ὁ ἕτερο; see at {ἕτερος} see 2) (see. below [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς ἠπίως, ὡς ἐτητύμως, [LXX+5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐναλλάξ [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in ὣς αὔτως (see. ὡσαύτως) we have the adverb of ὁ αὐτός, but the ὥς retains its demonstrative force, as does ὁ in Homer; ὡς ἀληθῶς, ὡς ὁμοίως, and ὡς παντελῶς may be modelled on ὣς αὔτως, with which they are nearly synonymous; so also ὡς ἑτέρως and ὡς ἐναλλάξ, which are contrasted with it. A.III.b) with adverbs expressing anything extraordinary, θαυμαστῶς or θαυμασίως ὡς, ὑπερφυῶς ὡς, (see entry); ὡς is sometimes separated by several words from its adverb, as θαυμαστῶς μοι εἶπες ὡς παρα᾽ δόξαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.c) with the superlative, as much as can be, ὡς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+] as easily as possible, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὠς τάχιστα as quickly as possible, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀνυστὸν κάλλιστα Diog.[Refs 2nd c.AD+] are sometimes found together, where one is superfluous, ὡς ὅτι μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see infr. G. A.III.d) with comparative, ὡς θᾶσσον [Refs 2nd c.BC+] A.III.e) in the phrases ὡς τὸ πολύ, ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πολύ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πλεῖον for the more part, commonly, ὡς ἐπὶ πλεῖστον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πλῆθος, ὡς πλήθει, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) with adjectives, A.III.2.a) Posit, ὑπερφυεῖ τινι. ὡς μεγάλῃ βλάβῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2.b) with superlative, ὡς ἄριστοι τὰς φύσεις [Refs] A.III.2.c) separated from the adjective by a preposition, ὡς ἐς ἐλάχιστον [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2.Ac) Relat. and Interrog, how, μερμήριζε. ὡς Ἀχιλῆα τιμήσειε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς πέπραται how, i. e. at what price the goods have been sold, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; so οὐκ ἔσθ᾽ ὡς. (for the more usually ὅπως) nowise can it be that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἔσθ᾽ ὡς οὐ, [Refs]; οἶσθ᾽ ὡς πόησο; by a mixture of constructions for ὡς χρὴ ποιῆσαι or ὡς ποιήσεις, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἶσθ᾽ ὡς μετεύξει is falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; similarly, οἶσθα. ὡς νῦν μὴ σφαλῇς [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) ὡς ἂν ποήσῃς however (in whatever way) thou mayest act, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2.Ad) Temporal, when, with past tenses of the indicative, ἐνῶρτο γέλως, ὡς ἴδον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with optative, to express a repeated action, whenever, ὡς. ἐς τὴν Μιλησίην ἀπίκοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+]: rarely with subjunctive, to denote what happens under certain conditions, τῶν δὲ ὡς ἕκαστός οἱ μειχθῇ, διδοῖ δῶρον [Refs]; later, ὡς ἄν with subjunctive, when, [NT+3rd c.BC+]; ὡς ἂν τάχιστα λάβῃς τὴν ἐπιστολήν as soon as. [LXX+3rd c.BC+]: in indirect speech with infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+] as soon as ever, [Refs 5th c.BC+] stand together, [Refs 4th c.BC+]: but this usage must be distinguished from signf. Ab.111.1c: followed by demonstrative, ὡς εἶδ᾽, ὣς ἀνεπᾶλτο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; the second ὣς is repeated, ἁ δ᾽ Ἀταλάντα ὡς ἴδεν, ὣς ἐμάνη, ὣς ἐς βαθὺν ἅλατ᾽ ἔρωτα [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.III.2) ὡς appears to be falsa lectio for{ἕως} in ὡς ἂν αὑτὸς ἥλιος. αἴρῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but in later Gr. ={ἕως}, while, ὡς τὸ φῶς ἔχετε [NT]; also until, τίθεται ἐπὶ ἀνθράκων ὡς ἀναξηρανθῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔα ἀφρίζειν τὴν πίσσαν ὡς οὗ ἐκλείπῃ [Refs];compare [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.III.2.Ae) Local, where, in dialects, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] B) ὡς as CONJUNCTION: B.I) with Substantive clauses, to express a fact, ={ὅτι}, that. B.II) with Final clauses, to express an end or purpose, ={ἵνα, ὅπως}, so that, in order that. B.III) Consecutive, ={ὥστε}, so that. B.IV) Causal, since, because. B.I) with Substantive Clauses, with verbs of learning, saying, etc, that, expressing a fact, γνωτὸν, ὡς ἤδη Τρώεσσιν ὀλέθρου πείρατ᾽ ἐφῆπται [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with Verbs of fear or anxiety, with future indicative, μηκέτ᾽ ἐκφοβοῦ, μητρῷον ὥς σε λῆμ᾽ ἀτιμάσει ποτέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὴ φοβοῦ ὡς ἀπορήσεις [Refs 4th c.BC+]; a sentence beginning with ὡς is sometimes, when interrupted, resumed by ὅτι, and vice versa, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so ὡς with a finite Verb passes into the accusative and infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is followed by indicative, after historic tenses by optative (sometimes by indicative, both constructions in ὑπίσχοντο. ἀμυνέειν, φράζοντες ὡς οὔ σφι περιοπτέη ἐστὶ ἡ Ἑλλὰς ἀπολλυμένη. ἀλλὰ τιμωρητέον εἴη [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes with optative after a primary tense, κατάπτονται. λέγοντες ὡς Ἀρίστων. οὐ φήσειε [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) with Verbs of feeling, χαίρει δέ μοι ἦτορ, ὥς μευ ἀεὶ μέμνησαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.II) with Final Clauses, that, in order that; in this sense ὡς and ὡς ἄν, Epic dialect ὥς κεν, are used with the subjunctive after primary tenses of the indicative, and with the optative after the past tenses, βουλὴν ὑποθησόμεθ᾽, ὡς μὴ πάντες ὄλωνται [Refs 8th c.BC+]future indicative, ὡς μὴ ὦν αὐτοὶ τε ἀπολέεσθε (conjecture Cobet for ἀπόλεσθε) κἀμὲ τρώσετε, ἐς ἄλλον τινὰ δῆμον ἀποίχεσθε [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.2) ὡς is also used with past tenses of the indicative to express a purpose which has not been or cannot be fulfilled, τί μ᾽ οὐκ ἔκτεινας, ὡς ἔδειξα μήποτε; so that I never should, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.3) ὡς with infinitive, to limit an assertion, ὡς μὲν ἐμοὶ δοκέειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν,compare ἔπος [Refs]; ὡς συντόμως, or ὡς συνελόντι εἰπεῖν to speak shortly, to be brief, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς εἰκάσαι to make a guess, i.e. probably, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) to express Consequence, like{ὥστε}, so that, frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] in breadth such that two triremes could sail abreast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Trag. and Prose, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also, like{ὥστε}, with Indic, οὕτω κλεινὴ ἐγένετο, ὡς. ἐξέμαθον [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.2) ἢ ὡς after a comparative, μάσσον᾽ ἢ ὡς ἰδέμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] too few to, [Refs 5th c.BC+] too old to. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.3) ὡς is sometimes omitted where the antecedent demonstrative is expressed, οὕτω ἰσχυραί, μόγις ἂν διαρρήξειας so strong, you could hardly break them, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) Causal, inasmuch as, since, τί ποτε λέγεις, ὦ τέκνο; ὡς οὐ μανθάνω [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV.2) on the ground that, with future indicative, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) ὡς before C.I) Participles; C.II) Prepositions; and C.III) ὡς itself as a Preposition. C.IV) with Participles in the case of the Subject, to mark the reason or motive of the action, as if, as, ὡς οὐκ ἀΐοντι ἐοικώς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀγανακτοῦσιν ὡς μεγάλων τινῶν ἀπεστερημένοι (i. e. ἡγούμενοι μεγάλων τινῶν ἀπεστερῆσθαι), [Refs 5th c.BC+]: most frequently with participle future, διαβαίνει, ὡς ἀμήσων τὸν σῖτον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with verbs of knowing, ἐπιστάσθω Κροῖσος ὡς ὕστερον. ἁλοὺς τῆς πεπρωμένης [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς μὴ 'μπολήσων ἴσθι. [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.IV.2) with Participles in oblique cases, λέγουσιν ἡμᾶς ὡς ὀλωλότας they speak of us as dead, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ὀλιγωρίᾳ ἐποιοῦντο, ὡς, ὅταν ἐξέλθωσιν, ἢ οὐχ ὑπομενοῦντας σφᾶς ἢ ῥᾳδίως ληψόμενοι βίᾳ made light of the matter, in the belief that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]—Both constructions in one sentence, τοὺς κόσμους εἴασε χαίρειν ὡς ἀλλοτρίους τε ὄντας καὶ πλέον θάτερον ἡγησάμενος ἀπεργάζεσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.IV.3) with Parts. put absolutely in genitive, νῦν δέ, ὡς οὕτω ἐχόντων, στρατιὴν ἐκπέμπετε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐρώτα ὅτι βούλει, ὡς τἀληθῆ ἐροῦντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so also in accusative, μισθὸν αἰτοῦσιν, ὡς οὐχὶ αὐτοῖσιν ὠφελίαν ἐσομένην ἐκ τοῦ ἄρχειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with both cases in one sentence, ὡς καὶ τῶν Ἀθηναίων προσδοκίμων ὄντων ἄλλῃ στρατιᾷ καὶ. διαπεπολεμησόμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II) ὡς before Preps, ἀνήγοντο ὡς ἐπὶ ναυμαχίαν (variant{-ίᾳ}) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κατέλαβε τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ὡς ἐπὶ τυραννίδι, expressing the purpose, [Refs 5th c.BC+] marks an intention; not so in the following: ἀπαγγέλλετε τῇ μητρὶ [χαίρειν] ὡς παρ᾽ ἐμοῦ [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II.b) later, in geographical expressions, of direction, προϊών, ὡς ἐπὶ τὸν Πηνειόν [Refs 1st c.BC+]; ὡς εἰς Φηραίαν (to be read Ἡραίαν) ἰόντων [Refs] C.III) ὡς as a preposition, properly in cases where the object is a person, not a place: once in [Refs 8th c.BC+] (variant{ἐς τὸν ὁμοῖον},compare αἶνος Ὁμηρικός, αἰὲν ὁμοῖον ὡς θεός. ἐς τὸν ὁμοῖον ἄγει [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ἔρχεται. ἕκαστον τὸ ὅμοιον ὡς τὸ ὅ, τὸ πυκνὸν ὡς τὸ πυκνόν κτλ. (with variant{ἐς}) [Refs 5th c.BC+] as. so, in [Refs 8th c.BC+].έ: frequently in Attic dialect, ὡς Ἆγιν ἐπρεσβεύσαντο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ναῦς ἐς τὸν Ἑλλήσποντον ὡς Φαρνάβαζον ἀποπέμπειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; the examples of ὡς with names of places are corrupt, e.g. ὡς τὴν Μίλητον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς Ἄβυδον one Ms. in [Refs 5th c.BC+] is equivalent to ὡς ἐμὲ τὸν ἀδελφό; in [Refs] D) ὡς in independent sentences: D.I) as an exclamation, how, mostly with adverbs and adjectives, ὡς ἄνοον κραδίην ἔχες how silly a heart hadst thou! [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀγαθὸν καὶ παῖδα λιπέσθαι how good is it, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀστεῖος ὁ ἄνθρωπος how charming he is! [LXX+5th c.BC+]; in indirect clauses, ἐθαύμασα τοῦτο, ὡς ἡδέως. ἀπεδέξατο marvelled at seeing how, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.2) with Verbs, ὥς μοι δέχεται κακὸν ἐκ κακοῦ αἰεί how constantly, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς οὐκ ἔστι χάρις μετόπισθ᾽ εὐεργέων how little thanks remain! [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς ὄχλος νιν. ἀμφέπει see how, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ὑπερδέδοικά σου how greatly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II) to mark a wish, oh that! with optative alone, ὡς ἔρις. ἀπόλοιτο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also ὡς ἄν or κε with optative, ὡς ἂν ἔπειτ᾽ ἀπὸ σεῖο οὐκ ἐθέλοιμι λείπεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.II.2) joined with other words of wishing, ὡς ὤφελες αὐτόθ᾽ ὀλέσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] E) ὡς with numerals marks that they are to be taken only as a round number, as it were, about, nearly, σὺν ἀνθρώποις ὡς εἴκοσι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὡς πέντε μάλιστά κῃ about five (see. μάλα [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—also with words compounded with numerals, δέπας. ὡς τριλάγυνον [Refs 7th c.BC+]; παῖς ὡς ἑπτέτης of some seven years, [Refs 5th c.BC+] F) ὡς in some elliptical (or apparently elliptical) phrases: F.1) ὡς τί δὴ τόδε (i.e. γένηται); to what end? [Refs 5th c.BC+] F.2) know that (i.e. ἴσθι), ὡς ἔστιν ἀνδρὸς τοῦδε τἄργα ταῦτά σοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Comedy texts, ὡς ἔστ᾽ ἐν ἡμῖν τῆς πόλεως τὰ πράγματα [Refs 5th c.BC+] F.3) ὡς ἕκαστος, ἕκαστοι, each severally (whether in respect of time, place, or other difference), ξυνελέγοντο. Κορίνθιοι δισχίιοι ὁπλῖται, οἱ δ᾽ ἄλλοι ὡς ἕκαστοι, Φλειάσιοι δὲ πανστρατιᾷ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρώτη τε αὕτη πόλις ξυμμαχὶς παρὰ τὸ καθεστηκὸς ἐδουλώθη, ἔπειτα δὲ καὶ τῶν ἄλλων ὡς ἑκάστη [ξυνέβη] (ξ. secl. Krüger: ἀπὸ κοινοῦ ἐδουλώθη [Refs]; χρησμολόγοι τε ᾖδον χρησμοὺς παντοίους, ὧν ἀκροᾶσθαι ὡς ἕκαστος ὥρμητο, i. e. different persons ran to listen to different prophecies, [Refs]; τὰς ἄλλας ὡς ἑκάστην ποι ἐκπεπτωκυῖαν ἀναδησάμενοι ἐκόμιζον ἐς τὴν πόλιν they made fast to the rest wherever each (ship) had been run ashore, [Refs]; οἱ δ᾽ οὖν ὡς ἕκαστοι Ἕλληνες κατὰ πόλεις τε ὅσοι ἀλλήλων ξυνίεσαν καὶ ξύμπαντες ὕστερον κληθέντες οὐδὲν πρὸ τῶν Τρωικῶν. ἁθρόοι ἔπραξαν the various peoples that were later called by the common name of Greeks, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἑκάστην (one by one) αἱρέοντες (i.e. τὰς νήσους) οἱ βάρβαροι ἐσαγήνευον τοὺς ἀνθρώπους [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; rarely with a Verb, ὡς ἕκαστος ἀπικνέοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] follows ἕκαστος, ἑκάστῳ ὡς ὁ Θεὸς ἐμέρισεν μέτρον πίστεως [NT]:—for the etymology see infr. H; also ὡς ἑκάτεροι [Refs 5th c.BC+] G) ὡς pleonastic in ὡς ὅτι [NT+8th c.BC+] H) Etymology: this word is in origin five distinct words: [Refs]as' is the adverb from the Relat. ὅς (I.-[Refs 5th c.BC+] stem yo-); with ὡς βέλτιστος cf. Sanskrit yācchrē[snull][tnull]á[hudot] 'the best possible': (2) ὧς 'thus' is the adverb of a Demonstr. stem so- found in Sanskrit sa, Gr. ὁ, Latin sō-c ([Refs]; = ita, cf. Umbr. esoc); (3) ὡς postpositive (ὄρνιθες ὥς, etc.) constantly makes a preceding short closed syllable long in [Refs 8th c.BC+], and must therefore have been ϝω; it may perhaps be related to Sanskrit vā, a form of va, iva (= [Refs]like), Latin ve, Gr. ἦ[ϝ] ; [Refs]to' is of doubtful origin (perhaps from *ὠς, cognate with Latin ōs 'face', Sanskrit ās: ὤς τινα ἐλθεῖν like{τί δέ δε φρένας ἵκετο πένθος};); (5) ὡς F. 3 is probably ϝως, adverb of ϝός the reflexive adjective, and means literal in his (their) own way (or place); it is idiomatically placed before ἕκαστος (ἑκάτερος),compare ϝὸν ϝεκάτερος [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ὡς
Transliteration:
hōs
Pronounciation:
hoce
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adverb
Definition:
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows); about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed; probably adverb of comparative from g3739 (ὅς);

(the)
Strongs:
Word:
τὸν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
the
Conjoined:
»024:G4621
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

wheat;
Strongs:
Word:
σῖτον
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
grain
Tyndale
Word:
σῖτος
Transliteration:
sitos
Gloss:
grain
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male/Neuter
Definition:
σῖτος, -ου, ὁ [in LXX chiefly for דָּגָן;] wheat, corn: Mat.3:12 13:25, 29-30 Mrk.4:28, Luk.3:17 12:18 16:7 22:32, Jhn.12:24, Act.27:38, 1Co.15:37, Rev.6:6 18:13. σιτίοι, -ου, τό (dimin. of σῖτος), [in LXX: Pro.30:22 (לֶחֶם)*;] 1) corn, grain: Act.7:12 (but see 131, § 9, 1). 2) Mostly in pl, σιτία, bread, food, provisions (LXX, l.with, Hdt, al.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σῖτος
Transliteration:
sitos
Gloss:
grain
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male/Neuter
Definition:
σῖτος, ὁ, irregular plural σῖτα, τά, [Refs 6th c.BC+]:— grain, comprehending both wheat (πυρός) and barley (κριθή), ἐν [Ἰθάκῃ] σ. ἀθέσφατος ἐν δέ τε οἶνος γίγνεται [Refs 8th c.BC+]; περὶ σίτου ἐκβολήν about the shooting of the corn into ear, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦ σ. ἀκμάζοντος at its ripening, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; σ. ἀληλεσμένος or -εμένος ground corn, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; σίτου εἰσαγωγή, ἐξαγωγή, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; comprehending πυρός, κριθή, ὄλυρα, and φακός, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; περὶ τοῦ σ. καὶ τοῦ σησάμου [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ὁ σ. καὶ τὰ λάχανα as examples of πόα, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 2) food made from grain, bread, opposed to flesh-meat, σ. καὶ κρέα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σῖτον ἔδοντες, a general epithet of men as opposed to to beasts, ὅσσοι νῦν βροτοί εἰσιν ἐπὶ χθονὶ σ. ἔδ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of savages, who eat flesh only, οὐδέ τι σῖτον ἤσθιον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of civilized men, σῖτον καὶ σπείρουσι καὶ σιτέονται [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κάρδαμον ἔχειν ἐπὶ τῷ σ. [Refs]; πίνειν ὕδωρ ἐπὶ τῷ σ[Refs 1st c.AD+] 3) in a wider sense, food, as opposed to to drink, σ. ἠδὲ ποτής [Refs 8th c.BC+]; even of porridge (κυκεών),[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εὐνὴ καὶ σ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; provisions, σῖτα ἀναιρέεσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παρέχειν μέχρι τριάκοντα ἡμερῶν σ. Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4) rarely of beasts, fodder, [Refs 8th c.BC+]—In the general sense of food, Prose writers prefer the dim. form σιτία, τά. II) in Attic dialect Law, allowance of grain made to widows and orphans. σῖτον διδόναι, ἀποδιδόναι, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.2) δίκην σίτου δικάσασθαι, bring an action under the Athen. Corn-law against regraters and monopolists, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.3) allowance made to the Ἱππεῖς, [Refs] II.4) public distribution of corn in Rome, Latin frumentatio, τὸν ἐπὶ τοῦ σίτου ὄντα ἐν Ῥώμῃ [Refs 2nd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
σῖτος
Transliteration:
sîtos
Pronounciation:
see'-tah
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
grain, especially wheat; corn, wheat; of uncertain derivation;