Lucas 20:43

43 Disde que bucharele á tires daschmanuces bajines de tires pindrés.
until
Strongs:
Word:
ἕως
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἕως
Transliteration:
heōs
Gloss:
until
Morphhology:
Greek, Preposition
Definition:
ἕως, relative particle (Lat. donee, usque), expressing the terminus ad quem (cf. Burton, §321ff.). I. As conjunction; 1) till, until; (a) of a fact in past time, with indic: Mat.2:9, al. (Wis.10:14, al.); (b) ἕως ἄν, with subjc. aor: Mat.2:13 5:18, Mrk.6:10, al; without ἄν (M. Pr., 168f; Lft, Notes, 115), Mrk.14:32 (Burton, §325), Luk.12:59, 2Th.2:7, al; (with) with indic, pres. (Burton, §328; BL, §65, 10): Mrk.6:45, Jhn.21:22, 23 1Ti.4:13. 2) C. indic, as long as, while (Burton, §327): Jhn.9:4 (Plat, Phaedo, 89c). II. As an adverb (chiefly in late writers). 1) Of time, until, unto; (a) as prep. with genitive (BL, §40, 6; M, Pr., 99): τ. ἡμέρας, Mat.26:29, Luk.1:80, Rom.11:8, al; ὥρας, Mat.27:45, al; τέλους, 1Co.1:8, 2Co.1:13; τ. νῦν, Mat.24:21, Mrk.13:19 (1Ma.2:33); ἐτῶν ὀγ. (Field, Notes, 49f.), Luk.2:37; τ. ἐλθεῖν, Act.8:40; before names and events, Mat.1:17 2:15, Luk.11:51, Jas.5:7, al; (b) before οὗ, ὅτου, with the force of a conjc. (Burton, §330; M, Pr., 91); (α) ἕ. οὗ (Hdt, ii, 143; Plut, al.): with indic, Mat.1:25 (WH br, οὗ) 13:33, al; with subjc. aor, Mat.14:22, al; (β) ἔ. ὅτου: with subjc, Luk.13:8; with indic, Mat.5:25 (until), Jhn.9:18; (with) with adv. (ἔ. ὀψέ, Thuc, iii, 108): ἄρτι, Mat.11:12, Jhn.2:10, 1Co.4:13, al; πότε (M, Pr., 107), Mat.17:17, Mrk.9:19, Jhn.10:24, al. 2) Of place, as far as, even to, unto (Arist, al.); (a) as prep. with genitive (see supr.): Mt 1123, Lk 1015, al; (b) with adv. (BL, §40, 6): ἄνω, Jhn.2:7; ἔσω, Mrk.14:54; κάτω, Mat.27:51, Mrk.15:38; ὧδε, Luk.23:5; (with) with prep.: ἔξω, Act.21:5; πρός, Luk.24:50 (Field, Notes, 83). 3) Of quantity, measure, etc: Mat.18:21, Mrk.6:23, Luk.22:51, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἕως
Transliteration:
heōs
Gloss:
until
Morphhology:
Greek, Preposition
Definition:
ἕως, B) Epic dialect εἵως, ἧος (see. entry near the end), Doric dialect ἇς, Aeolic dialect ἆς (which see), Boeotian dialect ἇς [Refs], and ἅως [Refs] Relat. Particle, expressing the point of Time up to which an action goes, with reference to the end of the action, until, till; or to its continuance, while: B.I) until, till, B.I.1) with Ind, of a fact in past time, θῦνε διὰ προμάχων, ἧος φίλον ὤλεσε θυμόν [Refs 8th c.BC+]imperfect with ἄν in apodosi, of an unaccomplished action, ἡδέως ἂν Καλλικλεῖ διελεγόμην, ἕ. ἀπέδωκα I would have gone on conversing till I had, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) ἕ. ἄν or κε with Subj. (mostly of aorist), of an event at an uncertain future time, μαχήσομαι. ἧός κε τέλος πολέμοιο κιχείω till I find, [Refs 8th c.BC+] is sometimes omitted in Trag, ἕ. μάθῃς [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so frequently in later Gr, [NT+2nd c.BC+] B.I.3) ἕ. with Opt. (mostly of aorist), relating to an event future in relation to past time, ὦρσε. Βορέην, ἧος ὃ Φαιήκεσσι. μιγείη caused it to blow, till he should reach, [Refs 8th c.BC+] or κε is added to the Opt. (not to ἕως), if the event is represented as conditional, ἕ. κ᾽ ἀπὸ πάντα δοθείη till (if possible) all things should be given back, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.3.b) in indirect speech, ἔδωκεν. ἕ. ἀνὴρ εἶναι δοκιμασθείην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.3.c) by assimilation to an optative with ἄν, [λόγον] ἂν διδοίης ἕ. ἔλθοις [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.4) with subjunctive or optative, expressing purpose, in order that, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σπούδασον ἕως οὗ ἀγοράσῃ κτλ. [Refs 2nd c.AD+] B.I.5) with Inf. in indirect speech, ἐντειλάμενος διεκπλέειν ἕ. ἀπικνέεσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: otherwise only in later Gr, ἕ. ἐλθεῖν ἐς. [LXX+1st c.BC+] B.I.6) with adverbs of Time and Place, ἕ. ὅτε till the time when, with indicative, variant for{ἔστε} in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἕ. οὗ, falsa lectio for{ἐς οὗ}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: frequently in later Gr, Gem.[same place], [NT]; ἕ. πότ; how long[LXX+NT]; ἕ. ὀψέ till late, falsa lectio for{ἐς ὀψέ}, [NT+5th c.BC+]; ἕ. ὧδε as far as this place, [NT] B.I.6.b) with Preps, of Time, ἕ. πρὸς καλὸν ἑῷον ἀστέρα[Refs]; of Place, ἕ. εἰς τὸν χάρακα [NT+2nd c.BC+] B.II) as preposition, B.II.1) of Time, with genitive, until, ἕως τοῦ ἀποτεῖσαι until he has made payment, Legal cited in [LXX+4th c.BC+]; ἕ. τινός for a time, [NT+1st c.BC+] B.II.1.b) of Place, ἕ. τοῦ γενέσθαι. up to the point where. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; as far as, ἕ. Σάρδεων [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ἕ. τοῦ Ἀρσινοΐτου νομοῦ [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ἕ. Φοινίκης [LXX+NT] B.II.1.c) of Number or Degree, ἕ. τριῶν πλοίων Docum. cited in [LXX+4th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἔστιν ἕ. ἑνός[LXX+2nd c.BC+]; ἐᾶτε ἕ. τούτου [NT+3rd c.BC+]; ἕ. μέθης [Refs 1st c.AD+] B.II.2) rarely with accusative, ἕ. πρωΐ [LXX+1st c.AD+]; ἕ. τὸ βωμῷ down to the word “βωμῷ”, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) while, so long as, with indicative, ἧος ἐνὶ Τροίῃ πολεμίζομεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἕ. δ᾽ ἔτ᾽ ἔμφρων εἰμί [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἕ. ἔτι ἐλπὶς [ἦν] [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by τόφρα, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by δέ alone,[Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.b) ἕ. ἄν c.subjunctive, when the whole action is future, οὔ μοι. ἐλπίς, ἕ. ἂν αἴθῃ πῦρ [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.c) ἕως with optative in a Conditional relative clause, φήσομεν μηδὲν ἂν μεῖζον μηδὲ ἔλαττον γενέσθαι ἕ. ἴσον εἴη αὐτὸ ἐαυτῷ [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) in [Refs 8th c.BC+], for a time, ἧος μὲν. ὄρνυον· αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; all that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+], as iambus, only once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; as a monosyllable, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; when the first syllable is to be long codices [Refs 8th c.BC+], except ειος variant [Refs 8th c.BC+]; comparison of Doric dialect ἇς (from *ἇος) with Attic dialect-Ionic dialect ἕως points to early Ionic dialect *ἧος (cf. Sanskrit yāvat 'as great as, as long as, until') and this should probably be restored in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; compare τέως.)
Strongs
Word:
ἕως
Transliteration:
héōs
Pronounciation:
heh'-oce
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
a conjunction, preposition and adverb of continuance, until (of time and place); even (until, unto), (as) far (as), how long, (un-)til(-l), (hither-, un-, up) to, while(-s); of uncertain affinity;

when
Strongs:
Word:
ἂν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Particle or Disjunctive Particle
Grammar:
introducing an alternative
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
if
Tyndale
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek, Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, conditional particle, which cannot usually be separately translated in English, its force depending on the constructions which contain it (see further, LS, see word; WM, §xlii; M, Pr., 165 ff; MM, VGT, see word). 1) In apodosis, (i) with indic, impf. or aor, expressing what would be or would have been if (εἰ with impf, aor. or plpf.) some condition were or had been fulfilled: Luk.7:39 17:6, Jhn.5:46, Gal.1:10, Mat.12:7 24:43, 1Co.2:8, Act.18:14, 1Jn.2:19, al. The protasis is sometimes understood (as also in cl.): Mat.25:27, Luk.19:23. In hypothetical sentences, expressing unreality, ἄν (as often in late writers, more rarely in cl.) is omitted: Jhn.8:39 15:24 19:11, Rom.7:7, Gal.4:15; (ii) with opt, inf, ptcp. (cl; see LS, see word; M, Int., §275; M, Pr., 167:4). 2) In combination with conditional, relative, temporal, and final words; (i) as in cl, with subj, (a) in protasis with εἰ, in Attic contr. ἐάν, which see; (b) in conditional, relative, and temporal clauses (coalescing with ὅτε, ἐπεί, etc; see: ὅταν, ἐπάν, etc.), ever, soever; (α) with pres, ἡνίκα, 2Co.3:15; ὃς ἄν, Rom.9:15 (LXX) 16:2, al; ὅσοι ἄν, Luk.9:5; ὡς ἄν, Rom.15:24 (M, Pr., 167); (β) with aor, ὃς ἄν, Mat.5:21, 22, 31; ἕως ἄν, until, Mat.2:13, Mrk.6:10, al; ὡς ἄν, as soon as (M, Pr., 167), 1Co.11:34, Php.2:23. On the freq. use of ἐάν for ἄν with the foregoing words, see: ἐάν; (ii) in late Gk, when some actual fact is spoken of, with indic: ὅταν (which see); ὅπου ἄν, Mrk.6:56 (M, Pr., 168); καθότι ἄν, Act.2:45 4:35; ὡς ἄν, 1Co.12:2. 3) in iterative construction, with impf. and aor. indic. (M, Pr., 167): Act.2:45 4:35, 1Co.12:2. 4) with optative, giving a potential sense to a question or wish: Act.8:31 26:29. 5) Elliptical constructions: εἰ μή τι ἄν (M, Pr., 169), 1Co.7:5; ὡς ἄν, with inf, as it were (op. cit. 167), 2Co.10:9. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek, Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, [ᾰ], Epic dialect, Lyric poetry, Ionic dialect, [Refs 4th c.AD+], Attic dialect; also κεν) Epic dialect, Aeolic dialect, Thess, κᾱ Doric dialect, Boeotian dialect, El; the two combined in Epic dialect (below [Refs 4th c.BC+], εἰκ ἄν[Refs 4th c.BC+]:—modal Particle used with Verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] κε is four times as common as ἄν, in Lyric poetry about equally common. No clear distinction can be traced, but κε as an enclitic is somewhat less emphatic; ἄν is preferred by [Refs 8th c.BC+] in negative clauses, κε (ν) with the relative. A) In Simple Sentences, and in the Apodosis of Compound Sentences; here ἄν belongs to the Verb, and denotes that the assertion made by the Verb is dependent on a condition, expressed or implied: thus ἦλθεν he came, ἦλθεν ἄν he would have come (under conditions, which may or may not be defined), and so he might have come; ἔλθοι may he come, ἔλθοι ἄν he would come (under certain conditions), and so he might come. A.I) WITH INDICATIVE: A.I.1) with historical tenses, generally imperfect and aorist, less frequently pluperfect, never perfect, see below, A.I.1.a) most frequently in apodosis of conditional sentences, with protasis implying nonfulfilment of a past or present condition, and apodosis expressing what would be or would have been the case if the condition were or had been fulfilled. The imperfect with ἄν refers to continued action, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in past time, except perhaps καί κε θάμ᾽ ἐνθάδ᾽ ἐόντες ἐμισγόμεθ᾽[Refs 8th c.BC+]; later also in present time, first in [Refs 6th c.BC+]; πολὺ ἂν θαυμαστότερον ἦν, εἰ ἐτιμῶντο it would be far more strange if they were honoured, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν νήσων ἐκράτει, εἰ μή τι καὶ ναυτικὸν εἶχεν he would not have been master of islands if he had not had also some naval power, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. The aorist strictly refers only to past time, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ τότε ταύτην ἔσχε τὴν γνώμην, οὐδὲν ἂν ὧν νυνὶ πεποίηκεν ἔπραξεν if he had then come to this opinion, he would have accomplished nothing of what he has now done, [Refs 4th c.BC+], but is used idiomatically with Verbs of saying, answering, etc, as we say I should have said, εἰ μὴ πατὴρ ἦσθ᾽, εἶπον ἄν σ᾽ οὐκ εὖ φρονεῖν[Refs 5th c.BC+]pluperfect refers to completed actions, as ὃ εἰ ἀπεκρίνω, ἱκανῶς ἂν ἤδη παρὰ σοῦ τὴν ὁσιότητα ἐμεμαθήκη I should have already learnt,[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.b) the protasis is frequently understood: ὑπό κεν ταλασίφρονά περ δέος εἷλεν fear would have seized even the stout-hearted (had he heard the sound), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸ γὰρ ἔρυμα τῷ στρατοπέδῳ οὐκ ἂν ἐτειχίσαντο they would not have built the wall (if they had not won a battle), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πολλοῦ γὰρ ἂν ἦν ἄξια for (if that were so) they would be worth much, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν ὅ τι ἂν ἐποιεῖτε for there was nothing which you could have done, i. e. would have done (if you had tried), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.I.1.c) with no definite protasis understood, to express what would have been likely to happen, or might have happened in past time: ἢ γάρ μιν ζωόν γε κιχήσεαι, ἤ κεν Ὀρέστης κτεῖνεν ὑποφθάμενος for either you will find him alive, or else Orestes may already have killed him before you, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ θεασάμενος πᾶς ἄν τις ἀνὴρ ἠράσθη δάϊος εἶναι every man who saw this (the 'Seven against Thebes') would have longed to be a warrior, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially with τάχα, which see, ἀλλ᾽ ἦλθε μὲν δὴ τοῦτο τοὔνειδος τάχ᾽ ἂν ὀργῇ βιασθὲν μᾶλλον ἢ γνώμῃ φρενῶν, i. e. it might perhaps have come, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τάχα ἂν δὲ καὶ ἄλλως πως ἐσπλεύσαντες (i.e. διέβησαν) and they might also perhaps have crossed by sea (to Sicily) in some other way, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.d) ἄν is frequently omitted in apodosi with Verbs expressing obligation, propriety, or possibility, as ἔδει, ἐχρῆν, εἰκὸς ἦν, etc, and sometimes for rhetorical effect, εἰ μὴ. ᾖσμεν, φόβον παρέσχεν it had caused (for it would have caused) fear, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2) with future indicative: A.I.2.a) frequently in Epic dialect, usually with κεν, rarely ἄν, [Refs 8th c.BC+] and he will likely be angry to whom-soever I shall come, [Refs]; καί κέ τις ὧδ᾽ ἐρέει and in that case men will say,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Lyric poetry, μαθὼν δέ τις ἂν ἐρεῖ[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2.b) rarely in codices of Attic dialect Prose writers, σαφὲς ἂν καταστήσετε[Refs 5th c.BC+]future infinitive and participle see below A.II) WITH SUBJUNCTIVE, only in Epic dialect, the meaning being the same as with the future indicative [Refs]I will take her myself, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πείθευ, ἐγὼ δέ κέ τοι εἰδέω χάριν obey and if so I will be grateful, [Refs]; also with other persons, giving emphasis to the future, οὐκ ἄν τοι χραίσμῃ κίθαρις[Refs] A.III) WITH OPTATIVE (never future, rarely perfect πῶς ἂν λελήθοι [με]; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.a) in apodosis of conditional sentences, after protasis in optative with εἰ or some other conditional or relative word, expressing a future condition: ἀλλ᾽ εἴ μοί τι πίθοιο, τό κεν πολὺ κέρδιον εἴη[Refs 8th c.BC+] present and aorist optative with κε or ἄν are sometimes used like imperfect and aorist indicative with ἄν in Attic, with either regular indicative or another optative in the protasis: καί νύ κεν ἔνθ᾽ ἀπόλοιτο. εἰ μὴ. νόησε κτλ, i. e. he would have perished, had she not perceived, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ νῦν ἐπὶ ἄλλῳ ἀεθλεύοιμεν, ἦ τ᾽ ἂν ἐγὼ. κλισίηνδε φεροίμην if we were now contending in another's honour, I should now carry, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.b) with protasis in present or future, the optative with ἄν in apodosi takes a simply future sense: φρούριον δ᾽ εἰ ποιήσονται, τῆς μὲν γῆς βλάπτοιεν ἄν τι μέρος they might perhaps damage, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.c) with protasis understood: φεύγωμεν· ἔτι γάρ κεν ἀλύξαιμεν κακὸν ἦμαρ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὔτε ἐσθίουσι πλείω ἢ δύνανται φέρειν· διαρραγεῖεν γὰρ ἄν for (if they should do so) they would burst, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν δ᾽ οὔ κε δύ᾽ ἀνέρε. ἀπ᾽ οὔδεος ὀχλίσσειαν two men could not heave the stone from the ground, i. e. would not, if they should try, [Refs 8th c.BC+] sometimes with reference to past time, Τυδεΐδην οὐκ ἂν γνοίης ποτέροισι μετείη[Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III.d) with no definite protasis implied, in potential sense: ἡδέως δ᾽ ἂν ἐροίμην Λεπτίνην but I would gladly ask Leptines, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; βουλοίμην ἄν I should like, Latin velim (but ἐβουλόμην ἄν I should wish, if it were of any avail, vellem); ποῖ οὖν τραποίμεθ᾽ ἄ; which way then can we turn? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν μεθείμην τοῦ θρόνου I will not give up the throne, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; idiomatically, referring to the past, αὗται δὲ οὐκ ἂν πολλαὶ εἶεν but these would not (on investigation) prove to be many, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴησαν δ᾽ ἂν οὗτοι Κρῆτες these would be (i. e. would have been) Cretans, [Refs 5th c.BC+] i.e. it would not prove to be, etc. (for, it is not, etc.), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.e) in questions, expressing a wish: τίς ἂν θεῶν. δοί;[Refs 5th c.BC+] as a mild command, exhortation, or entreaty, τλαίης κεν Μενελάῳ ἐπιπροέμεν ταχὺν ἰόν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὺ μὲν κομίζοις ἂν σεαυτὸν ᾗ θέλεις you may take yourself off (milder than κόμιζε σεαυτόν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χωροῖς ἂν εἴσω you may go in, [Refs]; φράζοις ἄν, λέγοις ἄν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.f) in a protasis which is also an apodosis: εἴπερ ἄλλῳ τῳ ἀνθρώπων πειθοίμην ἄν, καὶ σοὶ πείθομαι if I would trust any (other) man (if he gave me his word), I trust you, [Refs]; εἰ μὴ ποιήσαιτ᾽ ἂν τοῦτο if you would not do this (if you could), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.g) rarely omitted with optative in apodosis: ῥεῖα θεός γ᾽ ἐθέλων καὶ τηλόθεν ἄνδρα σαώσαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in Trag, θᾶσσον ἢ λέγοι τις[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.h) ἄν with future optative is probably always corrupt (compare [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰδὼς ὅτι οὐδέν᾽ ἂν καταλήψοιτο (οὐδένα Bekk.) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV) WITH infinitive and participle (sometimes adjective equivalent to participle, τῶν δυνατῶν ἂν κρῖναι[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1) present infinitive or participle: A.IV.1.a) representing imperfect indicative, οἴεσθε τὸν πατέρα. οὐκ ἂν φυλάττει; do you think he would not have kept them safe? (οὐκ ἂν ἐφύλαττεν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδυνάτων ἂν ὄντων [ὑμῶν] ἐπιβοηθεῖν when you would have been unable, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1.b) representing present optative, πόλλ᾽ ἂν ἔχων (representing ἔχοιμ᾽ ἄν) ἕτερ᾽ εἰπεῖν παραλείπω[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2) aorist infinitive or participle: A.IV.2.a) representing aorist indicative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγεῖσθ᾽ αὐτὸν κἂν ἐπιδραμεῖ; do you not think he would even have run thither? (καὶ ἐπέδραμεν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἴσμεν ὑμᾶς ἀναγκασθέντας ἄν we know you would have been compelled, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ῥᾳδίως ἂν ἀφεθείς when he might easily have been acquitted, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2.b) representing aorist optative, οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατῆσαι αὐτοὺς τῆς γῆς ἡγοῦμαι I think they would not even be masters of the land (οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατήσειαν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁρῶν ῥᾳδίως ἂν αὐτὸ ληφθέν (ληφθείη ἄν) [Refs]; οὔτε ὄντα οὔτε ἂν γενόμενα, i.e. things which are not and never could happen (ἃ οὔτε ἂν γένοιτο), [Refs] A.IV.3) perfect infinitive or participle representing: A.IV.3.a) pluperfect indicative, πάντα ταῦθ᾽ ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων ἂν ἑαλωκέναι (φήσειεν ἄν) he would say that all these would have been destroyed by the barbarians (ἑαλώκη ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.IV.3.b) perfect optative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγοῦμαι αὐτοὺς δίκην ἀξίαν δεδωκέναι, εἰ. καταψηφίσαισθε I do not believe they would (then) have suffered (δεδωκότες ἂν εἶεν) punishment enough, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.4) future infinitive or participle, never in Epic dialect, and probably always corrupt in Attic dialect, νομίζων μέγιστον ἂν σφᾶς ὠφελήσειν (to be read -ῆσαι) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle is still more exceptional, ὡς ἐμοῦ οὐκ ἂν ποιήσοντος ἄλλα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; both are found in later Gk, νομίσαντες ἂν οἰκήσειν οὕτως ἄριστα[Refs 2nd c.BC+]; with participle, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B) IN DEPENDENT CLAUSE[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I) In the protasis of conditional sentences with εἰ, regularly with the subjunctive. In Attic εἰ ἄν is contracted into ἐάν, ἤν, or ἄν (ᾱ) (which see): [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἢν ἐγγὺς ἔλθῃ θάνατος, οὐδεὶς βούλεται θνῄσκειν if death (ever) come near, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in relative or temporal clauses with a conditional force; here ἄν coalesces with ὅτε, ὁπότε, ἐπεί, ἐπειδή, compare ὅταν, ὁπόταν, ἐπήν or ἐπάν (Ionic dialect ἐπεάν), ἐπειδάν: [Refs 8th c.BC+], ἐπήν, εὖτ᾽ ἄ; see also εἰσόκε (εἰς ὅ κε):—τάων ἥν κ᾽ ἐθέλωμι φίλην ποιήσομ᾽ ἄκοιτιν whomsoever of these I may wish, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὅταν δὴ μὴ σθένω, πεπαύσομαι when I shall have no strength, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐχθρὸς γάρ μοι κεῖνος. ὅς χ᾽ ἕτερον μὲν κεύθῃ ἐνὶ φρεσίν, ἄλλο δὲ εἴπῃ whoever conceals one thing in his mind and speaks another, [Refs 8th c.BC+]subjunctive in both the above constructions [Refs] without ἄ; also Trag. and Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μέχρι and πρίν occasionally take subjunctive without ἄν in prose, e.g. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μέχρι οὗ), [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) in final clauses introduced by relative adverbs, as ὡς, ὅπως (of Manner), ἵνα (of Place), ὄφρα, ἕως, etc. (of Time), frequently in Epic dialect, σαώτερος ὥς κε νέηαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also after ὡς in [Refs 5th c.BC+] indicative is regular in _Attic dialect_); ἵνα final does not take ἄν or κε except ἵνα εἰδότες ἤ κε θάνωμεν ἤ κεν. φύγοιμεν[Refs 8th c.BC+] = where in [Refs 5th c.BC+] = lest, takes ἄν only with optative in apodosis, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) in Epic dialect sometimes with OPTATIVE as with subjunctive (always κε (ν), except εἴ περ ἂν αὐταὶ Μοῦσαι ἀείδοιεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥς κε. δοίη ᾧ κ᾽ ἐθέλοι that he might give her to whomsoever he might please,[Refs 8th c.BC+] belongs to Verb in apodosis, as in ὡς δ᾽ ἂν ἥδιστα ταῦτα φαίνοιτο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) rarely in oratio obliqua, where a relative or temporary word retains an ἄν which it would have with subjunctive in direct form, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—similarly after a preceding optative, οὐκ ἀποκρίναιο ἕως ἂν. σκέψαιο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) rarely with εἰ and INDICATIVE in protasis, only in Epic dialect: B.III.1) with future indicative as with subjunctive: αἴ κεν Ἰλίου πεφιδήσεται[Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.2) with εἰ and a past tense of indicative, once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so Ζεὺς γάρ κ᾽ ἔθηκε νῆσον εἴ κ᾽ ἐβούλετο Oracle texts cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) in later Greek, ἄν with relative words is used with INDICATIVE in all tenses, as ὅπου ἂν εἰσεπορεύετο[NT+4th c.AD+]; ἔνθ᾽ ἂν πέφυκεν ἡ ὁλότης εἶναι[Refs 6th c.AD+]; compare ἐάν, ὅταν. C) with imperfect and more rarely aorist indicative in ITERATIVE construction, to express elliptically a condilion fulfilled whenever an opportumty offered; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] she would (i. e. used to) weep and lament, 3.119; εἶτα πῦρ ἂν οὐ παρῆν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴ τινες ἴδοιεν, ἀνεθάρσησαν ἄν whenever they saw it, on each occasion, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive representing imperfect of this construction, ἀκούω Λακεδαιμονίους τότε ἐμβαλόντας ἂν. ἀναχωρεῖν, i. e. I hear they used to retire (ἀνεχώρουν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D) GENERAL REMARKS: D.I) POSITION OF ἄν. D.I.1) in A, when ἄν does not coalesce with the relative word (as in ἐάν, ὅταν), it follows directly or is separated only by other particles, as μέν, δέ, τε, γάρ, καί, νυ, περ, etc; as εἰ μέν κεν. εἰ δέ κε[Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely by τις, as ὅποι τις ἄν, οἶμαι, προσθῇ[Refs 8th c.BC+] two such Particles may precede κε, as εἴ περ γάρ κεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ γάρ τίς κε, ὃς μὲν γάρ κε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely in Prose, ὅποι μὲν γὰρ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.2) in apodosis, ἄν may stand either next to its Verb (before or after it), or after some other emphatic word, especially an interrogative, a negative (e. g. οὐδ᾽ ἂν εἷς, οὐκ ἂν ἔτι, etc.), or an important Adjective or Adverb; also after a participle which represents the protasis, λέγοντος ἄν τινος πιστεῦσαι οἴεσθ; do you think they would have believed it if any one had told them? (εἴ τις ἔλεγεν, ἐπίστευσαν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D.I.3) ἄν is frequently separated from its infinitive by such Verbs as οἴομαι, δοκέω, φημί, οἶδα, etc, οὐκ ἂν οἴει; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ νῦν ἡδέως ἄν μοι δοκῶ κοινωνῆσαι I think that I should, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μήτε προῄδει μηδεὶς μήτ᾽ ἂν ᾠήθη τήμερον ῥηθῆναι (where ἄν belongs to ῥηθῆναι) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.4) ἄν never begins a sentence, or even a clause after a comma, but may stand first after a parenthetic clause, ἀλλ᾽, ὦ μέλ᾽, ἄν μοι σιτίων διπλῶν ἔδει[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II) REPETITION OF ἄν:—in apodosis ἄν may be used twice or even three times with the same Verb, either to make the condition felt throughout a long sentence, or to emphasize certain words, ὥστ᾽ ἄν, εἰ σθένος λάβοιμι, δηλώσαιμ᾽ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; attached to a parenthetical phrase, ἔδρασ᾽ ἄν, εὖ τοῦτ᾽ ἴσθ᾽ ἄν, εἰ. [Refs] D.II.2) ἄν is coupled with κε (ν) a few times in [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.III) ELLIPSIS OF VERB:—sometimes the Verb to which ἄν belongs must be supplied, in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὐκ ἂν πρὸ τοῦ (i.e. ἔρρεγκον) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἂν δοκεῖ σοι Πρίαμος (i.e. πρᾶξαι), εἰ τάδ᾽ ἤνυσε;[Refs 4th c.BC+] —so in phrases like{πῶς γὰρ ἄν}; and πῶς οὐκ ἄν (i.e. εἴη); also in ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ (or ὡσπερανεί), as φοβούμενος ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ παῖς (i. e. ὥσπερ ἂν ἐφοβήθη εἰ παῖς ἦν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so τοσοῦτον ἐφρόνησαν, ὅσον περ ἂν (i.e. ἐφρόνησαν) εἰ.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare κἄν:—so the Verb of a protasis containing ἄν may be understood, ὅποι τις ἂν προσθῇ, κἂν μικρὰν δύναμιν (i. e. καὶ ἐὰν προσθῇ) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐμοῦ οὖν ἰόντος ὅπῃ ἂν καὶ ὑμεῖς (i.e. ἴητε) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.IV) ELLIPSIS OF ἄν:—when an apodosis consists of several co-ordinate clauses, ἄν is generally used only in the first and understood in the others: πείθοι᾽ ἂν εἰ πείθοι᾽· ἀπειθοίης δ᾽ ἴσως[Refs 4th c.BC+]: even when the construction is continued in a new sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is repeated for the sake of clearness or emphasis,[Refs 5th c.BC+] B) ἄν, [ᾱ], Attic dialect, ={ἐάν},{ἤν}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ[Refs 4th c.BC+]: not common in earlier Attic dialect Inscrr, [NT+4th c.BC+] C) ἄν or ἀν, Epic form of ἀνά, (which see) D) ἄν, shortened from ἄνα, see entry ἀνά G.
Strongs
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
án
Pronounciation:
an
Language:
Greek
Definition:
; (what-, where-, wither-, who-)soever; a primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty

I may place
Strongs:
Word:
θῶ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb 2nd Aorist Active Subjunctive 1st Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that maybe happened - by a person or thing that is speaking or writing
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to place
Tyndale
Word:
τίθημι
Transliteration:
tithēmi
Gloss:
to place
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
τίθημι, [in LXX for שִׁית,נתן,שׂוּם, etc;] 1) causative of κεῖμαι, (a) to place, lay, set: Luk.6:48, Rom.9:33, al; of laying the dead to rest, Mrk.15:47, Luk.23:55, Jhn.11:34, Act.7:16, al; before ἐπί, with genitive, Luk.8:16, Jhn.19:19, al; id. with accusative, Mrk.4:21, 2Co.3:13, al; ὑπό, Mat.5:15, al; παρά, Act.4:35, 37. Mid, to have put or placed, to place for oneself: of putting in prison, Act.4:3, 5:18, 25, al; of giving counsel, βουλήν, Act.27:12; of laying up in one's heart, Luk.1:66 21:14 (1Ki.21:12); (b) to put down, lay down: of bending the knees, τ. γόνατα, to kneel, Mrk.15:19, Act.7:60, al; of putting off garments, Jhn.13:4; of laying down life, τ. ψυχήν, Jhn.10:11, 15 17, 18 13:37, 38 15:13, 1Jn.3:16; of laying by money, παρ ̓ ἑαυτῷ, 1Co.16:2; of setting on food, Jhn.2:10; metaph, of setting forth an idea in symbolism, Mrk.4:30. 2) to set, fix, establish: ὑπόδειγμα, 2Pe.2:6. 3) to make, appoint: Mat.22:44, Mrk.12:36, Luk.20:43, Act.2:35, Rom.4:17, al. Mid, to make, set or appoint for oneself: Act.20:28, 1Co.12:28, 1Th.5:9, 1Ti.1:12, al; before ἵνα, Jhn.15:16 (cf. ἀνα, προσ-ανα, ἀπο, δια, ἀντι-δια, ἐκ, ἐπι, συν-επι, κατα, συν-κατα, μετα, παρα, περι, προ, προσ, συν, ὑπο-τίθημι). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
τίθημι
Transliteration:
tithēmi
Gloss:
to place
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
τίθημι [τῐ], 2nd pers. singular τιθεῖς [Refs 5th c.BC+] codices Lp (-θείς P, τίθης l), Alc. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (προσ-); ἐν-τιθεῖς (variant{-εὶς}) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but τίθης is found in [Refs 5th c.BC+] (προσ-), etc, and is taught by [Refs 4th c.AD+]; Epic dialect τίθησθα [Refs 8th c.BC+], and so in Aeolic dialect, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. singular τίθησι [Refs 8th c.BC+], and Attic dialect; Doric dialect τίθητι [Refs 4th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. plural τιθέασι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect and Ionic dialect τιθεῖσι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect τίθεισι (προ-) [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; Doric dialect τίθεντι [Refs]; Ionic dialect 3rd.pers. singular τιθεῖ [Refs 8th c.BC+]: imperfect ἐτίθην [Refs 5th c.BC+] (ἐν-), etc; ἐτίθει [Refs 8th c.BC+] (προσ-), etc, Epic dialect τίθει [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural τίθεσαν [NT+8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect imperfect τίθεσκον [Refs]; ἐτίθεα (ὑπερ-) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; infinitive τιθέναι, not in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect τιθήμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; written τιθῖν [Refs 4th c.AD+]; participle τιθείς, but Ionic dialect plural τιθεῦντες variant in [Refs 5th c.BC+]future θήσω, Epic dialect infinitive θησέμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]aorist 1 ἔθηκα, only used in indicative, and mostly in singular, for though 3rd.pers. plural is common, the [Refs] and 2nd pers. plural are rare, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even ἔθηκαν is very rare in early Attic, ἀνέθηκαν [Refs 4th c.BC+], but is found in [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural θῆκαν [Refs 8th c.BC+]aorist 2 ἔθην, not used in indicative singular, whereas plural is very common, ἔθεμεν, ἔθετε, ἔθεσαν, Epic dialect θέσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; subjunctive θῶ, Aeolic dialect and Ionic dialect θέω [Refs 7th c.BC+], Epic dialect θείω [Refs 8th c.BC+]; optative θείην, 1st pers. plural θεῖμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. plural θεῖεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; infinitive θεῖναι, Epic dialect θέμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect θέμειν [Refs 4th c.BC+]; participle θείς [Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect τέθηκα Attic dialect Inscrr, [Refs 4th c.BC+], etc, and in Papyri, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; τέθεικα [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; hence some editors restore τέθηκα for τέθεικα in Attic authors, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Phocian 3rd.pers. plural ἀνα-τεθέκαντι [Refs] —middle τίθεμαι, 2nd pers. singular τίθεσαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίθη or τίθῃ uncertain in [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; as passive, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect participle τιθήμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+]: future θήσομαι [Refs]aorist 1 ἒθηκάμην, only in indicative and participle, and never in Attic dialect; 2nd pers. singular ἐθήκαο [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Epic dialect 3rd.pers. singular θήκατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; participle θηκάμενος [Refs 6th c.BC+]: aorist 2 ἐθέμην [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect and Lyric poetry 3rd.pers. singular θέτο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; subjunctive θῶμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect 2nd pers. singular θῆαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; 3rd.pers. singular θεῖτο [Refs 8th c.BC+] are found in [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἐπιθοίμεθα, -θοιντο, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: perfect (see. below):—passive τίθεμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: future τεθήσομαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist ἐτέθην [Refs 6th c.BC+]perfect τέθειμαι, rare in early Gr, [LXX+NT+4th c.BC+]; infinitive τεθεῖσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle τεθειμένος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also used in middle sense, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὑπεκ-τεθημένος (sic) [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ἀνα-τέθηται (passive sense) [Refs 1st c.BC+]; Phocian perfect participle (middle sense) ἀνα-τεθεμένος [Refs]:— the passive never occurs in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A) in local sense, set, put, place, λίθον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τέρματα τ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; κλισίην, θρόνον τ. τινί, set a stool or chair for him, [Refs]set for oneself, δίφρον [Refs]lay down, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πόδα τ. plant the foot, i.e. walk, run, [Refs 5th c.BC+]middle, τετράποδος βάσιν θηρὸς τιθέμενος, i.e. going on all fours, [Refs] A.a) with adverbs, τ. τι πυρὸς ἐγγύς, ἀπάνευθε πυρός, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ ἄνω κάτω and τὰ κάτω ἄνω τ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—middle, ὅποι. τιθοῖτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.b) with Preps. of local sense, θεῖσα στέφανον ἀμφὶ βοστρύχοις [Refs 5th c.BC+] (middle, ἀμφ᾽ ὤμοισι τιθήμενον ἔντεα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀνά τινι or τι, as ἂμ βωμοῖσι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐπί τινος, τινι, or τι, as εἵματα ἐπ᾽ ἀπήνης [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ [θρόνον τὰ ἱμάτια] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν ἀρχὴν (i.e. τοῦ ἐπιδέσμου) κατὰ μεσοφρύου, ἐπὶ ἰνίον, etc, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ὑπό τινι or τι, as δέμνι᾽ ὑπ᾽ αἰθούσῃ [Refs 8th c.BC+], put in or put into. , as θῆκεν ἐν ἀκμοθέτῳ ἄκμονα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐν λεχέεσσι θ. [τινά] [Refs 8th c.BC+] put into the car,[NT]; ἐς λάρνακα, ἐς κάπετον, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (middle, ἐν τάφοισι θέσθε [Refs] A.c) in Poets also with dative only, χρήματα μυχῷ ἄντρου [Refs 8th c.BC+] (so in middle, κολεῷ ἄορ θέο [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II) Special phrases: A.II.1) θεῖναί τινί τι ἐν χερσίν, ἐν χειρί, put it in his hands, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐν χερσί or χείρεσσί τινος [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐς χεῖρά τινος into his hand, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.2) of women, θέσθαι παῖδα, υἱὸν ὑπὸ ζώνῃ, to have a child put under her girdle, i.e. to conceive, [Refs] A.II.3) ἐν ὄμμασι θέσθαι set before one's eyes, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.4) set a plant, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.4.b) lay a mosaic, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.II.5) θέσθαι τὴν ψῆφον lay one's voting-pebble on the altar, put it into the urn, ἐς τεῦχος οὐ διχορρόπως ψήφους ἔθεντο [Refs 4th c.BC+]: hence simply, give one's vote, ἐπὶ φόνῳ for death, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἑωυτῷ in one's own favour, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εὔφρονα, δικαίαν τὴν ψῆφον τ, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; and in passive, ἔστω δὴ φανερὰ ἡ ψῆφος τιθεμένη [Refs 5th c.BC+], with infinitive, give one's opinion, [Refs 5th c.BC+] absolutely, vote, γνώμῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τινι [Refs 2nd c.AD+] A.II.6) in [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc, put or plant it in his heart, ἐν στήθεσσι τιθεῖ νόον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; βουλὴν ἐν στήθεσσι τ[Refs] —middle, ἄγριον ἐν στήθεσσι θέτο θυμόν laid up wrath in his heart, treasured it there,[Refs]; τοῖσιν κότον αἰνὸν ἔθεσθε harboured enmity against them,[Refs 6th c.BC+]; ἐνὶ φρεσὶ θέσθαι, with infinitive, bear in mind, think of doing a thing, [NT+8th c.BC+] A.II.7) deposit, as in a bank, τὰ πρυτανεῖα πρὸς τοὺς ἄρχοντας [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc:—middle, τὰ ἡμίσεα τῆς οὐσίης θέσθαι παρά τινα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐγγύην θέσθαι [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—passive, τὰ ληφθέντα καὶ τὰ τεθεντα [Refs 4th c.BC+]active and middle are sometimes distinguished, ὁ θείς the mortgagor, ὁ θέμενος the mortgagee, τοὺς θέντας ἡμᾶς ἢ καὶ τοὺς θεμένους ὑμᾶς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίθεσθαι seems to have the same meaning as ὑποτίθεσθαι in [Refs 4th c.BC+], but the two are distinguished in [Refs 4th c.BC+] deposit a claim for favour with one, lay an obligation on one, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.8) pay down, pay, τόκον, εἰσφοράν, μετοίκιον, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὰ μέρη [Refs 3rd c.BC+]:—middle, θέμενος ἀρραβῶνα [Refs 6th c.AD+] A.II.9) put down in writing, θοῦ δ᾽ ἐν φρενῶν δέλτοισι τοὺς ἐμοὺς λόγους [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, τὰ ἐν γράμμασι τεθέντα [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.9.b) place to account, reckon, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—metaphorically in middle, ἀλλ᾽ οὐκ ἀκριβῶς αὐτὸ θήσομαι λίαν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τἀγαθὰ ἐς ἀμφίβολον ἀσφαλῶς ἔθεντο reckoned as doubtful, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.10) in military language, τίθεσθαι or θέσθαι τὰ ὅπλα has four senses, A.II.10.a) rest arms, i.e. halt, with arms in an easy position but ready for action, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; θέμενοι ἐς τὴν ἀγορὰν τὰ ὅπλα advancing to the market-place and resting arms there, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀντία τισί over against them, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; poetry, πάτρας ἕνεκα εἰς δῆριν ἔθεντο ὅπλα Inscription cited in [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.II.10.b) bear arms, fight, τὸ θυμοειδὲς. ἐν τῇ τῆς ψυχῆς στάσει τίθεσθαι τὰ ὅπλα πρὸς τὸ λογιστικόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so ὁπόσοιπερ ἂν ὅπλα ἱππικὰ ἢ πεζικὰ τιθῶνται who serve on horseback or on foot, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.10.c) lay down one's arms, surrender, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; so, without the idea of surrender, θέσθαι τὰς ἀσπίδας [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but active, τὰ ὅπλα θείς [Refs 1st c.AD+] A.II.10.d) τὰ ὅπλα εὖ τίθεσθε keep your arms in good order, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.II) lay in the grave, bury, ἐμὰ σῶν ἀπάνευθε τιθήμεναι ὀστέα [Refs]; ποῦ σφε θήσομεν χθονό; [Refs 4th c.BC+]:— passive, τὰ δὲ ὀστᾶ φασι. τεθῆναι. ἐν τῇ Ἀττικῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.12) τιθέναι τὰ γόνατα kneel down, [NT] A.III) set up, of the prizes in games, ἄεθλα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀέθλιον[Refs 5th c.BC+] the prizes, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; also with the object offered as the prize, τ. δέπας, βοῦν, σόλον, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+] more generally, lay before people as common property, βούλομαι ὑμῖν εἰς τὸ μέσον αὐτὸ θεῖναι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; reading and sense are doubtful in [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.III.2) set up in a temple, dedicate, ἀγάλματα [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.IV) assign, award, τιμήν τινι [Refs 8th c.BC+]middle, ὄνομα (or οὔνομα) θέσθαι τινί give a child a name at one's own discretion, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) τιθέναι νόμον down or give a law, of a legislator, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—so in middle, of Solon, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of a people, state, or legislature, give oneself a law, make a law, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (passive, τίθεται νόμος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also θήσω θεσμόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; σκῆψιν τιθέναι allege an excuse, [Refs]: with accusative et infinitive, order matters so that. , [ὁ Λυκοῦργος] ἔθηκε θύειν βασιλέα πρὸ τῆς πόλεως τὰ δημόσια ἅπαντα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; without infinitive, καλῶς ἔθεντο ταῦτα πατέρες οἱ πάλαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with dative et infinitive, γυναιξὶ σωφρονεῖν. θήσει [Refs] A.V.2) middle, agree upon, ἡμέραν θέσθαι [Refs 4th c.BC+]; so θ. συγγραφήν, ὁμολογίαν, σύμβολόν τινι, etc, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.V.3) execute a document. τ. διαθήκην make a will, [Refs 5th c.AD+]: so in middle, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; θέσθαι τινὸς ἀπαρχήν make out a person's birth-certificate, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VI) establish, institute, ἀγῶνας [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς ἀγώνοις οἷς ἁ πόλις τίφητι (sic) [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; πενταετηρίδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII) dispose, order, ordain, bring to pass, of gods, οὕτω νῦν Ζεὺς θείη [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ δ᾽ ἄλλα πάντ᾽ ἄνω τε καὶ κάτω στρέφων τίθησιν (i.e. Ζεύς) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πάντα παγκάκως θεοὶ θέσαν conjecture in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κόσμῳ θέντες, as etymology of θεοί, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of human beings, administer, manage, [τι] κακῶς θέμεν, εὖ θέμεν, [Refs 6th c.BC+]; ταῦτ᾽ ἐγὼ θήσω καλῶς [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle, administer for oneself, οἶκον εὖ θέσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+], [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ παρὸν εὖ θέσθαι make the best of one's resources or situation, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; συνετῶν ἀνδρῶν (i.e. εἶναι), πρὶν γενέσθαι τὰ δυσχερῆ, προνοῆσαι ὅπως μὴ γένηται· ἀνδρείων δέ, γενόμενα εὖ θέσθαι [Refs 6th c.BC+]; τὸ κοινῶς φοβερὸν ἅπαντας εὖ θέσθαι that all should face the common danger, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of wars, quarrels, etc, bring them to a successful issue, but sometimes put a good face on them, patch them up, ἕως ἂν τὸν πόλεμον εὖ θῶνται [Refs]; πόλεμον ἀραμένους οὐ ῥᾴδιον εὐπρεπῶς θέσθαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄμεινον ἢ τότε ἐθέμεθα τὸν πόλεμον[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) in the game of πεττεία, κυβεία, Latin tesserae (compare [Refs], to place as skilfully as possible the pieces which have been assigned to one by the luck of the dice, πεττείᾳ τινὶ ἔοικεν ὁ βίος, καὶ δεῖ ὥσπερ ψῆφόν τινα τίθεσθαι τὸ συμβαῖνον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ δεσποτῶν γὰρ εὖ πεσόντα θήσομαι I will take advantage of my master's good luck, [Refs 4th c.BC+]: many of the passages cited in [Refs 4th c.BC+] B) put in a certain state or condition, much the same as ποιεῖν, ποιεῖσθαι, and so often to be rendered by our make: B.I) followed by an attributive substantive, make one something, with the predicate in apposition, θεῖναί τινα αἰχμητήν, ἱέρειαν, μάντιν, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θεῖναί τινα ἄλοχόν τινος make her another's wife, of a third person who negotiates a marriage, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἥτε με τοῖον ἔθηκεν ὅπως ἐθέλει who has made me such as she will, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σῦς ἔθηκας ἑταίρους thou hast made my comrades swine,[LXX+8th c.BC+]; but γέλων ἔθηκε συνδείπνοις caused them laughter, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; λόγους εἰς μέτρα τ. put them into verse, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) with an adjective for the attributive, θεῖναί τινα ἀθάνατον καὶ ἀγήρων make him undying and undecaying, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πηρόν, τυφλόν, ἀφνειὸν τ. τινά, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) of things, ἅλιον πόνον, πόνον οὐκ ἀτέλεστον, πάντα μεταμώνια, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀναστάτους οἴκους τ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ πραχθὲν ἀγένητον τ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) frequently in middle, γυναῖκα or ἄκοιτιν θέσθαι τινά make her one's wife, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; παῖδα τὸν αὑτᾶς πόσιν θ. take her own son as husband, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.3.b) υἱὸν θέσθαι τινά, like{ποιεῖσθαι}, make one's son, adopt, [Refs 5th c.BC+] adopt, [Refs 1st c.AD+] B.I.3.c) generally, προσφιλῆ θέσθαι τινά [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but φίλον ἐμαυτῷ θ. deem my friend, [Refs]; γέλωτα θέσθαι τινά make him one's butt, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.4) with infinitive, make one do so and so, τιθέναι τινὰ νικᾶσαι make him conquer, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) in reference to mental action, when middle is more frequently than active, lay down. assume, hold, reckon or regard as. , τί δ᾽ ἐλέγχεα ταῦτα τίθεσθ; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θὲς δή μοι. now suppose so and so, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) followed by adverbs, ποῦ χρὴ τίθεσθαι ταῦτ; in what light must we regard these things? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδαμοῦ τιθέναι τι hold of no account, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρόσθεν or ἐπίπροσθέν τινος τιθέναι τι, [Refs]; πόρρω τίθεσθαί τί τινων set far below, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.3) followed by Preps, τ. τινὰ ἐν φιλοσόφοις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also εἰς ὁποτέραν (of two classes) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰς τὸν δῆμον, εἰς τοὺς πλουσίους, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἐν οἰωνῷ τινι τοῦ μέλλοντος, ἐν ἐπαίνῳ, ἐν γέλωτι τίθεσθαι, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; θέσθαι παρ᾽ οὐδέν set at naught, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν παρέργῳ θοῦ με [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πάντα ταῦτ᾽ ἐν εὐχερεῖ ἔθου[Refs 5th c.BC+]; θέσθαι τὰ δίκαια ἔκ τινος estimate them by, [Refs] B.II.4) with partitive genitive, ἐμὲ θὲς τῶν πεπεισμένων put me down as one of the convinced, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ἡμετέρας ἀμελείας ἄν τις θείη might reckon it as due to our carelessness, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.5) with infinitive, οὐ τίθημ᾽ ἐγὼ ζῆν τοῦτον I hold not that he lives, count him not as living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so in middle, [Refs 5th c.BC+]participle, θήσω ἀδικοῦντα [αὐτόν] [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.6) elliptically, lay down, assume, θῶμεν δύο εἴδη (i.e. εἶναι) [Refs]; θήσω οὕτω (i.e. εἶναί τι) [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.7) affirm, opposed to αἴρω (deny), τὸ ἐπέκεινα ὄντος οὐ τόδε λέγει- οὐ γὰρ τίθησιν--the phrase 'beyond being' does not denote a 'this' (for it is not an affirmation), [Refs 3rd c.AD+] C) without any attributive word following, make, work, execute, of an artist, ἐν δ᾽ ἐτίθει νειόν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; [δόρπον] θησέμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.2) make, cause, bring to pass, ἔργα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; φιλότητα, ὅρκια μετ᾽ ἀμφ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.3) frequently in middle, make or prepare for oneself, θέσθαι κέλευθον make oneself a road, open a way, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τίθεντο δὲ δαῖτα, δόρπα, [Refs 8th c.BC+] are holding a feast, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μεγάλην ἐπιγουνίδα θέσθαι to make oneself, get a large thigh, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θέσθαι μάχην engage in. , [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἱδρῶτα τίθεσθαι have an access of perspiration, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μαρτύρια θέσθαι produce as testimony, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνδρὸς αἰδοίου πρόσοψιν θηκάμενος putting on the aspect of a reverend man, [Refs 5th c.BC+] see at {θήκατ; πόνον πλέω τίθου} work thyself the more annoy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.4) periphrastic for a single Verb. μνηστήρων σκέδασιν θεῖναι make a scattering, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θέμεν κρυφόν, νέμεσιν, αἶνον, for κρύπτειν, νεμεσῦν, αἰνεῖν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὑμῖν ἔθηκε σὺν θεοῖς σωτηρίαν (variant{προμηθίαν}) [Refs 5th c.BC+] — also in middle, θέσθαι μάχην, for μάχεσθαι, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θέσθαι θυσίαν, γάμον, for θύειν, γαμεῖσθαι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; σπουδήν, πρόνοιαν θέσθαι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and with genitive, θ. λησμοσύναν, συγγνωμοσύνην τινῶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. (Cf. Lithuanian dēti 'lay (eggs, etc.)', Sanskrit dáti 'lay down, place', Latin -do in con-do, etc, Engl. do, doom.)
Strongs
Word:
τίθημι
Transliteration:
títhēmi
Pronounciation:
theh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to place (in the widest application, literally and figuratively; properly, in a passive or horizontal posture, and thus different from g2476 (ἵστημι), which properly denotes an upright and active position, while g2749 (κεῖμαι) is properly reflexive and utterly prostrate); + advise, appoint, bow, commit, conceive, give, X kneel down, lay (aside, down, up), make, ordain, purpose, put, set (forth), settle, sink down; a prolonged form of a primary (which is used only as alternate in certain tenses);

the
Strongs:
Word:
τοὺς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Plural Masculine
Grammar:
SPECIFIC male people or things that are having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»010:G2190
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

enemies
Strongs:
Word:
ἐχθρούς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Plural Masculine
Grammar:
male PEOPLE OR THINGS that are having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
enemy
Tyndale
Word:
ἐχθρός
Transliteration:
echthros
Gloss:
enemy
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun
Definition:
ἐχθρός, -ά, -όν (< ἔχθος, hatred), [in LXX chiefly for אֵיבָה, also for עָר, etc;] 1) hated, hateful (Hom.): opp. to ἀγαπητός, Rom.11:28. 2) Actively, hating, hostile: Rom.5:10, 1Co.15:25, 2Th.3:15; with genitive of person(s) (cl.), Jas.4:4; τ. διανοίᾳ, Col.1:21; ἐ. ἄνθρωπος, Mat.13:28; as subst, ὁ ἐ, an enemy, 1Co.15:26; the devil, Mat.13:39, Luk.10:19; with genitive of person(s), Mat.22:44 Mrk.12:36, Luk.20:43, Act.2:35, 1Co.15:25, Heb.1:13 10:13 " (LXX); Mat.5:43-44 10:36 13:25, Luk.1:71, 74 6:27, 35 19:27, 43, Rom.12:20, Gal.4:16, Rev.11:5, 12; with genitive of thing(s), Act.13:10, Php.3:18. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἐχθρός
Transliteration:
echthros
Gloss:
enemy
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun
Definition:
ἐχθρός, ά, όν, (ἔχθος) hated, hateful, of persons and things, frequently from [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐ. γάρ μοι κεῖνος ὁμῶς Ἀΐδαο πύλῃσι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐχθρὸν δέ μοί ἐστιν c.infinitive, 'tis hateful to me to, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; compare θεοισεχθρός. II) active, hating, hostile, first in [Refs 8th c.BC+] averse from insolence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) as substantive, ἐχθρός, ὁ, enemy, where the active and passive senses frequently coincide, [Refs 8th c.BC+] is one who has been φίλος, but is alienated; πολέμιος one who is at war; δυσμενής one who has long been alienated and refuses to be reconciled. IV) regular comparative ἐχθρότερος [Refs 4th c.BC+]; superlative -ότατος [Refs 5th c.BC+] V) adverb ἐχθρῶς, μισοῦντες [Refs 5th c.BC+]: comparative -οτέρως [Refs 4th c.BC+]: superlative -ότατα [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ἐχθρός
Transliteration:
echthrós
Pronounciation:
ech-thros'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
hateful (passively, odious, or actively, hostile); usually as a noun, an adversary (especially Satan); enemy, foe; from a primary (to hate);

of You,
Strongs:
Word:
σου
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun 2nd Genitive Singular
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned person being spoken or written to that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
your
Conjoined:
«010:G2190
Tyndale
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
su
Gloss:
you
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
σύ, pron. of 2nd of person(s), thou, you, genitive, σοῦ, dative, σοί, accusative, σέ, pl, ὑμεῖς, -ῶν, -ῖν, -ᾶς (enclitic in oblique cases sing, except after prep. (BL, §48, 3), though πρὸς σέ occurs in Mat.25:39). Nom. for emphasis or contrast: Jhn.1:30, 4:10, 5:33, 39, 44, Act.4:7, Eph.5:32; so also perhaps σὺ εἶπας, Mat.26:64, al. (M, Pr., 86); before voc, Mat.2:6, Luk.1:76, Jhn.17:5, al; sometimes without emphasis (M, Pr., 85f.), as also in cl, but esp. as rendering of Heb. phrase, e.g. υἱός μου εἶ σύ (בְּנִי־אַתָּה, Psa.2:7), Act.13:33. The genitive (σοῦ, ὑμῶν) is sometimes placed bef. the noun: Luk.7:48, 12:30, al; so also the enclitic σοῦ, Mat.9:6; on τί ἐμοὶ κ. σοί, see: ἐγώ. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
su
Gloss:
you
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
σύ [ῠ], thou: pronoun of the second person:—Epic dialect nominative τύνη [ῡ] [Refs 8th c.BC+] (Laconian dialect τούνη [Refs 5th c.AD+]; Aeolic dialect σύ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect τύ [ῠ] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τού [short syllable] [Refs 6th c.BC+] (also τούν [Refs]σύ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]—Gen. σοῦ, [Refs], elsewhere only Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; enclitic σου, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (also in Lyric poetry, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (which also occurs in Lyric poetry, [Refs 7th c.BC+], and as enclitic σευ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], σεο (enclitic) [Refs] σευ (enclitic) [Refs]:—Doric dialect τεῦ, τευ, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; rarely τέο, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τεῦς [Refs 6th c.BC+]; Doric dialect τεοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοι variant in [Refs]; enclitic τεος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; other Doric dialect forms are τίω, τίως, both [Refs 3rd c.BC+]—Dat. σοί, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc; Doric dialect τοί [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect, Lesb, and Ionic dialect enclitic τοι[Refs 8th c.BC+], Lesbian Lyric poetry, and Ionic dialect Lyric poetry and Prose τοι is always enclitic, σοί never enclitic (τοί and σοι are not found except σοι [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in codices of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; rarer than τοι in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect both σοί and σοι (enclitic) are used (σοί [Refs 5th c.BC+], τοί and τοι are not used; σοι is never elided except in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect and Lyric poetry also τεΐν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τίν [ῐ], [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τίν [ῑ], [Refs 3rd c.BC+] before a consonant, [Refs 7th c.BC+]—Acc. σέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; enclitic σε,[Refs 7th c.BC+]; in late Gr. σέν, [Refs]; Doric dialect τέ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τ᾽ variant (codex R) in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τρέ (to be read τϝέ) [Refs 5th c.AD+]; or (enclitic) τυ [Refs 6th c.BC+] 2) in combination with γε, σύ γε, σέ γε, etc. (compare ἔγωγε), thou at least, for thy part, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] and Attic dialect; Doric dialect τύγε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τούγα [Refs 2nd c.AD+]: dative σοί γε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: accusative σέ γε [Refs], etc:—also σύ περ [Refs] 3) σύ with infinitive (as imperative), [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) Dual nominative and accusative σφῶϊ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], you two, both of you; σφώ (not σφῴ,[Refs 8th c.BC+]—Gen. and Dat. σφῶϊν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; contraction σφῷν once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]. None of these forms are enclitic, [Refs 5th c.BC+] enclitic; Ζεὺς σφὼ is prescribed in [Refs 8th c.BC+] —σφῶϊ is never dative; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] it is the accusative depending on κελεύ; σφῶϊν is never accusative; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) Plur. nominative ὑμεῖς, [Refs 8th c.BC+], ye, you; Aeolic dialect and Epic dialect ὔμμες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμές [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect οὐμές [Refs 6th c.BC+]; a resolved form ὑμέες, [Refs 1st c.BC+] rather than genuine Ionic [Refs 5th c.BC+]— Gen. ὑμῶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὑμέων (disyllable) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὑμέων also [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμέων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὑμῶν, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Aeolic dialect ὑμμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect οὐμίων [Refs 6th c.BC+]—Dat. ὑμῖν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect enclitic ὗμῐν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] also Doric dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Doric dialect (not enclitic) ὑμίν [ῐ] [Refs]; ὑμίν [ῐ] also in [Refs 5th c.BC+] should perhaps be restored where the sense needs an enclitic on the principle stated by [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ὕμιν[Refs 8th c.BC+]—Acc. ὑμᾶς, [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc. ( [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὗμας or (more probably) ὕμας is required by the metre in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Ionic dialect ὑμέας (disyllable) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; enclitic ὕμεας (disyllable) [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ὑμέας also [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect and Epic dialect ὔμμε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμέ [Refs 7th c.BC+]—The plural is sometimes used in addressing one person, when others are included in the speaker's thought, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] cf. Latin tu, Gothic pu; with τοι Sanskrit genitive and dative te; the origin of σφῶϊ is doubtful; with ὑμεῖς cf. Sanskrit accusative plural yusmān.)
Strongs
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
soo
Language:
Greek
Definition:
thou; thou; the personal pronoun of the second person singular;

[as] a footstool
Strongs:
Word:
ὑποπόδιον
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a neuter PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
footstool
Tyndale
Word:
ὑποπόδιον
Transliteration:
hupopodion
Gloss:
footstool
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
ὑποπόδιον, -ου, τό (< ὑπό, πούς), [in LXX: Psa.99:5 110:1, Isa.66:1, La 2:1 (הֲדֹם) *;] a footstool (= cl. θρᾶνος): Jas.2:3; metaph, Mat.5:35, Mrk.12:36 (ὑποκάτω, WH, R, mg.), Luk.20:43, Act.2:35 7:49, Heb.1:13 10:13 (all, except Mt, l.with, from LXX, Psa.110:1, Isa.66:1) (for exx, see Deiss, BS, 223). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὑποπόδιον
Transliteration:
hupopodion
Gloss:
footstool
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
ὑποπόδ-ιον, τό, footstool, [LXX+4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ὑποπόδιον
Transliteration:
hypopódion
Pronounciation:
hoop-op-od'-ee-on
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Neuter
Definition:
something under the feet, i.e. a foot-rest (figuratively); footstool; neuter of a compound of g5259 (ὑπό) and g4228 (πούς);

of the
Strongs:
Word:
τῶν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Genitive Plural Masculine
Grammar:
SPECIFIC male people or things that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
the
Conjoined:
»018:G4228
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

feet
Strongs:
Word:
ποδῶν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Plural Masculine
Grammar:
male PEOPLE OR THINGS that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
foot
Tyndale
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
pous
Gloss:
foot
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πούς, ποδός, ὁ [in LXX chiefly for רֶגֶל;] a foot, both of men and beasts: Mat.4:6 (LXX), Mrk.9:45, Luk.1:79, Jhn.11:44, Act.7:5, al; ὑπο τοὺς π, Rom.16:20, 1Co.15:25 15:27 Eph.1:22, Heb.2:8; ὑποκάτω τῶν π, Mat.22:44 (LXX); πρὸς (παρὰ) τοὺς π, Mrk.5:22, Luk.8:41, al; figuratively, Mat.15:30, Luk.10:39, Act.5:2, al; ἔμπροσθεν τῶν π, Rev.3:9 19:10, al; ἐπὶ τοὺς π, Act.10:25. By meton, of a person in motion (Psa.119:101): Luk.1:79, Act.5:9, Rom.3:15 10:15, Heb.12:13 (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
pous
Gloss:
foot
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πούς, ὁ, ποδός, ποδί, πόδα (not ποῦν, Thom.Mag.p.257 R.): dative plural ποσί, Epic dialect and Lyric poetry ποσσί (also [Refs 5th c.BC+] once πόδεσι [Refs 5th c.BC+] Epic dialect ποδοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—Doric dialect nominative πός (compare ἀρτίπος, πούλυπος, etc.) [Refs], but πούς [Refs]; πῶς· πός, ὑπὸ Δωριέων, [Refs 5th c.AD+] (perhaps πός· πούς, ὑ.Δ.); Laconian dialect πόρ, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]:—foot, both of men and beasts, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in plural, also, a bird's talons, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; arms or feelers of a polypus, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: properly the foot from the ankle down wards, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ξύλινος π, of an artificial foot, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but also of the leg with the foot, as χείρ for the arm and hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 2) foot as that with which one runs, πόδας ὠκὺς Ἀχιλλεύς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; frequently with reference to swiftness, περιγιγνόμεθ᾽ ἄλλων πύξ τε. ἠδὲ πόδεσσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποσὶν ἐρίζειν to race on foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ποδῶν τιμά, αἴγλα, ἀρετά, ὁρμά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (ποσσί, πόδεσσι) is added to many Verbs denoting motion, π. βήσετο, παρέδραμον, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also emphatically with Verbs denoting to trample or tread upon, πόσσι καταστείβοισι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; πόδα βαίνειν, see at {βαίνω} [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πόδα τιθέναι to journey, [Refs 5th c.BC+] started on its homeward way, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χειρῶν ἔκβαλλον ὀρείους πόδας ναός, i. e. oars, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φωνὴ τῶν π. τοῦ ὑετοῦ sound of the pattering of rain, [LXX] 3) as a point of measurement, ἐς πόδας ἐκ κεφαλῆς from head to foot, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4) πρόσθε ποδός or ποδῶν, προπάροιθε ποδῶν, just before one, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4.b) παρά or πὰρ ποδός off-hand, at once, ἀνελέσθαι πὰρ ποδός [Refs 6th c.BC+]close at hand, [Refs]; but παραὶ ποσὶ κάππεσε θυμός sank to their feet, [Refs 8th c.BC+]in a moment, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; close behind, Νέμεσις δέ γε πὰρ πόδας (to be read πόδα) βαίνει Prov. cited in [Refs]; also παρὰ πόδας immediately afterwards [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; τὰ ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ καὶ παρὰ πόδας at his very feet, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.c) ἐν ποσί in one's way, close at hand, τὸν ἐν π. γινόμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]everyday matters, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.d) τὸ πρὸς ποσί, ={τὸ ἐν ποσί}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 4.e) all these phrases are opposed to ἐκ ποδῶν out of the way, far off, written ἐκποδών [Refs 5th c.BC+] 5) to denote close pursuit, ἐκ ποδὸς ἕπεσθαι follow in the track, i.e. close behind, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 5.b) in earlier writers κατὰ πόδας on the heels of a person, [LXX+5th c.BC+]on the moment, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ κατὰ πόδας ἡμέρα the very next day, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] catch it running, [Refs 5th c.BC+] march, come close at his heels, on his track, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῇ κατὰ π. ἡμέρᾳ τῆς ἐκκλησίας on the day immediately after it, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 6) various phrases: 6.a) ἀνὰ πόδα backwards, [Refs 5th c.AD+] 6.b) ἐπὶ πόδα backwards facing the enemy, ἐπὶ π. ἀναχωρεῖν, ἀνάγειν, ἀναχάζεσθαι, to retire without turning to fly, leisurely, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but γίνεται ἡ ἔξοδος οἷον ἐπὶ πόδας the offspring is as it were born feetforemost, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 6.c) περὶ πόδα, properly of a shoe, round the foot, i.e. fitting exactly, ὡς ἔστι μοι τὸ χρῆμα τοῦτο περὶ πόδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.d) ὡς ποδῶνἔχει as he is off for feet, i. e. as quick as he can, ὡς ποδῶν εἶχον [τάχιστα] ἐβοήθεον [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.e) ἔξω τινὸς πόδα ἔχειν keep one's foot out of a thing, i. e. be clear of it, ἔξω κομίζων πηλοῦ πόδα [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.f) ἀμφοῖν ποδοῖν, etc, to denote energetic action, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τερπωλῆς ἐπέβημεν ὅλῳ ποδί with all the foot, i.e. entirely, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 6.g) τὴν ὑπὸ πόδα [κατάστασιν] just below them, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ὑπὸ πόδας τίθεσθαι trample under foot, scorn, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; οἱ ὑπὸ πόδα those next below them (in rank), [Refs 1st c.AD+]; ὑπὸ πόδα χωρεῖν recede, decline, of strength, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] middle cited in [Refs 4th c.AD+] 6.h) for ὀρθῷ ποδί, see at {ὀρθός} [Refs] 6.k) ἁλιεῖς ἀπὸ ποδός probably fishermen who fish from the land, not from boats, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ποτίσαι ἀπὸ ποδός perhaps irrigate by the feet (of oxen turning the irrigation-wheel), [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; τόπον. ἀπὸ ποδὸς ἐξηρτισμένον uncertain meaning in [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 1) ἀγγεῖον. τρήματα ἐκ τῶν ὑπὸ ποδὸς ἔχον round the bottom, [Refs 1st c.AD+] 7) πούς τινος, as periphrastic for a person as coming, etc, σὺν πατρὸς μολὼν ποδί, i.e. σὺν πατρί, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ἐξ ἑνὸς ποδός, i.e. μόνος ὤν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ δ᾽ ἀφ᾽ ἡσύχου π, i.e. οἱ ἡσύχως ζῶντες, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) metaphorically, of things, foot, lowest part, especially foot of a hill, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of a table, couch, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare πέζ; of the side strokes at the foot of the letter Ω, Callias cited in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ={ποδεών}[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) in a ship, πόδες are the two lower corners of the sail, or the ropes fastened therelo, by which the sails are tightened or slackened, sheets [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χαλᾶν πόδα ease off the sheet, as is done when a squall is coming, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦ ποδὸς παρίει let go hold of it, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐκπετάσουσι πόδα ναός (with reference to the sail), [Refs 5th c.BC+] haul it tight, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ναῦς ἐνταθεῖσα ποδί a ship with her sheet close hauled, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2.b) perhaps of the rudder or steering-paddle, αἰεὶ γὰρ πόδα νηὸς ἐνώμων [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) a foot, as a measure of length, = [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) foot in Prosody, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so of a metrical phrase or passage, ἔκμετρα καὶ ὑπὲρ τὸν π. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of a long passage declaimed in one breath, κήρυκες ὅταν τὸν καλούμενον πόδα μέλλωσιν ἐρεῖν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) boundary stone, [Refs 4th c.BC+]. (Cf. Latin pes, Gothic fotus, etc. 'foot'; related to πέδον as noted by [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
πούς
Transliteration:
poús
Pronounciation:
pooce
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a "foot" (figuratively or literally); foot(-stool); a primary word;

of You.”’
Strongs:
Word:
σου
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun 2nd Genitive Singular
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned person being spoken or written to that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
of you
Conjoined:
«018:G4228
Tyndale
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
su
Gloss:
you
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
σύ, pron. of 2nd of person(s), thou, you, genitive, σοῦ, dative, σοί, accusative, σέ, pl, ὑμεῖς, -ῶν, -ῖν, -ᾶς (enclitic in oblique cases sing, except after prep. (BL, §48, 3), though πρὸς σέ occurs in Mat.25:39). Nom. for emphasis or contrast: Jhn.1:30, 4:10, 5:33, 39, 44, Act.4:7, Eph.5:32; so also perhaps σὺ εἶπας, Mat.26:64, al. (M, Pr., 86); before voc, Mat.2:6, Luk.1:76, Jhn.17:5, al; sometimes without emphasis (M, Pr., 85f.), as also in cl, but esp. as rendering of Heb. phrase, e.g. υἱός μου εἶ σύ (בְּנִי־אַתָּה, Psa.2:7), Act.13:33. The genitive (σοῦ, ὑμῶν) is sometimes placed bef. the noun: Luk.7:48, 12:30, al; so also the enclitic σοῦ, Mat.9:6; on τί ἐμοὶ κ. σοί, see: ἐγώ. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
su
Gloss:
you
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
σύ [ῠ], thou: pronoun of the second person:—Epic dialect nominative τύνη [ῡ] [Refs 8th c.BC+] (Laconian dialect τούνη [Refs 5th c.AD+]; Aeolic dialect σύ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect τύ [ῠ] [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τού [short syllable] [Refs 6th c.BC+] (also τούν [Refs]σύ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]—Gen. σοῦ, [Refs], elsewhere only Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; enclitic σου, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (also in Lyric poetry, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (which also occurs in Lyric poetry, [Refs 7th c.BC+], and as enclitic σευ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], σεο (enclitic) [Refs] σευ (enclitic) [Refs]:—Doric dialect τεῦ, τευ, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; rarely τέο, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τεῦς [Refs 6th c.BC+]; Doric dialect τεοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοι variant in [Refs]; enclitic τεος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; other Doric dialect forms are τίω, τίως, both [Refs 3rd c.BC+]—Dat. σοί, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc; Doric dialect τοί [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Doric dialect, Lesb, and Ionic dialect enclitic τοι[Refs 8th c.BC+], Lesbian Lyric poetry, and Ionic dialect Lyric poetry and Prose τοι is always enclitic, σοί never enclitic (τοί and σοι are not found except σοι [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in codices of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; rarer than τοι in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect both σοί and σοι (enclitic) are used (σοί [Refs 5th c.BC+], τοί and τοι are not used; σοι is never elided except in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect and Lyric poetry also τεΐν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τίν [ῐ], [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τίν [ῑ], [Refs 3rd c.BC+] before a consonant, [Refs 7th c.BC+]—Acc. σέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; enclitic σε,[Refs 7th c.BC+]; in late Gr. σέν, [Refs]; Doric dialect τέ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τ᾽ variant (codex R) in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τρέ (to be read τϝέ) [Refs 5th c.AD+]; or (enclitic) τυ [Refs 6th c.BC+] 2) in combination with γε, σύ γε, σέ γε, etc. (compare ἔγωγε), thou at least, for thy part, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] and Attic dialect; Doric dialect τύγε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τούγα [Refs 2nd c.AD+]: dative σοί γε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: accusative σέ γε [Refs], etc:—also σύ περ [Refs] 3) σύ with infinitive (as imperative), [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) Dual nominative and accusative σφῶϊ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], you two, both of you; σφώ (not σφῴ,[Refs 8th c.BC+]—Gen. and Dat. σφῶϊν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; contraction σφῷν once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]. None of these forms are enclitic, [Refs 5th c.BC+] enclitic; Ζεὺς σφὼ is prescribed in [Refs 8th c.BC+] —σφῶϊ is never dative; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] it is the accusative depending on κελεύ; σφῶϊν is never accusative; in [Refs 8th c.BC+] III) Plur. nominative ὑμεῖς, [Refs 8th c.BC+], ye, you; Aeolic dialect and Epic dialect ὔμμες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμές [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect οὐμές [Refs 6th c.BC+]; a resolved form ὑμέες, [Refs 1st c.BC+] rather than genuine Ionic [Refs 5th c.BC+]— Gen. ὑμῶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὑμέων (disyllable) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὑμέων also [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμέων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὑμῶν, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Aeolic dialect ὑμμέων [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect οὐμίων [Refs 6th c.BC+]—Dat. ὑμῖν, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect enclitic ὗμῐν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] also Doric dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Doric dialect (not enclitic) ὑμίν [ῐ] [Refs]; ὑμίν [ῐ] also in [Refs 5th c.BC+] should perhaps be restored where the sense needs an enclitic on the principle stated by [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ὕμιν[Refs 8th c.BC+]—Acc. ὑμᾶς, [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc. ( [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὗμας or (more probably) ὕμας is required by the metre in [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Ionic dialect ὑμέας (disyllable) [Refs 8th c.BC+]; enclitic ὕμεας (disyllable) [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ὑμέας also [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect and Epic dialect ὔμμε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Doric dialect ὑμέ [Refs 7th c.BC+]—The plural is sometimes used in addressing one person, when others are included in the speaker's thought, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] cf. Latin tu, Gothic pu; with τοι Sanskrit genitive and dative te; the origin of σφῶϊ is doubtful; with ὑμεῖς cf. Sanskrit accusative plural yusmān.)
Strongs
Word:
σύ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
soo
Language:
Greek
Definition:
thou; thou; the personal pronoun of the second person singular;