Lucas 1:62

62 Y pucháron por simaches al batu e chaboro, como camelaba que se le araquerase.
They were making signs
Strongs:
Word:
ἐνένευον
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Imperfect Active Indicative 3rd Plural
Grammar:
an ACTION that was happening - done by people or things being discussed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to signify
Tyndale
Word:
ἐννεύω
Transliteration:
enneuō
Gloss:
to signify
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἐν-νεύω [in LXX: Pro.6:13 10:10 (קָרַץ), Sir.27:22 A *;] to nod to, make a sign to: with dative of person(s), Luk.1:62. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἐννεύω
Transliteration:
enneuō
Gloss:
to signify
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ἐννεύω, nod or make signs to, ἐννεύει με φεύγειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐ. τινὶ τὸ τί ἂν θέλοι. ask him by signs what, [NT]
Strongs
Word:
ἐννεύω
Transliteration:
enneúō
Pronounciation:
en-nyoo'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to nod at, i.e. beckon or communicate by gesture; make signs; from g1722 (ἐν) and g3506 (νεύω);

then
Strongs:
Word:
δὲ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
and
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most freq. without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative);

to the
Strongs:
Word:
τῷ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Dative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a specific male person or thing that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
the
Conjoined:
»008:G3962
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

father
Strongs:
Word:
πατρὶ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Dative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
πατήρ
Transliteration:
patēr
Gloss:
father
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πατήρ, πατρός, -τρί, τέρα, [in LXX chiefly and very freq. for אָב;] a father; 1) prop, (a) of the male parent: Mat.2:22, Luk.1:17, Jhn.4:53; anarth, Heb.12:7 (M, Pr., 82 f.); pl, of both parents (cl.), Heb.11:23; οἱ π. τ. σαρκός, Heb.12:9; (b) of a forefather or ancestor (in cl. usually in pl; Hom, al.): Mat.3:9, Luk.1:73, Jhn.8:39, al; pl, Mat.23:30, 32 Luk.6:23, 26 Jhn.4:20, 1Co.10:1, al. 2) Metaph, (a) of an author, originator, or archetype (= αἴτιος, ἀρχηγός, etc; Pind, Plat, al.): Jhn.8:41-44, Rom.4:11, 12 16. (b) as a title of respect or honour, used of seniors, teachers and others in a position of responsible authority (Jdg.17:10, 2Ki.2:12, Pro.1:8, al.): Mat.23:9 Act.7:2 22:1, 1Jn.2:13. 3) Of God (as in cl. of Zeus) as Father; (a) of created things: τ. φώτων, Jas.1:17; (b) of all sentient beings: Eph.3:14, 15 Heb.12:9; (with) of men, esp. those in covenant relation with Him (freq in OT and later Jewish lit; see Dalman, Words, 184ff.): Mat.6:4, Luk.6:36, Jhn.4:21, Jas.3:9, al; ὁ π. ὁ ἐν (τ.) οὐρανοῖς, Mat.5:16, Mrk.11:25; ὁ π. ὁ οὐράνιος, Mat.6:14 15:13; esp. in the Epp, of Christians: Rom.8:15, 2Co.6:18, Gal.4:6, Eph.2:18 4:6, 1Jn.2:1; with genitive qual, τ. οἰκτιρμῶν, 2Co.1:3; τ. δοξῆς, Eph.1:17; (d) of Christ (Dalman, Words, 190 ff.); (α) by our Lord himself: ὁ π, Mat.11:25-27, Luk.10:2, 22 Jhn.5:20-23, al; ὁ π. μου, Mat.11:27, al; ὁ ἐν τ. οὐρανοῖς, Mat.7:11, al; ὁ οὐράνιος, Mat.15:13; vocat, Jhn.11:41 12:27, 28 17:1, 5, 11, 20, 25 (cf. Abbott, JG, 96 f.); (β) by Apostles: Jhn.1:14 (anarth; see M, Pr., l.with), Rom.15:6, 2Co.1:3 11:31, Eph.1:3, Col.1:3, Heb.1:5, 1Pe.1:3, Rev.1:6 (cf. Westc, Epp. Jo., 27-34). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πατήρ
Transliteration:
patēr
Gloss:
father
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
πᾰτήρ, ὁ, genitive and dative πατέρος, πατέρι in Epic dialect and Lyric poetry, Attic dialect πατρός, πατρί (which is also the commoner form in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; accusative always πατέρ; vocative πάτερ: plural πατέρες, πατέρας, πατέρων (πατρῶν only [Refs 8th c.BC+]; dative πατράσι [ᾰ] (cf. Sanskrit locative plural pitṛ[snull]u, no dative plural occurs in [Refs 8th c.BC+], late Epic dialect πατέρεσσι [Refs 4th c.AD+]:— father, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πατρὸς πατήρ grandfather,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ πρὸς πατρός by the father's side, [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; especially of God, the father of the Israelites, [LXX]; father of men, [NT]; father of Jesus Christ, [Refs] II) especially as epithet of Zeus, πατὴρ Ζεύς, π. Κρονίδης, π. ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ζεὺς π. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; π. Οὐρανιδᾶν Ζ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) respectful mode of addressing persons older than oneself, ξεὶνε πάτερ [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc; in addressing an elder brother, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] IV) metaphorically, father, author, ἀοιδᾶν π. εὐαίνητος Ὀρφεύς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Χρόνος ὁ πάντων π. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦ λόγου π. [Refs]; ὁ π. τῶν φώτων, i.e. God, the father of the stars, [NT]; οἱ π. τῶν ἀτόμων the authors of the atomic theory, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; of capital, τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκγόνους τόκους [Refs 5th c.BC+] V) title of a grade in the mysteries of Mithras, [Refs] VI) π. πατρίδος, = Latin pater patriae, [Refs 1st c.AD+] VII) in plural, VII.1) forefathers, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐξέτι πατρῶν from our fathers' time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] VII.2) parents, [Refs 1st c.BC+] VII.3) parentnation, opposed to colonists, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. (Cf. Sanskritpitár, Latin pater, etc.)
Strongs
Word:
πατήρ
Transliteration:
patḗr
Pronounciation:
pat-ayr'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a "father" (literally or figuratively, near or more remote); father, parent; apparently a primary word;

of him,
Strongs:
Word:
αὐτοῦ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun Genitive Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned male person or thing that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
of him
Conjoined:
«008:G3962
Tyndale
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
αὐτός, -ή, -ό, determinative pron., in late Gk. much more freq. than in cl. (WM, 178f; Jannaris, HGG, §1399). 1) Emphatic (so always in nom. exc. when preceded by the art, see infr, iii); (1) self (ipse), expressing opposition, distinction, exclusion, etc, αὐ. ἐκχυθήσεται, Luk.5:37; αὐ. ἐγινώσκεν, Jhn.2:25; αὐ.ὑμεῖς, Jhn.3:28; καὶ αὐ. ἐγώ, Rom.15:14; αὐ. Ἰησοῦς, Jhn.2:24; αὐ. καὶ οἱ μετ᾽ αὐτοῦ, Mrk.2:25; ὑμεῖς αὐ, Mrk.6:31; esp. (as freq in cl.) αὐ. ὁ, Mat.3:4, Mrk.6:17, Jhn.16:27, 1Th.3:11, al; in late Gk, sometimes weakened, ἐν αὐτῇ τ. ὥρᾳ, in that hour, Luk.10:21 (M, Pr., 91; MM, see word); (2) emphatic, he, she, it (M, Pr., 86; Bl, §48, 1, 2, 7), Mat.1:21, 12:50, Luk.6:35, al; pointing to some one as master (cl.), Mat.8:24, Mrk.4:38, al; αὐ, καὶ αὐ. = οὗτος, ὁ δε (BL, §48, 1), Mat.14:2, Mrk.14:15, 44, Luk.1:22, 2:28, al. 2) In oblique cases (cl.), for the simple pron. of 3rd of person(s), he, she, it, Mat.7:9, 10:12, 26:44, al; with ptcp. in genitive absol, Mat.9:18, Mrk.13:1, al. (for irreg. constructions, V. Bl, §74, 5); pleonastically after the relative (cf. Heb. אֲשֶׁר לוֹ; WM, 184ff; Bl, §50, 4; MM, see word), Mrk.7:25, Rev.3:8, 7:2, al; in constr. ad sensum, without proper subject expressly indicated, Mat.4:23, Act.8:5, 2Co.2:13, al; genitive αὐτοῦ = ἐκείνου, Rom.11:11, 1Th.2:19, Tit.3:5, Heb.2:4. 3) ὁ, ἡ, τὸ αὐ, the same: Heb.1:12, 13:8; τὸ αὐ, ποιεῖν, Mat.5:46, 47, al; φρονεῖν, Rom.12:16, 15:5, Php.2:2, al; τὰ αὐ, Act.15:27, Rom.2:1, al; κατὰ τὸ (τὰ) αὐ. (MM, see word), Act.14:1, Luk.6:23, al; ἐπὶ τὸ αὐ, together (MM, see word), Mat.22:34, Act.1:15, al; ἓν κ. τὸ αὐ, 1Co.11:5, 12:11; with dative (cl.), 1Co.11:5; with a noun, λόγος, Mrk.14:39; μέτρος, Php.1:30; πνεῦμα, 1Co.12:4. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
αὐτός (Cretan dialect ἀϝτός [Refs] (also αὐτόν[Refs], reflexive pronoun, self:—in oblique cases used for the personal pronoun, him, her, it:—with Article, ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό (also ταὐτόν), etc, the very one, the same. I) self, myself, thyself, etc, accusative to the person of the Verb: frequently joined with ἐγώ, σύ, etc. (see. below 10), I.1) one's true self, the soul, not the body, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; reversely, body, not soul, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; oneself, as opposed to others who are less prominent, as king to subject, [Refs]; man to wife and children, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; warrior to horses, [Refs 8th c.BC+], or to weapons, [Refs]; shepherd to herd, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; seamen to ships, [Refs]: generally, whole to parts,[Refs 5th c.BC+]: absolutely, the Master, as in the [Refs 4th c.BC+] Latin Ipse dixit; so τίς οὗτος;— Αὐτός, i.e. Socrates, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀναβόησον Αὐτόν[Refs]the Master, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the result will show, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially αὐτὸ δείξει[Refs 5th c.BC+]; of things, the very, ὑπὸ λόφον αὐτόν, i.e. just, exactly under, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρὸς αὐταῖς ταῖς θύραις close by the door, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ δέον the very thing needed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ περίορθρον the point of dawn, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ τὰ ἐναντία the very opposite, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even, οὔ μοι μέλει ἄλγος οὔτ᾽ αὐτῆς Ἑκάβης[Refs 8th c.BC+] —In these senses αὐτός in Prose either precedes both the _Article_ and substantive, or follows both, e.g. αὐτὸς ὁ υἱός or ὁ υἱὸς αὐτός. The Article is sometimes omitted with proper names, or Nouns denoting individuals, αὐτὸς Μένων[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) of oneself, of one's own accord, ἀλλά τις αὐ. ἴτω[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also, in person, τῶν πραγμάτων ὑμῖν. αὐτοῖς ἀντιληπτέον[Refs 4th c.BC+] I.3) by oneself or itself, alone, αὐτός περ ἐών although alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς ἐγείναο παῖδ᾽, i.e. without a mother,[Refs 8th c.BC+]by himself, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ γάρ ἐσμεν we are by ourselves, i.e. among friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ γὰρ ἔστιν ταῦτα these and no others, [Refs 5th c.BC+] himself alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς μόνος, see at {μόνος} II; αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτόν, see at {ἑαυτοῦ}. I.4) in Philosophy, by or in itself, of an abstract concept or idea, δίκαιον αὐτό[Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently in this sense, attached to Nouns of all genders, οὐκ αὐτὸ δικαιοσύνην ἐπαινοῦντες ἀλλὰ τὰς ἀπ᾽ αὐτῆς εὐδοκιμήσεις[Refs 5th c.BC+]; more fully, εἰ αὐτὸ τοῦτο πατέρα ἠρώτων, ἆρα ὁ πατήρ ἐστι πατήρ τινος, ἢ ο; [Refs]; ἀδελφός, αὐτὸ τοῦτο ὅπερ ἔστιν the ideal, abstract brother, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; less frequently agreeing with the substantive, ἵνα αὐτὴ δικαιοσύνη πρὸς ἀδικίαν αὐτὴν κριθείη[Refs 5th c.BC+]its very self, [Refs] I.5) in dative with substantive, in one, together, ἀνόρουσεν αὐτῇ σὺν φόρμιγγι he sprang up lyre in hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτῇ σὺν πήληκι κάρη helmet and all,[Refs 8th c.BC+] men and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοῖσι συμμάχοισι allies and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.6) added to ordinal Numbers, e.g. πέμπτος αὐτός himself the fifth, i. e. himself with four others, [NT+5th c.BC+] I.7) frequently coupled with οὗτος, τοῦτ᾽ αὐτό ἐστι τὸ ζητηθέν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταῦτα ἥκω αὐτὰ ἵνα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.8) καὶ αὐτός himself too, [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.9) repeated in apodosi for emphasis, αὐτὸς ἐπαγγειλάμενος σώσειν. αὐτὸς ἀπώλεσεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10) in connexion with the person. pronoun, ἐγὼν αὐτός[Refs 8th c.BC+]; followed by an enclitic pronoun, αὐτόν μιν[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.b) with person. pronoun omitted, αὐτός. ἧσθαι λιλαίομαι, for ἐγὼ αὐτός, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸν ἐλέησον, for ἐμὲ αὐτόν,[Refs 8th c.BC+] is simply a strengthened form of ο; and so in Attic dialect, when σὲ αὐτόν, ἐμοὶ αὐτῷ, etc, are read divisim, they are emphatic, not reflexive; in this case αὐτός generally precedes the person. pronoun,[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.c) with the reflexive ἑαυτοῦ, αὑτοῦ, etc, to add force and definiteness, αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτοῦ[Refs 4th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ ὑφ᾽ αὑτῶν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; sometimes between the Article and reflexive pronoun, τοῖς αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ πήμασιν βαρύνεται[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.d) αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶν with possessive pronoun, πατρὸς κλέος ἠδ᾽ ἐμὸν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοῖς οἷσιν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.e) αὐτὸς ἑαυτοῦ with comparative and superlative adjective, αὐτὸς ἑωυτοῦ ῥέει πολλῷ ὑποδεέστερος[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.11) αὐτός for ὁ αὐτός, the same, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in later Prose, αὐταῖς ταῖς ἡμέραις[NT+2nd c.AD+] I.12) comparative αὐτότερος[Refs 5th c.BC+]: superlative αὐτότατος his very self, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. adverb, comparative αὐτοτέρως[Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) he, she, it, for the simple pronoun of 3 person, only in oblique cases (except in later Gk, [NT], and rarely first in a sentence, [NT+5th c.BC+]: rare in Epic dialect, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and mostly emphatic,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in Prose, to recall a Noun used earlier in the sentence, ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν βασιλέα. οὐκ οἶδα ὅ τι δεῖ αὐτὸν ὀμόσαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; after a Relative, ὅς κε θεοῖς ἐπιπείθηται. ἔκλυον αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially where a second Verb requires a change of case in the pronoun, οἳ ἂν ἐξελεγχθῶσι. ὡς προδότας αὐτοὺς ὄντας τιμωρηθῆναι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; later, pleonastically after a Relative, ὧν ὁ μὲν αὐτῶν[NT+5th c.BC+] III) with Article ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό, and Attic dialect contraction αὑτός, αὑτή, ταὐτό and ταὐτόν (as required by the metre,[Refs 5th c.BC+] plural neuter ταὐτ; Ionic dialect ὡυτός, τὠυτό:—the very one, the same, rare in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with dative, to denote sameness or agreement, especially in Prose, τὠυτὸ ἂν ὑμῖν ἐπρήσσομεν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ αὐτὸς τῷ λίθῳ the same as the stone, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ταὐτῷ εἶναί τινι to be in the place with, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσίεσθαί τινα ἐς ταὐτὸ ἑαυτῷ to have a person meet one,[Refs 5th c.BC+]face to face, [Refs 4th c.AD+] III.2) in later Greek, the said, the above-named, Ἡρώδης ὁ αὐ.[Refs 3rd c.BC+] IV) Adverbial phrases: IV.1) αὐτὸ μόνον simply, merely, [Refs 1st c.AD+] IV.2) αὐτό as adverb, ={ἄρτι}, [Refs] IV.3) αὐτὸ τοῦτο as adverb, [NT+2nd c.BC+] IV.4) with Preps, ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτό added together, making a total, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; κατὰ τὸ αὐτό together, at the same time,[NT], etc; but κατ᾽ αὐτό just then, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) In Compos: V.1) of or by oneself, self-, as in αὐτοδίδακτος, αὐτογνώμων, αὐτόματος: and so, independently, as in αὐτοκράτωρ, αὐτόνομος. V.2) hence, as a second self, very, bodily, as with proper names, Αὐτοθαΐς. V.3) in the abstract, the ideal, see above[Refs] V.4) precisely, as in αὐτόδεκα. V.5) rarely with reflexive sense of ἀλλήλων, as in αὐτοκτονέω. V.6) in one piece with, together with, as in αὐτόκωπος, αὐτοχείλης, αὐτόπρεμνος, αὐτόρριζος. V.7) by itself: hence, only, as in αὐτόξυλος, αὐτόποκος.—For αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶς, etc, see the respective Arts.
Strongs
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autós
Pronounciation:
ow-tos'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative g1438 (ἑαυτοῦ)) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons; her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which; from the particle (perhaps akin to the base of g109 (ἀήρ) through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward);

the
Strongs:
Word:
τὸ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC neuter person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»018:G2309
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

what
Strongs:
Word:
τί
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Interrogative pronoun Accusative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a question referring to a neuter person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
which?
Conjoined:
»018:G2309
Tyndale
Word:
τίς
Transliteration:
tis
Gloss:
which?
Morphhology:
Greek, Interogative
Definition:
τίς, neut, τί, genitive, τίνος, interrog. pron., [in LXX for מָה,מִי;] in masc. and fem, who, which, what?; in neut, which, what?, used both in direct and in indirect questions. I. I. As subst, 1) 1. masc, fem: τίς; who, what?, Mat.3:7 26:68; Mrk.11:28, Luk.9:9, al. mult; with genitive partit, Act.7:52, Heb.1:5, al; before ἐκ (= genitive partit.), Mat.6:27, Luk.14:28, Jhn.8:46; = ποῖος, Mrk.4:41 6:2, Luk.19:3, Act.17:19, al; = πότερος (M, Pr., 77), Mat.21:31 27:17, Luk.22:27, al; = ὅς or ὅστις (rare in cl; cf. Bl, §50, 5; M, Pr., 93), Act.13:25. 2) Neut: τί; what?, Mat.5:47 11:7, Mrk.10:3, al; χάριν τίνος, 1Jn.3:12; διὰ τί, Mat.9:11, al; εἰς τί, Mat.14:31, al; elliptically, ἵνα τί (sc. γένηται), why, Mat.9:5, al; τί οὖν, Rom.3:9 6:1, 15 1Co.14:15, al; τί γάρ, Rom.3:3, Phi 1:18; τί ἐμοὶ (ὑμῖν) καὶ σοί, see: ἔγω. II. As adj: who? what? which?, Mat.5:46, Luk.14:31, Jhn.2:18, al. III. As adv: = διὰ τι (τί ὅτι), why, Mat.6:28, Mrk.4:40, Luk.6:46, Jhn.18:23, al; in rhet. questions, = a negation, Mat.27:4, Jhn.21:22, 23 1Co.5:12 7:16, al. in exclamations (like Heb. מָה), how (2Ki.6:20, Psa.3:2, al.), Luk.12:49. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
τίς
Transliteration:
tis
Gloss:
which?
Morphhology:
Greek, Interogative
Definition:
τίς B) Interrog. pronoun τίς, Elean and Laconian dialect τίρ (which see), τί:—genitive Epic dialect and Ionic dialect τέο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Trag. and Attic dialect τοῦ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect, Trag, and Attic dialect τίνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; dative Ionic dialect τέῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; no dative in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Trag. and Attic dialect τῷ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect τίῳ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τίνι first in [NT+8th c.BC+]; genitive Epic dialect τέων [Refs 8th c.BC+], and as monosyllable [Refs]; Trag. and Attic dialect τίνων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; dative τίσι first in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect τέοισι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Aeolic dialect τίοισι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; Boeotian dialect τά [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Megarian dialect σά [Refs 5th c.BC+]: of the plural [Refs 8th c.BC+] with genitive τέω; ποῖος (what? which?) is sometimes preferred (especially in neuter plural) to the adjective τίς, e.g. τὰ ποῖα ταῦτα χρήματ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I) in direct questions, who? which? neuter what? which? ὦ ξεῖνοι, τίνες ἐστ; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τίς ἀχώ, τίς ὀδμὰ προσέπτα μ᾽ ἀφεγγή; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; properly at the beginning of the sentence; but this position may be varied, B.I.a) for grammatical reasons, as between the Article and participle or noun, τοὺς τί ποιοῦντας τὸ ὄνομα τοῦτο ἀποκαλοῦσι; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς περὶ τί πειθοῦς ἡ ῥητορική ἐστιν τέχν; [Refs]; ὁ σοφιστὴς τῶν τί σοφῶν ἐστι; [Refs] B.I.b) for emphasis, ἃ δ᾽ ἐννέπεις, κλύουσα τοῦ λέγει; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πόλις τε ἀφισταμένη τίς πω. τούτῳ ἐπεχείρησ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially when the Verb begins the sentence, δράσεις δὲ δὴ τ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἦλθες δὲ κατὰ τ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; διαφέρει δὲ τ; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; and of things or conditions, τί is frequently with the genitive singular, of all genders, πρὸς τί χρεία; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐλπίδων ἐς τ; [Refs] B.I.2) sometimes as the predicate, τίς ὀνομάζετα; what is he named? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so also may be explained the union of τίς with a demonstrative or possessive pronoun, or with a Noun preceded by the Article, τί τοῦτ᾽ ἔλεξα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ἐστι τουτ; τίς ὁ τρόπος τοῦ τάγματο; [Refs]; also with pronoun in plural, τί ταῦτ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί γὰρ τάδ᾽ ἐστί; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ποτ᾽ ἐστίν, ἂ διανοούμεθ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ποτ᾽ ἐστὶ ταῦτα[Refs]; so τί is used as predicate of a masculine or feminine subject, τί νιν προσείπ; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τί σοι φαίνεται ὁ νεανίσκο; [Refs 5th c.BC+] —also τίς δ᾽ ὅδε Ναυσικάᾳ ἕπεται; who is this that follows N? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τίς δ᾽ οὗτος ἔρχεα; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; and in the reverse order, τήνδε τίνα λεύσσω; who is this I see? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίνι οὖν τοιούτῳ φίλους ἂν θηρῴη; with what means of such kind? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί τοσοῦτον νομίζοντες ἠδικῆσθα; [Refs]; τί με τὸ δεινὸν ἐργάσ; what is the dreadful thing which? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίν᾽ ὄψιν σὴν προσδέρκομα; what face is this I see of thine? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παρὰ τίνας τοὺς ὑμᾶ; who are 'you' to whom [I am to come]? [Refs 5th c.BC+] —the _Article_ is exceptionally added to τίς, when it leads up to a word which requires the Article, ληφθήσει. Πανήμου εἰκάδι· καὶ Λῴου τῇ--τίν; τῇ δεκάτῃ on the twentieth of the month Panemus and of Loüs on the --what day? the tenth, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] —in Comedy texts also τὸ τί; what is that? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοῦ τίνος χάρι; [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; and with plural Article, τὰ τ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) with properly names treated as appellatives (see. τις indefinite [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίς σε Θηρικλῆς ποτε ἔτευξ; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τίς. Χίμαιρα πύρπνοο; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.4) τίς ἂν θεῶν. δοί; like{πῶς ἄν}, would that some one. , [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) a question with τίς often amounts to a strong negation, τῶν δ᾽ ἄλλων τίς κεν οὐνόματ᾽ εἴπο; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τίς ἂν ἐξεύροι ποτ᾽ ἄμεινο; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίνες ἂν δικαιότερον. μισοῖντ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.6) sometimes two questions are asked in one clause by different cases of τί; ἡ τίσιν τί ἀποδιδοῦσα τέχνη δικαιοσύνη ἂν καλοῖτ; [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.7) τίς with Particles:—τίς γά; why who? who possibly? τίς γάρ σε θεῶν. ἧκε; [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.7.b) τίς δ; ὦ κοῦραι, τίς δ᾽ ὔμμιν. πωλεῖτα; [Refs] B.I.7.c) τίς δ; who then? τίς δή κεν βροτὸς. ἅζοιτ᾽ ἀθανάτους [Refs 6th c.BC+]; τίς δῆτ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7.d) τίς ποτ; who in the world? who ever? τίς ποτ᾽ ὢν γενεὰν καὶ ποίαν τινὰ φύσιν ἔχω; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τίς δήποτ; [Refs] B.I.8) the usages of the neuter τ; are very various: B.I.8.a) τ; alone, as a simple question, what? τί γά; [Refs 4th c.BC+]:—on ὅτι τ; ὅτι τί δ; ὅτι δὴ τ; see at {ὅτι} [Refs 5th c.BC+]; on ὡς τ; see {ὡς} F.1. B.I.8.b) τί τοῦτ; τί ταῦτ; see above 2. B.I.8.c) τί μο; τί σο; what is it to me? to thee? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with genitive, τί μοι ἔριδος καὶ ἀρωγῆ; what have I to do with? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τί δέ σοι ταῦτ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] (where the answerer repeats the question in indirect form, ὅ τί μοι τοῦτ᾽ ἔστι;); ἀλλὰ δὴ τί τοῦτ᾽ ἐμο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τί ἐμοὶ καὶ σο; what have I to do with thee? [LXX+2nd c.AD+]; τί σοὶ καὶ εἰρήν; [LXX]; τί πρὸσσ; [NT+2nd c.AD+]; σοὶ δὲ καὶ τούτοισι τοῖσι πρήγμασι τί ἐστ; what have you to do with these matters? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί τῷ νόμῳ καὶ τῇ βασάν; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; or with infinitive, τί γάρ μοι τοὺς ἔξω κρίνει; [NT] B.I.8.d) τίμαθώ; τί παθώ; see at {μανθάνω} see, πάσχω [Refs] B.I.8.e) τ; also often stands absolutely as adverb how? why? wherefore? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so too in Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δόμων γὰρ ζῶσι τῶνδε δεσπόται. Answ. τί ζῶσι; how do you mean ζῶσι ζῶσι forsooth! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κιθαιρὼν--Answ. τί Κιθαιρώ; what aboutK? [Refs]; compare τίη. B.I.8.f) τί with Particles: -τί γά; why not? how else? and so it came to mean of course, no doubt, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; used in affirmative answers, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; to introduce an argument, [Refs 4th c.BC+] —τί δαί; see at {δαί}:—τί δ; serving to pass on quickly to a fresh point, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δέ, εἰ; but what, if? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἄν, εἰ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἢν; [Refs]; τί δέ, εἰ μὴ; what else but? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so τί δὲ δ; τί δ; τί δή ποτ; why ever? why in the world? what do you mean? [Refs 5th c.BC+] —so also τί δῆτα; how, pray? τί δῆτ᾽ ἄν, εἰ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] — (τί μή; falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τί μήν; i.e. yes certainly, much like{τί γάρ}; [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τί μὴν οὔ; in reply to a question, [Refs] —τί νυ; why now? [Refs 8th c.BC+] —τί δ᾽ οὔ; parenthetic, why not? as an affirmative answer, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί οὐ καλοῦμε; i.e. let us call, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί οὐ βαδίζομε; etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τί οὖν; how so? making an objection, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τί οὖν οὐκ ἐρωτᾷ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τί ποτε; see at {τίπτε}; B.I.8.g) with Conjunctions following:—τί ὅτι; why is it that? [NT+5th c.BC+]; see at {ἵνα} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.8.h) with Preps:—διὰ τ; wherefore? [Refs 5th c.BC+] —ἐκ τίνος; from what cause? [Refs 5th c.BC+] —ἐς τί; to what point? how long? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but also, to what end? [Refs 5th c.BC+] —κατὰ τί; for what purpose? [Refs 5th c.BC+] —πρὸς τί; wherefore? [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) τίς is sometimes used for ὅστις in indirect questions, εἰρώτα δὴ ἔπειτα τίς εἴη καὶ πόθεν ἔλθοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἔχω τί φῶ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in later Gr, where ὅστις is very rare, εἰς τὸ λογιστήριον γράφων. τί ὀφείλεται [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; οὐθεὶς ἐσήμηνεν παρὰ τί ἂν τοῖς προστεταγμένοις. οὐ κατηκολούθησαν nobody indicated why they should not have obeyed orders, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; ὅστις and τίς are sometimes combined, ὡς πύθοιθ᾽ ὅ τι δρῶν ἢ τί φωνῶν ῥυσαίμην [Refs 5th c.BC+] —later with infinitive, τί πράττειν οὐκ ἔχω I do not know what to do, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.b) sometimes not in indirect questions, whoever, whatever, αἰτοῦ τί χρῄζεις ἕν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταῦτα οὐκ ἀπέστελλον πάντα, ἀλλ᾽ ἐκλεγόμενοι τίνων αἱ τιμαὶ ἐπετέταντο whatever things had risen in price, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τίνα δ᾽ ἁ Κύπρις οὐκ ἐφίλησεν whomsoever K. has not loved, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; τίνι ἡ τύχη δίδωσι, λαβέτω Antiochusap.[Refs 3rd c.BC+], see above[Refs 4th c.BC+]; τίς σοφός, αὐτῷ προσκολλήθητι [LXX+NT]; τίς σοφίῃ πάντων πρῶτος, τούτου τρίποδ᾽ αὐδῶ Oracle texts cited in [Refs 1st c.BC+] Cobet from [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in other places, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.c) τίς ={ὅστις} after a negative, μή τίς ἐστιν ἐν ὑμῖν ἀνὴρ ἢ γυνὴ, τίνος ἡ διάνοια ἐξέκλινεν κτλ; [LXX] B.II.d) = {ὅς} or ὅσπερ, τέων. Ζεὺς ἐπὶ σαλπίγγων ἱρὰ βοῇ δέχεται Κᾶρες ὁμοῦ Λελέγεσσι [Refs 3rd c.BC+], compare 5.2,8; τίνας ἱερεωσύνας εἶχον ἐπενεγύων [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; τίνα με ὑπονοεῖτε εἶναι, οὐκ εἰμὶ ἐγώ [NT]; τίς ἔζησεν ἔτη β who lived, [Refs]; εὗρον γεωργόν, τίς αὐτὰ ἑλκύσῃ [Refs 2nd c.AD+] B.II.2) τί; τ; in direct or indirect questions may be construed with a participle, σὺ δὲ τίς ὢν ταῦτα λέγει; being who, i.e. who are you that? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καταμεμάθηκας. τοὺς τί ποιοῦντας τὸ ὄνομα τοῦτο ἀποκαλοῦσ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; νῦν δ᾽ ἐπειδὴ τίνος τέχνης ἐπιστήμων ἐστί, τίνα ἂν καλοῦντες αὐτὸν ὀρθῶς καλοῖμε; [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) = {πότερος}; [NT+5th c.BC+] B.IV) τί as exclamatory adverb, how. ! τί ὡραιώθησαν σιαγόνες σου ὡς τρυγόνες [LXX]; τί θέλω how I wish! [NT]; τί στενή variant in [NT] C) Prosody: τις and τίς keep ῐ in all cases (digamma operates in [Refs 8th c.BC+] C.II) τί was never elided; but hiatus is allowed after τί in Epic dialect τί ἢ (see. τίη), also in Comedy texts, as τί ο; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί οὖ; [Refs]; τί ἔστ; [Refs]; τί, ὦ πάτε; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί οὖ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί εἶπα; [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
τίς
Transliteration:
tís
Pronounciation:
tis
Language:
Greek
Definition:
an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what (in direct or indirect questions); every man, how (much), + no(-ne, thing), what (manner, thing), where (-by, -fore, -of, -unto, - with, -withal), whether, which, who(-m, -se), why; probably emphatic of g5100 (τὶς);

maybe
Strongs:
Word:
ἂν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Particle or Disjunctive Particle
Grammar:
introducing an alternative
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
if
Tyndale
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek, Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, conditional particle, which cannot usually be separately translated in English, its force depending on the constructions which contain it (see further, LS, see word; WM, §xlii; M, Pr., 165 ff; MM, VGT, see word). 1) In apodosis, (i) with indic, impf. or aor, expressing what would be or would have been if (εἰ with impf, aor. or plpf.) some condition were or had been fulfilled: Luk.7:39 17:6, Jhn.5:46, Gal.1:10, Mat.12:7 24:43, 1Co.2:8, Act.18:14, 1Jn.2:19, al. The protasis is sometimes understood (as also in cl.): Mat.25:27, Luk.19:23. In hypothetical sentences, expressing unreality, ἄν (as often in late writers, more rarely in cl.) is omitted: Jhn.8:39 15:24 19:11, Rom.7:7, Gal.4:15; (ii) with opt, inf, ptcp. (cl; see LS, see word; M, Int., §275; M, Pr., 167:4). 2) In combination with conditional, relative, temporal, and final words; (i) as in cl, with subj, (a) in protasis with εἰ, in Attic contr. ἐάν, which see; (b) in conditional, relative, and temporal clauses (coalescing with ὅτε, ἐπεί, etc; see: ὅταν, ἐπάν, etc.), ever, soever; (α) with pres, ἡνίκα, 2Co.3:15; ὃς ἄν, Rom.9:15 (LXX) 16:2, al; ὅσοι ἄν, Luk.9:5; ὡς ἄν, Rom.15:24 (M, Pr., 167); (β) with aor, ὃς ἄν, Mat.5:21, 22, 31; ἕως ἄν, until, Mat.2:13, Mrk.6:10, al; ὡς ἄν, as soon as (M, Pr., 167), 1Co.11:34, Php.2:23. On the freq. use of ἐάν for ἄν with the foregoing words, see: ἐάν; (ii) in late Gk, when some actual fact is spoken of, with indic: ὅταν (which see); ὅπου ἄν, Mrk.6:56 (M, Pr., 168); καθότι ἄν, Act.2:45 4:35; ὡς ἄν, 1Co.12:2. 3) in iterative construction, with impf. and aor. indic. (M, Pr., 167): Act.2:45 4:35, 1Co.12:2. 4) with optative, giving a potential sense to a question or wish: Act.8:31 26:29. 5) Elliptical constructions: εἰ μή τι ἄν (M, Pr., 169), 1Co.7:5; ὡς ἄν, with inf, as it were (op. cit. 167), 2Co.10:9. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
an
Gloss:
if
Morphhology:
Greek, Conditional
Definition:
ἄν, [ᾰ], Epic dialect, Lyric poetry, Ionic dialect, [Refs 4th c.AD+], Attic dialect; also κεν) Epic dialect, Aeolic dialect, Thess, κᾱ Doric dialect, Boeotian dialect, El; the two combined in Epic dialect (below [Refs 4th c.BC+], εἰκ ἄν[Refs 4th c.BC+]:—modal Particle used with Verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] κε is four times as common as ἄν, in Lyric poetry about equally common. No clear distinction can be traced, but κε as an enclitic is somewhat less emphatic; ἄν is preferred by [Refs 8th c.BC+] in negative clauses, κε (ν) with the relative. A) In Simple Sentences, and in the Apodosis of Compound Sentences; here ἄν belongs to the Verb, and denotes that the assertion made by the Verb is dependent on a condition, expressed or implied: thus ἦλθεν he came, ἦλθεν ἄν he would have come (under conditions, which may or may not be defined), and so he might have come; ἔλθοι may he come, ἔλθοι ἄν he would come (under certain conditions), and so he might come. A.I) WITH INDICATIVE: A.I.1) with historical tenses, generally imperfect and aorist, less frequently pluperfect, never perfect, see below, A.I.1.a) most frequently in apodosis of conditional sentences, with protasis implying nonfulfilment of a past or present condition, and apodosis expressing what would be or would have been the case if the condition were or had been fulfilled. The imperfect with ἄν refers to continued action, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in past time, except perhaps καί κε θάμ᾽ ἐνθάδ᾽ ἐόντες ἐμισγόμεθ᾽[Refs 8th c.BC+]; later also in present time, first in [Refs 6th c.BC+]; πολὺ ἂν θαυμαστότερον ἦν, εἰ ἐτιμῶντο it would be far more strange if they were honoured, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν νήσων ἐκράτει, εἰ μή τι καὶ ναυτικὸν εἶχεν he would not have been master of islands if he had not had also some naval power, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. The aorist strictly refers only to past time, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰ τότε ταύτην ἔσχε τὴν γνώμην, οὐδὲν ἂν ὧν νυνὶ πεποίηκεν ἔπραξεν if he had then come to this opinion, he would have accomplished nothing of what he has now done, [Refs 4th c.BC+], but is used idiomatically with Verbs of saying, answering, etc, as we say I should have said, εἰ μὴ πατὴρ ἦσθ᾽, εἶπον ἄν σ᾽ οὐκ εὖ φρονεῖν[Refs 5th c.BC+]pluperfect refers to completed actions, as ὃ εἰ ἀπεκρίνω, ἱκανῶς ἂν ἤδη παρὰ σοῦ τὴν ὁσιότητα ἐμεμαθήκη I should have already learnt,[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.b) the protasis is frequently understood: ὑπό κεν ταλασίφρονά περ δέος εἷλεν fear would have seized even the stout-hearted (had he heard the sound), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸ γὰρ ἔρυμα τῷ στρατοπέδῳ οὐκ ἂν ἐτειχίσαντο they would not have built the wall (if they had not won a battle), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πολλοῦ γὰρ ἂν ἦν ἄξια for (if that were so) they would be worth much, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν ὅ τι ἂν ἐποιεῖτε for there was nothing which you could have done, i. e. would have done (if you had tried), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.I.1.c) with no definite protasis understood, to express what would have been likely to happen, or might have happened in past time: ἢ γάρ μιν ζωόν γε κιχήσεαι, ἤ κεν Ὀρέστης κτεῖνεν ὑποφθάμενος for either you will find him alive, or else Orestes may already have killed him before you, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ θεασάμενος πᾶς ἄν τις ἀνὴρ ἠράσθη δάϊος εἶναι every man who saw this (the 'Seven against Thebes') would have longed to be a warrior, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially with τάχα, which see, ἀλλ᾽ ἦλθε μὲν δὴ τοῦτο τοὔνειδος τάχ᾽ ἂν ὀργῇ βιασθὲν μᾶλλον ἢ γνώμῃ φρενῶν, i. e. it might perhaps have come, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τάχα ἂν δὲ καὶ ἄλλως πως ἐσπλεύσαντες (i.e. διέβησαν) and they might also perhaps have crossed by sea (to Sicily) in some other way, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.1.d) ἄν is frequently omitted in apodosi with Verbs expressing obligation, propriety, or possibility, as ἔδει, ἐχρῆν, εἰκὸς ἦν, etc, and sometimes for rhetorical effect, εἰ μὴ. ᾖσμεν, φόβον παρέσχεν it had caused (for it would have caused) fear, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2) with future indicative: A.I.2.a) frequently in Epic dialect, usually with κεν, rarely ἄν, [Refs 8th c.BC+] and he will likely be angry to whom-soever I shall come, [Refs]; καί κέ τις ὧδ᾽ ἐρέει and in that case men will say,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Lyric poetry, μαθὼν δέ τις ἂν ἐρεῖ[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2.b) rarely in codices of Attic dialect Prose writers, σαφὲς ἂν καταστήσετε[Refs 5th c.BC+]future infinitive and participle see below A.II) WITH SUBJUNCTIVE, only in Epic dialect, the meaning being the same as with the future indicative [Refs]I will take her myself, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πείθευ, ἐγὼ δέ κέ τοι εἰδέω χάριν obey and if so I will be grateful, [Refs]; also with other persons, giving emphasis to the future, οὐκ ἄν τοι χραίσμῃ κίθαρις[Refs] A.III) WITH OPTATIVE (never future, rarely perfect πῶς ἂν λελήθοι [με]; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.a) in apodosis of conditional sentences, after protasis in optative with εἰ or some other conditional or relative word, expressing a future condition: ἀλλ᾽ εἴ μοί τι πίθοιο, τό κεν πολὺ κέρδιον εἴη[Refs 8th c.BC+] present and aorist optative with κε or ἄν are sometimes used like imperfect and aorist indicative with ἄν in Attic, with either regular indicative or another optative in the protasis: καί νύ κεν ἔνθ᾽ ἀπόλοιτο. εἰ μὴ. νόησε κτλ, i. e. he would have perished, had she not perceived, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ νῦν ἐπὶ ἄλλῳ ἀεθλεύοιμεν, ἦ τ᾽ ἂν ἐγὼ. κλισίηνδε φεροίμην if we were now contending in another's honour, I should now carry, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.b) with protasis in present or future, the optative with ἄν in apodosi takes a simply future sense: φρούριον δ᾽ εἰ ποιήσονται, τῆς μὲν γῆς βλάπτοιεν ἄν τι μέρος they might perhaps damage, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.c) with protasis understood: φεύγωμεν· ἔτι γάρ κεν ἀλύξαιμεν κακὸν ἦμαρ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὔτε ἐσθίουσι πλείω ἢ δύνανται φέρειν· διαρραγεῖεν γὰρ ἄν for (if they should do so) they would burst, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν δ᾽ οὔ κε δύ᾽ ἀνέρε. ἀπ᾽ οὔδεος ὀχλίσσειαν two men could not heave the stone from the ground, i. e. would not, if they should try, [Refs 8th c.BC+] sometimes with reference to past time, Τυδεΐδην οὐκ ἂν γνοίης ποτέροισι μετείη[Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III.d) with no definite protasis implied, in potential sense: ἡδέως δ᾽ ἂν ἐροίμην Λεπτίνην but I would gladly ask Leptines, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; βουλοίμην ἄν I should like, Latin velim (but ἐβουλόμην ἄν I should wish, if it were of any avail, vellem); ποῖ οὖν τραποίμεθ᾽ ἄ; which way then can we turn? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἂν μεθείμην τοῦ θρόνου I will not give up the throne, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; idiomatically, referring to the past, αὗται δὲ οὐκ ἂν πολλαὶ εἶεν but these would not (on investigation) prove to be many, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴησαν δ᾽ ἂν οὗτοι Κρῆτες these would be (i. e. would have been) Cretans, [Refs 5th c.BC+] i.e. it would not prove to be, etc. (for, it is not, etc.), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.e) in questions, expressing a wish: τίς ἂν θεῶν. δοί;[Refs 5th c.BC+] as a mild command, exhortation, or entreaty, τλαίης κεν Μενελάῳ ἐπιπροέμεν ταχὺν ἰόν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; σὺ μὲν κομίζοις ἂν σεαυτὸν ᾗ θέλεις you may take yourself off (milder than κόμιζε σεαυτόν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χωροῖς ἂν εἴσω you may go in, [Refs]; φράζοις ἄν, λέγοις ἄν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.f) in a protasis which is also an apodosis: εἴπερ ἄλλῳ τῳ ἀνθρώπων πειθοίμην ἄν, καὶ σοὶ πείθομαι if I would trust any (other) man (if he gave me his word), I trust you, [Refs]; εἰ μὴ ποιήσαιτ᾽ ἂν τοῦτο if you would not do this (if you could), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.g) rarely omitted with optative in apodosis: ῥεῖα θεός γ᾽ ἐθέλων καὶ τηλόθεν ἄνδρα σαώσαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in Trag, θᾶσσον ἢ λέγοι τις[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.h) ἄν with future optative is probably always corrupt (compare [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἰδὼς ὅτι οὐδέν᾽ ἂν καταλήψοιτο (οὐδένα Bekk.) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV) WITH infinitive and participle (sometimes adjective equivalent to participle, τῶν δυνατῶν ἂν κρῖναι[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1) present infinitive or participle: A.IV.1.a) representing imperfect indicative, οἴεσθε τὸν πατέρα. οὐκ ἂν φυλάττει; do you think he would not have kept them safe? (οὐκ ἂν ἐφύλαττεν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδυνάτων ἂν ὄντων [ὑμῶν] ἐπιβοηθεῖν when you would have been unable, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.1.b) representing present optative, πόλλ᾽ ἂν ἔχων (representing ἔχοιμ᾽ ἄν) ἕτερ᾽ εἰπεῖν παραλείπω[Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2) aorist infinitive or participle: A.IV.2.a) representing aorist indicative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγεῖσθ᾽ αὐτὸν κἂν ἐπιδραμεῖ; do you not think he would even have run thither? (καὶ ἐπέδραμεν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἴσμεν ὑμᾶς ἀναγκασθέντας ἄν we know you would have been compelled, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ῥᾳδίως ἂν ἀφεθείς when he might easily have been acquitted, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.2.b) representing aorist optative, οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατῆσαι αὐτοὺς τῆς γῆς ἡγοῦμαι I think they would not even be masters of the land (οὐδ᾽ ἂν κρατήσειαν), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁρῶν ῥᾳδίως ἂν αὐτὸ ληφθέν (ληφθείη ἄν) [Refs]; οὔτε ὄντα οὔτε ἂν γενόμενα, i.e. things which are not and never could happen (ἃ οὔτε ἂν γένοιτο), [Refs] A.IV.3) perfect infinitive or participle representing: A.IV.3.a) pluperfect indicative, πάντα ταῦθ᾽ ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων ἂν ἑαλωκέναι (φήσειεν ἄν) he would say that all these would have been destroyed by the barbarians (ἑαλώκη ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.IV.3.b) perfect optative, οὐκ ἂν ἡγοῦμαι αὐτοὺς δίκην ἀξίαν δεδωκέναι, εἰ. καταψηφίσαισθε I do not believe they would (then) have suffered (δεδωκότες ἂν εἶεν) punishment enough, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.IV.4) future infinitive or participle, never in Epic dialect, and probably always corrupt in Attic dialect, νομίζων μέγιστον ἂν σφᾶς ὠφελήσειν (to be read -ῆσαι) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle is still more exceptional, ὡς ἐμοῦ οὐκ ἂν ποιήσοντος ἄλλα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; both are found in later Gk, νομίσαντες ἂν οἰκήσειν οὕτως ἄριστα[Refs 2nd c.BC+]; with participle, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B) IN DEPENDENT CLAUSE[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I) In the protasis of conditional sentences with εἰ, regularly with the subjunctive. In Attic εἰ ἄν is contracted into ἐάν, ἤν, or ἄν (ᾱ) (which see): [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἢν ἐγγὺς ἔλθῃ θάνατος, οὐδεὶς βούλεται θνῄσκειν if death (ever) come near, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in relative or temporal clauses with a conditional force; here ἄν coalesces with ὅτε, ὁπότε, ἐπεί, ἐπειδή, compare ὅταν, ὁπόταν, ἐπήν or ἐπάν (Ionic dialect ἐπεάν), ἐπειδάν: [Refs 8th c.BC+], ἐπήν, εὖτ᾽ ἄ; see also εἰσόκε (εἰς ὅ κε):—τάων ἥν κ᾽ ἐθέλωμι φίλην ποιήσομ᾽ ἄκοιτιν whomsoever of these I may wish, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὅταν δὴ μὴ σθένω, πεπαύσομαι when I shall have no strength, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐχθρὸς γάρ μοι κεῖνος. ὅς χ᾽ ἕτερον μὲν κεύθῃ ἐνὶ φρεσίν, ἄλλο δὲ εἴπῃ whoever conceals one thing in his mind and speaks another, [Refs 8th c.BC+]subjunctive in both the above constructions [Refs] without ἄ; also Trag. and Comedy texts, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μέχρι and πρίν occasionally take subjunctive without ἄν in prose, e.g. [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μέχρι οὗ), [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) in final clauses introduced by relative adverbs, as ὡς, ὅπως (of Manner), ἵνα (of Place), ὄφρα, ἕως, etc. (of Time), frequently in Epic dialect, σαώτερος ὥς κε νέηαι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also after ὡς in [Refs 5th c.BC+] indicative is regular in _Attic dialect_); ἵνα final does not take ἄν or κε except ἵνα εἰδότες ἤ κε θάνωμεν ἤ κεν. φύγοιμεν[Refs 8th c.BC+] = where in [Refs 5th c.BC+] = lest, takes ἄν only with optative in apodosis, as [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) in Epic dialect sometimes with OPTATIVE as with subjunctive (always κε (ν), except εἴ περ ἂν αὐταὶ Μοῦσαι ἀείδοιεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥς κε. δοίη ᾧ κ᾽ ἐθέλοι that he might give her to whomsoever he might please,[Refs 8th c.BC+] belongs to Verb in apodosis, as in ὡς δ᾽ ἂν ἥδιστα ταῦτα φαίνοιτο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) rarely in oratio obliqua, where a relative or temporary word retains an ἄν which it would have with subjunctive in direct form, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—similarly after a preceding optative, οὐκ ἀποκρίναιο ἕως ἂν. σκέψαιο[Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) rarely with εἰ and INDICATIVE in protasis, only in Epic dialect: B.III.1) with future indicative as with subjunctive: αἴ κεν Ἰλίου πεφιδήσεται[Refs 8th c.BC+] B.III.2) with εἰ and a past tense of indicative, once in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so Ζεὺς γάρ κ᾽ ἔθηκε νῆσον εἴ κ᾽ ἐβούλετο Oracle texts cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) in later Greek, ἄν with relative words is used with INDICATIVE in all tenses, as ὅπου ἂν εἰσεπορεύετο[NT+4th c.AD+]; ἔνθ᾽ ἂν πέφυκεν ἡ ὁλότης εἶναι[Refs 6th c.AD+]; compare ἐάν, ὅταν. C) with imperfect and more rarely aorist indicative in ITERATIVE construction, to express elliptically a condilion fulfilled whenever an opportumty offered; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] she would (i. e. used to) weep and lament, 3.119; εἶτα πῦρ ἂν οὐ παρῆν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴ τινες ἴδοιεν, ἀνεθάρσησαν ἄν whenever they saw it, on each occasion, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive representing imperfect of this construction, ἀκούω Λακεδαιμονίους τότε ἐμβαλόντας ἂν. ἀναχωρεῖν, i. e. I hear they used to retire (ἀνεχώρουν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D) GENERAL REMARKS: D.I) POSITION OF ἄν. D.I.1) in A, when ἄν does not coalesce with the relative word (as in ἐάν, ὅταν), it follows directly or is separated only by other particles, as μέν, δέ, τε, γάρ, καί, νυ, περ, etc; as εἰ μέν κεν. εἰ δέ κε[Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely by τις, as ὅποι τις ἄν, οἶμαι, προσθῇ[Refs 8th c.BC+] two such Particles may precede κε, as εἴ περ γάρ κεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ γάρ τίς κε, ὃς μὲν γάρ κε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; rarely in Prose, ὅποι μὲν γὰρ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.2) in apodosis, ἄν may stand either next to its Verb (before or after it), or after some other emphatic word, especially an interrogative, a negative (e. g. οὐδ᾽ ἂν εἷς, οὐκ ἂν ἔτι, etc.), or an important Adjective or Adverb; also after a participle which represents the protasis, λέγοντος ἄν τινος πιστεῦσαι οἴεσθ; do you think they would have believed it if any one had told them? (εἴ τις ἔλεγεν, ἐπίστευσαν ἄν), [Refs 4th c.BC+] D.I.3) ἄν is frequently separated from its infinitive by such Verbs as οἴομαι, δοκέω, φημί, οἶδα, etc, οὐκ ἂν οἴει; frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ νῦν ἡδέως ἄν μοι δοκῶ κοινωνῆσαι I think that I should, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μήτε προῄδει μηδεὶς μήτ᾽ ἂν ᾠήθη τήμερον ῥηθῆναι (where ἄν belongs to ῥηθῆναι) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.4) ἄν never begins a sentence, or even a clause after a comma, but may stand first after a parenthetic clause, ἀλλ᾽, ὦ μέλ᾽, ἄν μοι σιτίων διπλῶν ἔδει[Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II) REPETITION OF ἄν:—in apodosis ἄν may be used twice or even three times with the same Verb, either to make the condition felt throughout a long sentence, or to emphasize certain words, ὥστ᾽ ἄν, εἰ σθένος λάβοιμι, δηλώσαιμ᾽ ἄν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; attached to a parenthetical phrase, ἔδρασ᾽ ἄν, εὖ τοῦτ᾽ ἴσθ᾽ ἄν, εἰ. [Refs] D.II.2) ἄν is coupled with κε (ν) a few times in [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.III) ELLIPSIS OF VERB:—sometimes the Verb to which ἄν belongs must be supplied, in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὐκ ἂν πρὸ τοῦ (i.e. ἔρρεγκον) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἂν δοκεῖ σοι Πρίαμος (i.e. πρᾶξαι), εἰ τάδ᾽ ἤνυσε;[Refs 4th c.BC+] —so in phrases like{πῶς γὰρ ἄν}; and πῶς οὐκ ἄν (i.e. εἴη); also in ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ (or ὡσπερανεί), as φοβούμενος ὥσπερ ἂν εἰ παῖς (i. e. ὥσπερ ἂν ἐφοβήθη εἰ παῖς ἦν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so τοσοῦτον ἐφρόνησαν, ὅσον περ ἂν (i.e. ἐφρόνησαν) εἰ.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare κἄν:—so the Verb of a protasis containing ἄν may be understood, ὅποι τις ἂν προσθῇ, κἂν μικρὰν δύναμιν (i. e. καὶ ἐὰν προσθῇ) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐμοῦ οὖν ἰόντος ὅπῃ ἂν καὶ ὑμεῖς (i.e. ἴητε) [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.IV) ELLIPSIS OF ἄν:—when an apodosis consists of several co-ordinate clauses, ἄν is generally used only in the first and understood in the others: πείθοι᾽ ἂν εἰ πείθοι᾽· ἀπειθοίης δ᾽ ἴσως[Refs 4th c.BC+]: even when the construction is continued in a new sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is repeated for the sake of clearness or emphasis,[Refs 5th c.BC+] B) ἄν, [ᾱ], Attic dialect, ={ἐάν},{ἤν}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ[Refs 4th c.BC+]: not common in earlier Attic dialect Inscrr, [NT+4th c.BC+] C) ἄν or ἀν, Epic form of ἀνά, (which see) D) ἄν, shortened from ἄνα, see entry ἀνά G.
Strongs
Word:
ἄν
Transliteration:
án
Pronounciation:
an
Language:
Greek
Definition:
; (what-, where-, wither-, who-)soever; a primary particle, denoting a supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty

he might wish
Strongs:
Word:
θέλοι
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Present Active Optative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that hopefully happens - by a person or thing being discussed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to will
Tyndale
Word:
θέλω
Transliteration:
thelō
Gloss:
to will/desire
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
θέλω (the strengthened form ἐθέλω is found in Hom, and is the more freq. in Attic; see Rutherford, NPhr., 415f.), [in LXX for חפץ,אבה; with neg, מאן pi, etc;] to will, be willing, wish, desire (more freq. than βούλομαι, which see, in vernac. and late Gk, also in MGr; for various views as to its relation to β, see Thayer, 286; but see also BL, §24, see word): absol, Rom.9:16, 1Co.4:19 12:18, Jas.4:15; τ. θεοῦ θέλοντος, Act.18:21; with accusative of thing(s), Mat.20:21, Mrk.14:36, Jhn.15:7, Rom.7:15, 16 1Co.4:21 7:36, Gal.5:17; with inf, Mat.5:40, Mrk.10:43, Jhn.6:21, 67 Rom.7:21, Gal.4:9; with accusative and inf, Mrk.7:24, Luk.1:62, Jhn.21:22, 23 Rom.16:19, 1Co.14:5, Gal.6:13; οὐ θέλω, Mat.18:30, al; id. with inf, Mat.2:18, Mrk.6:26, Jhn.5:40, 1Co.16:7; before ἵνα, Mat.7:12, Mrk.6:25, Jhn.17:24; opp. to ποιέω, πράσσω, ἐνεργέω, Rom.7:15, 19 2Co.8:10, 11 Php.2:13; before ἤ (ICG, in l; Deiss, LAE, 179:24), 1Co.14:19; θέλων ἐν ταπεινοφροσυνῄ (of his own mere will, by humility, R, mg), Col.2:18; in OT quotations, for Heb. חפץ, with accusative of person(s), Mat.27:43; with accusative of thing(s), Mat.9:13 12:7, Heb.10:5, 8; with inf, 1Pe.3:10; for אמר, with inf, Act.7:28 (see Cremer, 726ff.). θέλω (the strengthened form ἐθέλω is found in Hom, and is the more freq. in Attic; see Rutherford, NPhr., 415f.), [in LXX for חפץ,אבה; with neg, מאן pi, etc;] to will, be willing, wish, desire (more freq. than βούλομαι, which see, in vernac. and late Gk, also in MGr; for various views as to its relation to β, see Thayer, 286; but see also BL, §24, see word): absol, Rom.9:16, 1Co.4:19 12:18, Jas.4:15; τ. θεοῦ θέλοντος, Act.18:21; with accusative of thing(s), Mat.20:21, Mrk.14:36, Jhn.15:7, Rom.7:15, 16 1Co.4:21 7:36, Gal.5:17; with inf, Mat.5:40, Mrk.10:43, Jhn.6:21, 67 Rom.7:21, Gal.4:9; with accusative and inf, Mrk.7:24, Luk.1:62, Jhn.21:22, 23 Rom.16:19, 1Co.14:5, Gal.6:13; οὐ θέλω, Mat.18:30, al; id. with inf, Mat.2:18, Mrk.6:26, Jhn.5:40, 1Co.16:7; before ἵνα, Mat.7:12, Mrk.6:25, Jhn.17:24; opp. to ποιέω, πράσσω, ἐνεργέω, Rom.7:15, 19 2Co.8:10, 11 Php.2:13; before ἤ (ICG, in l; Deiss, LAE, 179:24), 1Co.14:19; θέλων ἐν ταπεινοφροσυνῄ (of his own mere will, by humility, R, mg), Col.2:18; in OT quotations, for Heb. חפץ, with accusative of person(s), Mat.27:43; with accusative of thing(s), Mat.9:13 12:7, Heb.10:5, 8; with inf, 1Pe.3:10; for אמר, with inf, Act.7:28 (see Cremer, 726ff.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
θέλω
Transliteration:
thelō
Gloss:
to will/desire
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
θέλω, see at {ἐθέλω} and add ὅστις ἂν θέλῃ [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
θέλω
Transliteration:
thélō
Pronounciation:
eth-el-eh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to determine (as an active option from subjective impulse; whereas g1014 (βούλομαι) properly denotes rather a passive acquiescence in objective considerations), i.e. choose or prefer (literally or figuratively); by implication, to wish, i.e. be inclined to (sometimes adverbially, gladly); impersonally for the future tense, to be about to; by Hebraism, to delight in; desire, be disposed (forward), intend, list, love, mean, please, have rather, (be) will (have, -ling, - ling(-ly)); apparently strengthened from the alternate form of g138 (αἱρέομαι);

to be called
Strongs:
Word:
καλεῖσθαι
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Present Passive Infinitive
Grammar:
an ACTION that is to be done
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to call (call/invite)
Tyndale
Word:
καλέω
Transliteration:
kaleō
Gloss:
: call
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
καλέω, -ῶ, [in LXX chiefly for קרא;] 1) to call, summon: with accusative of person(s), Mat.20:8 25:14, Mrk.3:31, Luk.19:13, Act.4:18; before ἐκ, Mat.2:15 (LXX); metaph, 1Pe.2:9. 2) to call to one's house, invite: Luk.14:16, 1Co.10:27, Rev.19:9; εἰς τ. γάμους, Mat.22:3, 9 Luk.14:8, 9 Jhn.2:2; ὁ καλέσας, Luk.7:39; οἱ κεκλημένοι, Mat.22:8; metaph, of inviting to partake of the blessings of the kingdom of God (Dalman, Words, 118f.): Rom.8:30 9:24, 25 1Co.7:17, 18; before εἰς, 1Co.1:9, 1Th.2:12, 1Ti.6:12; ὁ καλῶν (καλέσας), of God, Gal.1:6 5:8, 1Th.5:24, 1Pe.1:15, 2Pe.1:3; οἱ κεκλκλημένοι, Heb.9:15; before ἐν (ἐπί), 1Co.7:15, Gal.5:13, Eph.4:4, 1Th.4:7; κλήσει, Eph.4:1, 2Ti.1:9. 3) to call, name call by name: pass, Mat.2:23, Luk.1:32, al; καλούμενος, Luk.7:11, Act.7:58, al; ὁ κ. (Deiss, BS, 210), Luk.6:15 22:3 23:33, Act.10:1, Rev.12:9, al; with pred nom, Mat.5:9, Luk.1:35, Rom.9:26, Jas.2:23, 1Jn.3:1. (Cf. ἀντι, ἐν, εἰσ- (-μαι), ἐπι, μετα, παρα, συν-παρα, προ, προσ, συν-καλέω.) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
καλέω
Transliteration:
kaleō
Gloss:
: call
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
κᾰλέω, Aeolic dialect κάλημι (which see), Epic dialect infinitive καλήμεναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: Ionic dialect imperfect καλέεσκον [Refs]; 3rd.pers. singular κάλεσκε [Refs 3rd c.BC+]: future, Ionic dialect καλέω [Refs 8th c.BC+], Attic dialect καλῶ [LXX+5th c.BC+]aorist 1 subjunctive): aorist 1 ἐκάλεσα, Epic dialect ἐκάλεσσα, κάλεσσα, [Refs 8th c.BC+] (late Epic dialect ἔκλησα [Refs 2nd c.BC+]: perfect κέκληκα [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle, Attic dialect future καλοῦμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; later καλέσομαι (ἐκ, ἐπι-) uncertain reading in [Refs 4th c.BC+]: aorist 1 ἐκαλεσάμην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect καλεσσάμην [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—passive, future κεκλήσομαι [LXX+8th c.BC+]: aorist ἐκλήθην [Refs 7th c.BC+]perfect κέκλημαι, Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural κεκλήαται [Refs 3rd c.BC+], Ionic dialect κεκλέαται [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural pluperfect κεκλήατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect κεκάλεσμαι Suid. see at {κλητή}. I) call, summon, εἰς ἀγορὴν καλέσαντα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀγορήνδε, θάλαμόνδε, θάνατόνδε, [Refs 8th c.BC+] they had been summoned to the council, [Refs]infinitive, αὐτοὶ γὰρ κάλεον συμμητιάασθαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. τινὰ εἰς ἕ, ἐπὶ οἷ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; demand, require, ἡ ἡμέρα 'κείνη εὔνουν καὶ πλούσιον ἄνδρα ἐκάλει [Refs 4th c.BC+]aorist middle, καλέσασθαί τινα call to oneself, frequently in Epic dialect, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; call a witness, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) call to one's house or to a repast, invite (not in [NT+8th c.BC+]; later usually with a word added, κ. ἐπὶ δεῖπνον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κληθέντες πρός τινα invited to his house, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ κεκλημένος the guest, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I.3) invoke, Δία [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle, τοὺς θεοὺς καλούμεθα [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but ἀράς, ἅς σοι καλοῦμαι which I call down on thee, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, of the god, to be invoked, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I.4) as law-term, summon, of the judge, καλεῖν τινας εἰς τὸ δικαστήριον cite or summon before the court, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; simply καλεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὁ ἄρχων τὴν δίκην καλεῖ calls on the case, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, ἡ πατροκτόνος δίκη κεκλῇτ᾽ ἂν αὐτῷ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρὶν τὴν ἐμὴν [δίκην] καλεῖσθαι before it is called on, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but, I.4.b) of the plaintiff in middle, καλεῖσθαί τινα to sue at law, bring before the court, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ καλεσάμενος the plaintiff, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] I.5) with an abstract subject, demand, require, καλεῖ ἡ τάξις with infinitive, [Refs 3rd c.AD+] I.6) metaphorically in passive, καλουμένης τῆς δυνάμεως πρὸς τὴν συναναληψίαν called forth, summoned, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) call by name, name, ὃν Βριάρεων καλέουσι θεοί [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὄνομα καλεῖν τινα call him by a name, εἴπ᾽ ὄνομ᾽ ὅττι σε κεῖθι κάλεον [Refs 8th c.BC+] (in passive, οὔνομα καλέεσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] shall be given to thy tomb, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. ὄνομα ἐπί τινι give a name to something, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but call (a man) a name because of some function, [NT+2nd c.BC+]:—passive, to be named or called, Μυρμιδόνες δὲ καλεῦντο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὁ καλούμενος the socalled, ἐν τῇ Θεράπνῃ καλεομένῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ τῶν ὁμοτίμων κ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κεκλημένος τινός called from or after him, [LXX+5th c.BC+] II.2) passive, to be called, almost ={εἰμί}, especially with words expressing kinship or status, ἐμὸς γαμβρὸς καλέεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially in perfect passive κέκλημαι, οὕνεκα σὴ παράκοιτις κέκλημαι because I am thy wife, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.3) special constructions, a. Ἀλησίου ἔνθα κολώνη κέκληται where is the hill called the hill of Alesios, [Refs 8th c.BC+]active, ἔνθα Ῥέας πόρον ἄνθρωποι καλέοισιν where is the ford men call the ford of Rhea, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3.b) folld by a dependent clause, ἐκάλεσσέ νιν ἰσώνυμον ἔμμεν said that his name should be the same, [Refs]; καλεῖ με πλαστὸς ὡς εἴην πατρί, i.e. καλεῖ με πλαστόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καλοῦμέν γε παραδιδόντα μὲν διδάσκειν we say that one who delivers teaches, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
καλέω
Transliteration:
kaléō
Pronounciation:
kal-eh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to "call" (properly, aloud, but used in a variety of applications, directly or otherwise); bid, call (forth), (whose, whose sur-)name (was (called)); akin to the base of g2753 (κελεύω);

him.
Strongs:
Word:
αὐτό
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun Accusative Singular Neuter
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned neuter person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated differently in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Meanings:
|VC TR+Byz = αὐτόν = "him" = G846 = P-ASM
Additional:
it
Conjoined:
«020:G2564
Tyndale
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
αὐτός, -ή, -ό, determinative pron., in late Gk. much more freq. than in cl. (WM, 178f; Jannaris, HGG, §1399). 1) Emphatic (so always in nom. exc. when preceded by the art, see infr, iii); (1) self (ipse), expressing opposition, distinction, exclusion, etc, αὐ. ἐκχυθήσεται, Luk.5:37; αὐ. ἐγινώσκεν, Jhn.2:25; αὐ.ὑμεῖς, Jhn.3:28; καὶ αὐ. ἐγώ, Rom.15:14; αὐ. Ἰησοῦς, Jhn.2:24; αὐ. καὶ οἱ μετ᾽ αὐτοῦ, Mrk.2:25; ὑμεῖς αὐ, Mrk.6:31; esp. (as freq in cl.) αὐ. ὁ, Mat.3:4, Mrk.6:17, Jhn.16:27, 1Th.3:11, al; in late Gk, sometimes weakened, ἐν αὐτῇ τ. ὥρᾳ, in that hour, Luk.10:21 (M, Pr., 91; MM, see word); (2) emphatic, he, she, it (M, Pr., 86; Bl, §48, 1, 2, 7), Mat.1:21, 12:50, Luk.6:35, al; pointing to some one as master (cl.), Mat.8:24, Mrk.4:38, al; αὐ, καὶ αὐ. = οὗτος, ὁ δε (BL, §48, 1), Mat.14:2, Mrk.14:15, 44, Luk.1:22, 2:28, al. 2) In oblique cases (cl.), for the simple pron. of 3rd of person(s), he, she, it, Mat.7:9, 10:12, 26:44, al; with ptcp. in genitive absol, Mat.9:18, Mrk.13:1, al. (for irreg. constructions, V. Bl, §74, 5); pleonastically after the relative (cf. Heb. אֲשֶׁר לוֹ; WM, 184ff; Bl, §50, 4; MM, see word), Mrk.7:25, Rev.3:8, 7:2, al; in constr. ad sensum, without proper subject expressly indicated, Mat.4:23, Act.8:5, 2Co.2:13, al; genitive αὐτοῦ = ἐκείνου, Rom.11:11, 1Th.2:19, Tit.3:5, Heb.2:4. 3) ὁ, ἡ, τὸ αὐ, the same: Heb.1:12, 13:8; τὸ αὐ, ποιεῖν, Mat.5:46, 47, al; φρονεῖν, Rom.12:16, 15:5, Php.2:2, al; τὰ αὐ, Act.15:27, Rom.2:1, al; κατὰ τὸ (τὰ) αὐ. (MM, see word), Act.14:1, Luk.6:23, al; ἐπὶ τὸ αὐ, together (MM, see word), Mat.22:34, Act.1:15, al; ἓν κ. τὸ αὐ, 1Co.11:5, 12:11; with dative (cl.), 1Co.11:5; with a noun, λόγος, Mrk.14:39; μέτρος, Php.1:30; πνεῦμα, 1Co.12:4. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
αὐτός (Cretan dialect ἀϝτός [Refs] (also αὐτόν[Refs], reflexive pronoun, self:—in oblique cases used for the personal pronoun, him, her, it:—with Article, ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό (also ταὐτόν), etc, the very one, the same. I) self, myself, thyself, etc, accusative to the person of the Verb: frequently joined with ἐγώ, σύ, etc. (see. below 10), I.1) one's true self, the soul, not the body, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; reversely, body, not soul, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; oneself, as opposed to others who are less prominent, as king to subject, [Refs]; man to wife and children, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; warrior to horses, [Refs 8th c.BC+], or to weapons, [Refs]; shepherd to herd, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; seamen to ships, [Refs]: generally, whole to parts,[Refs 5th c.BC+]: absolutely, the Master, as in the [Refs 4th c.BC+] Latin Ipse dixit; so τίς οὗτος;— Αὐτός, i.e. Socrates, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀναβόησον Αὐτόν[Refs]the Master, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the result will show, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially αὐτὸ δείξει[Refs 5th c.BC+]; of things, the very, ὑπὸ λόφον αὐτόν, i.e. just, exactly under, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρὸς αὐταῖς ταῖς θύραις close by the door, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ δέον the very thing needed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ περίορθρον the point of dawn, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ τὰ ἐναντία the very opposite, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even, οὔ μοι μέλει ἄλγος οὔτ᾽ αὐτῆς Ἑκάβης[Refs 8th c.BC+] —In these senses αὐτός in Prose either precedes both the _Article_ and substantive, or follows both, e.g. αὐτὸς ὁ υἱός or ὁ υἱὸς αὐτός. The Article is sometimes omitted with proper names, or Nouns denoting individuals, αὐτὸς Μένων[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) of oneself, of one's own accord, ἀλλά τις αὐ. ἴτω[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also, in person, τῶν πραγμάτων ὑμῖν. αὐτοῖς ἀντιληπτέον[Refs 4th c.BC+] I.3) by oneself or itself, alone, αὐτός περ ἐών although alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς ἐγείναο παῖδ᾽, i.e. without a mother,[Refs 8th c.BC+]by himself, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ γάρ ἐσμεν we are by ourselves, i.e. among friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ γὰρ ἔστιν ταῦτα these and no others, [Refs 5th c.BC+] himself alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς μόνος, see at {μόνος} II; αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτόν, see at {ἑαυτοῦ}. I.4) in Philosophy, by or in itself, of an abstract concept or idea, δίκαιον αὐτό[Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently in this sense, attached to Nouns of all genders, οὐκ αὐτὸ δικαιοσύνην ἐπαινοῦντες ἀλλὰ τὰς ἀπ᾽ αὐτῆς εὐδοκιμήσεις[Refs 5th c.BC+]; more fully, εἰ αὐτὸ τοῦτο πατέρα ἠρώτων, ἆρα ὁ πατήρ ἐστι πατήρ τινος, ἢ ο; [Refs]; ἀδελφός, αὐτὸ τοῦτο ὅπερ ἔστιν the ideal, abstract brother, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; less frequently agreeing with the substantive, ἵνα αὐτὴ δικαιοσύνη πρὸς ἀδικίαν αὐτὴν κριθείη[Refs 5th c.BC+]its very self, [Refs] I.5) in dative with substantive, in one, together, ἀνόρουσεν αὐτῇ σὺν φόρμιγγι he sprang up lyre in hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτῇ σὺν πήληκι κάρη helmet and all,[Refs 8th c.BC+] men and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοῖσι συμμάχοισι allies and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.6) added to ordinal Numbers, e.g. πέμπτος αὐτός himself the fifth, i. e. himself with four others, [NT+5th c.BC+] I.7) frequently coupled with οὗτος, τοῦτ᾽ αὐτό ἐστι τὸ ζητηθέν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταῦτα ἥκω αὐτὰ ἵνα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.8) καὶ αὐτός himself too, [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.9) repeated in apodosi for emphasis, αὐτὸς ἐπαγγειλάμενος σώσειν. αὐτὸς ἀπώλεσεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10) in connexion with the person. pronoun, ἐγὼν αὐτός[Refs 8th c.BC+]; followed by an enclitic pronoun, αὐτόν μιν[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.b) with person. pronoun omitted, αὐτός. ἧσθαι λιλαίομαι, for ἐγὼ αὐτός, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸν ἐλέησον, for ἐμὲ αὐτόν,[Refs 8th c.BC+] is simply a strengthened form of ο; and so in Attic dialect, when σὲ αὐτόν, ἐμοὶ αὐτῷ, etc, are read divisim, they are emphatic, not reflexive; in this case αὐτός generally precedes the person. pronoun,[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.c) with the reflexive ἑαυτοῦ, αὑτοῦ, etc, to add force and definiteness, αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτοῦ[Refs 4th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ ὑφ᾽ αὑτῶν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; sometimes between the Article and reflexive pronoun, τοῖς αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ πήμασιν βαρύνεται[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.d) αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶν with possessive pronoun, πατρὸς κλέος ἠδ᾽ ἐμὸν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοῖς οἷσιν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.e) αὐτὸς ἑαυτοῦ with comparative and superlative adjective, αὐτὸς ἑωυτοῦ ῥέει πολλῷ ὑποδεέστερος[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.11) αὐτός for ὁ αὐτός, the same, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in later Prose, αὐταῖς ταῖς ἡμέραις[NT+2nd c.AD+] I.12) comparative αὐτότερος[Refs 5th c.BC+]: superlative αὐτότατος his very self, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. adverb, comparative αὐτοτέρως[Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) he, she, it, for the simple pronoun of 3 person, only in oblique cases (except in later Gk, [NT], and rarely first in a sentence, [NT+5th c.BC+]: rare in Epic dialect, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and mostly emphatic,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in Prose, to recall a Noun used earlier in the sentence, ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν βασιλέα. οὐκ οἶδα ὅ τι δεῖ αὐτὸν ὀμόσαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; after a Relative, ὅς κε θεοῖς ἐπιπείθηται. ἔκλυον αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially where a second Verb requires a change of case in the pronoun, οἳ ἂν ἐξελεγχθῶσι. ὡς προδότας αὐτοὺς ὄντας τιμωρηθῆναι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; later, pleonastically after a Relative, ὧν ὁ μὲν αὐτῶν[NT+5th c.BC+] III) with Article ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό, and Attic dialect contraction αὑτός, αὑτή, ταὐτό and ταὐτόν (as required by the metre,[Refs 5th c.BC+] plural neuter ταὐτ; Ionic dialect ὡυτός, τὠυτό:—the very one, the same, rare in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with dative, to denote sameness or agreement, especially in Prose, τὠυτὸ ἂν ὑμῖν ἐπρήσσομεν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ αὐτὸς τῷ λίθῳ the same as the stone, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ταὐτῷ εἶναί τινι to be in the place with, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσίεσθαί τινα ἐς ταὐτὸ ἑαυτῷ to have a person meet one,[Refs 5th c.BC+]face to face, [Refs 4th c.AD+] III.2) in later Greek, the said, the above-named, Ἡρώδης ὁ αὐ.[Refs 3rd c.BC+] IV) Adverbial phrases: IV.1) αὐτὸ μόνον simply, merely, [Refs 1st c.AD+] IV.2) αὐτό as adverb, ={ἄρτι}, [Refs] IV.3) αὐτὸ τοῦτο as adverb, [NT+2nd c.BC+] IV.4) with Preps, ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτό added together, making a total, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; κατὰ τὸ αὐτό together, at the same time,[NT], etc; but κατ᾽ αὐτό just then, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) In Compos: V.1) of or by oneself, self-, as in αὐτοδίδακτος, αὐτογνώμων, αὐτόματος: and so, independently, as in αὐτοκράτωρ, αὐτόνομος. V.2) hence, as a second self, very, bodily, as with proper names, Αὐτοθαΐς. V.3) in the abstract, the ideal, see above[Refs] V.4) precisely, as in αὐτόδεκα. V.5) rarely with reflexive sense of ἀλλήλων, as in αὐτοκτονέω. V.6) in one piece with, together with, as in αὐτόκωπος, αὐτοχείλης, αὐτόπρεμνος, αὐτόρριζος. V.7) by itself: hence, only, as in αὐτόξυλος, αὐτόποκος.—For αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶς, etc, see the respective Arts.
Strongs
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autós
Pronounciation:
ow-tos'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative g1438 (ἑαυτοῦ)) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons; her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which; from the particle (perhaps akin to the base of g109 (ἀήρ) through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward);