১ম করিন্থীয় 15:39

39 ৩৯ সকল মাংস এক ধরনের মাংস না; কিন্তু মানুষের এক ধরনের, পশুর মাংস অন্য ধরনের, পাখির মাংস অন্য ধরনের, ও মাছের অন্য ধরনের।
Not
Strongs:
Word:
οὐ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Negative Particle Negative Negative
Grammar:
introducing a negative
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
no
Tyndale
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek, Negative
Definition:
οὐ, before a vowel with smooth breathing οὐκ, before one with rough breathing οὐχ (but improperly οὐχ ἰδού, Act.2:7, WH, mg; cf. WH, Intr., §409; M, Pr., 44, 244), [in LXX for אֵין,אַיִן,לֹא;] neg. particle, not, no, used generally with indic, and for a denial of fact (cf. μή); 1) absol. (accented), οὔ, no: Mat.13:29 Jhn.1:21 21:5; οὒ οὕ, Mat.5:37 Jas.5:12. 2) Most freq. negativing a verb or other word, Mat.1:25 10:26, 38, Mrk.3:25 9:37, Jhn.8:29, Act.7:5, Rom.1:16, Php.3:3, al; in litotes, οὐκ ὀλίγοι (i.e. very many), Act.17:4, al; οὐκ ἄσημος, Act.21:39; πᾶς. οὐ, with verb, (like Heb. כֹּל. לֹא), no, none, Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, Luk.1:37, Eph.5:5, al; in disjunctive statements, οὐκ. ἀλλά, Luk.8:52 Jhn.1:33 Rom.8:2 o, al; with 2 of person(s) fut. (like Heb. לֹא, with impf.), as emphatic prohibition, Mat.4:7, Luk.4:12, Rom.7:7, al. 3) With another negative, (a) strengthening the negation: Mrk.5:37, Jhn.8:15 12:19, Act.8:39, al; (b) making an affirmative: Act.4:20, 1Co.12:15. 4) With other particles: οὐ μή (see: μή); οὐ μηκέτι, Mat.21:19; with μή interrog, Rom.10:18, 1Co.9:4, 5 11:22. 5) Interrogative, expecting an affirmative answer (Lat. nonne): Mat.6:26, Mrk.4:21, Luk.11:40, Jhn.4:35, Rom.9:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Gloss:
no
Morphhology:
Greek, Negative
Definition:
οὐ, the negative of fact and statement, as μή of will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. —The same differences hold for all compounds of οὐ and μή, and some examples of οὐδέ and οὐδείς are included below.—As to the Form, see infr. G. USAG[Refs 5th c.BC+] I) as the negative of single words, II) as the negative of the sentence. I) οὐ adhering to single words so as to form a quasi-compound with them:—with Verbs: οὐ δίδωμι withhold, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐκ εἰῶ prevent, [Refs]; οὐκ ἐθέλω refuse, [Refs]; οὔ φημι deny, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but sometimes οὐ is retained, εἰ δ᾽ ἂν. οὐκ ἐθέλωσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐάντε. οὐ (variant{μή}) φῆτε ἐάντε φῆτε [Refs 8th c.BC+] —On the use of οὐ in contrasts, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) as negativing the whole sentence, II.1) οὐ is frequently used alone, sometimes with the ellipsis of a definite Verb, οὔκ (i.e. ἀποκερῇ), ἄν γε ἐμοὶ πείθῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes as negativing the preceding sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+] and the accusative; sometimes without μά, οὐ τὸν πάντων θεῶν θεὸν πρόμον Ἅλιον [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) with indicative of statement, τὴν δ᾽ ἐγὼ οὐ λύσω [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ φθίνει Κροίσου φιλόφρων ἀρετά [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.3) with subjunctive in future sense, only in Epic dialect, οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται [Refs] II.4) with optative in potential sense (without ἄν or κεν), also Epic dialect, ὃ οὐ δύο γ᾽ ἄνδρε φέροιεν [Refs] II.5) with optative and ἄν, κείνοισι δ᾽ ἂν οὔ τις. μαχέοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6) in dependent clauses οὐ is used, II.6.a) with ὅτι or ὡς, after Verbs of saying, knowing, and showing, ἐκ μέν τοι ἐρέω. ὡς ἐγὼ οὔ τι ἑκὼν κατερύκομαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so with indicative or optative and ἄν, ἀπελογοῦντο ὡς οὐκ ἄν ποτε οὕτω μωροὶ ἦσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] in such sentences, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.b) in all causal sentences, and in temporal and Relat. sentences unless there is conditional or final meaning, χωσαμένη, ὅ οἱ οὔ τι θαλύσια. ῥέξε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in causal relative sentences, οἵτινές σε οὐχὶ ἐσώσαμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in the combinations, οὐκ ἔστιν ὅστις οὐ, as οὐκ ἔστ᾽ ἐραστὴς ὅστις οὐκ ἀεὶ φιλεῖ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδείς ἐστιν ὅστις οὐ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6.c) after ὥστε with indicative or optative with ἄν, ὥστ᾽ οὐ δυνατόν σ᾽ εἵργειν ἔσται [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive is almost invariably due to indirect speech, ὥστ᾽ οὐκ αἰσχύνεσθαι (for οὐκ αἰσχύνονται) [Refs 5th c.BC+]—Rarely not in indirect speech, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7) in a conditional clause μή is necessary, except, II.7.a) in [Refs 8th c.BC+] clause precedes the apodosis and the verb is indicative, εἰ δέ μοι οὐκ ἐπέεσσ᾽ ἐπιπείσεται [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.7.b) when the εἰ clause is really causal, as after Verbs expressing surprise or emotion, μὴ θαυμάσῃς, εἰ πολλὰ τῶν εἰρημένων οὐ πρέπει σοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.7.c) when οὐ belongs closely to the next word (see. [Refs 4th c.BC+], or is quoted unchanged, εἰ, ὡς νῦν φήσει, οὐ παρεσκευάσατο [Refs 4th c.BC+]; εἰ δ᾽ οὐκέτ᾽ ἐστί (i.e. ὥσπερ λέγεις), τίνι τρόπῳ διεφθάρη ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) οὐ is used with infinitive in indirect speech, when it represents the indicative of orat. recta, φαμὲν δέ οἱ οὐ τελέεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes we have οὐ and μή in consecutive clauses, οἶμαι σοῦ κάκιον οὐδὲν ἂν τούτων κρατύνειν μηδ᾽ ἐπιθύνειν χερί [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9) οὐ is used with the participle, when it can be resolved into a finite sentence with οὐ, as after Verbs of knowing and showing, τὸν κατθανόνθ᾽ ὁρῶντες οὐ τιμώμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a causal sentence, τῶν βαρβάρων οἱ πολλοὶ ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ διεφθάρησαν νέειν οὐκ ἐπιστάμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or into a concessive sentence, δόξω γυναῖκα καίπερ οὐκ ἔχων ἔχειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] and participle, ὡς οὐχὶ συνδράσουσα νουθετεῖς τάδε [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—for exceptions, see at {μή} [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.9.b) when the participle is used with the Article, μή is generally used, unless there is a distinct reference to a fact, when οὐ is occasionally found, ἡμεῖς δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς οὐκ οὔσης ἔτι [πόλεως] ὁρμώμενοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.10) Adjectives and abstract Substantives with the article commonly take μή (see. μή [Refs 5th c.BC+] is occasionally used, τὰς οὐκ ἀναγκαίας πόσεις [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν τῶν γεφυρῶν οὐ διάλυσιν the non- dissolution of the bridges, the fact of their notbeing broken up, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so without the article, ἐν οὐ καιπῷ [Refs] II.11) for οὐ μή, see entry II.12) in questions οὐ ordinarily expects a positive answer, οὔ νυ καὶ ἄλλοι ἔασι.; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὁράᾳς.; dost thou not see? [NT+8th c.BC+]: the diphthong is genuine and always written ου (ουκ, ουδε, etc.) in early Inscrr, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; οὐ abbreviated ο, Suid. see at {Φιλοξένου γραμμάτιον}. H) ACCENTUATION. οὐ is oxytone accusative to Hdn.Gr.1.494 (text doubtfulin 504): [Refs 8th c.BC+] H.I) οὐ in connexion with other Particles will be found in alphabetical order, οὐ γάρ, οὐ μή, etc.—The corresponding forms of μή should be compared.
Strongs
Word:
οὐ
Transliteration:
ou
Pronounciation:
ookh
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the absolute negative (compare g3361 (μή)) adverb; no or not; + long, nay, neither, never, no (X man), none, (can-)not, + nothing, + special, un(-worthy), when, + without, + yet but; a primary word;

all
Strongs:
Word:
πᾶσα
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
πᾶς
Transliteration:
pas
Gloss:
all
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
πᾶς, πᾶσα, πᾶν, genitive, παντός, πάσης, παντός, [in LXX chiefly for כֹּל;] all, every. I. As adj, 1) with subst. anarth, all, every, of every kind: Mat.3:10 4:23, Mrk.9:49, Luk.4:37, Jhn.2:1 o, Act.27:20, Rom.7:8, Rev.18:17, al. mult; pl, all, Act.22:15, Rom.5:12, Heb.1:6, al; of the highest degree, π. ἐξουσία (προθυμία, χαρά), Mat.28:18, Act.17:11, Phi 2:29, al; also the whole (though in this sense more freq. with art.), Mat.2:3, Act.2:36, Rom.11:26. 2) C. art. (before the art, after the noun, or, denoting totality, between the art. and noun), all, whole: Mat.8:32 13:2, Mrk.5:33, Luk.1:10, Act.7:14, Rom.3:19, Gal.5:14, Eph.4:16, al; pl, Mat.2:4, Mrk.4:13, Rom.1:5, al. II. As pron, 1) masc. and fem, every one: Mrk.9:49, Luk.16:16, Heb.2:9; before rel. pron, Mat.7:24, Act.2:21, Gal.3:10, al; with ptcp. (anarth.), Mat.13:19, Luk.11:4; with ptcp. (with art.), Mat.5:22, Mrk.7:8, Luk.6:47, Jhn.3:8, Rom.1:16, al; pl, πάντες, absol, all, all men, Mat.10:22, Mrk.13:13, Luk.20:38, Jhn.1:7 3:26, 1Co.8:1, al; οἱ π. (collectively, as a definite whole), Rom.11:32, 1Co.1:17, Eph.4:13, al; π. οἱ (ὅσοι), Mat.4:24, Mrk.1:32, Luk.4:40, al. 2) Neut, (a) sing, πᾶν, everything, all: πᾶν τό, with ptcp, 1Co.10:25, 27, Eph.5:13, 1Jn.2:16 5:4 (sc. ὄν); πᾶν ὅ, Jhn.17:2, Rom.14:23; collectively, of persons (Westc, in l.), Jhn.6:37, 39; with prep, in adverbial phrases, διὰ παντός, always, Mat.18:10, al; ἐν παντί, in everything, in every way, 2Co.4:8, Phi 4:6, al; (b) pl, πάτνα, all things: absol, Jhn.1:3, 1Co.2:10, Heb.2:8, al; of certain specified things, Mrk.4:34, Luk.1:3, Rom.8:28, 1Th.5:21, al; accusative, πάντα, adverbially, wholly, in all things, in all respects, Act.20:35, 1Co.9:25, al; with art, τὰ π, all things (a totality, as distinct from anarth. πάντα, all things severally; cf. Westc, Eph., 186f.), absol: Rom.11:36, 1Co.8:6, Eph.3:9, Heb.1:3, al; relatively, Mrk.4:11, Act.17:25, Rom.8:32, al; πάντα, with ptcp, Mat.18:31, al; πάντα ταῦτα (ταῦτα π.), Mat.6:32, 33, al; πάντα, with prep, in adverbial phrases, πρὸ πάντων, above all things, Jas.5:12, 1Pe.4:8; ἐν π́, in all things, in all ways, 1Ti.3:11, 1Pe.4:11, al; κατὰ πάντα, in all respects, Act.17:22, al. 3) C. neg, πᾶς οὐ (μή) = οὐδείς, see: οὐ and μή, and cf. M, Pr., 245f. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πᾶς
Transliteration:
pas
Gloss:
all
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
πᾶς, πᾶσα, πᾶν, A) Aeolic dialect παῖς, παῖσα [Refs 7th c.BC+] feminine πάνσα [Refs 8th c.BC+], Epic dialect and Delph. πάντεσσι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also Locrian dialect πάντεσιν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πάντοις [Refs 2nd c.BC+] as accusative masculine in [LXX+7th c.BC+], etc. (but in compounds sometimes long in Attic dialect, [Refs].]—Coll. pronoun, when used of a number, all; when of one only, the whole; of the several persons in a number, every. A.I) in plural, all, πάντες τε θεοὶ πᾶσαί τε θέαιναι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πάντες ὅσοι. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πάντας ᾧ ἂνπεριτυγχάνῃ, for ὅσοις ἄν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with the Article, see.below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.I.2) strengthened by adverbs, ἅμα πάντες all together, [Refs 8th c.BC+], but not always, see [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with a collective noun, ἅμα πᾶς ὁ δῆμος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.I.3) with superlative,πάντες ἄριστοι all the noblest, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.I.4) consisting or composed wholly of, i.e. nothing but, only, φρουρούμενος ὑπὸ πάντων πολεμίων [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see 11.2. A.II) singular, all, the whole, πᾶς δ᾽ ἄρα χαλκῷ λάμπε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πᾶσα ὕλη all the wood, [Refs 8th c.BC+];πᾶσα ἀληθείη all the truth, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὴν φάτνην ἐοῦσαν χαλκέην πᾶσαν all of bronze, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἦν ἡ μάχη καρτερὰ καὶ ἐν χερσὶ πᾶσα, ἦν γὰρ τὸ χωρίον πρόσαντες πᾶν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πᾶν κράτος the whole power, sovereign power, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πᾶσαι δ᾽ ὠΐγνυντο πύλαι, πᾶσαι γὰρ ἐπῴχατο [πύλαι], the whole gate was open (shut), i.e. the gate was wide open, quite shut, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.2) as in [Refs]nought but mischief, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III) every, οἱ δ᾽ ἄλκιμον ἦτορ ἔχοντες. πᾶς πέτεται [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄκουε πᾶς, ={ἀκούετε πάντες}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with the Article, see infr. B; πᾶς τις every single one, [Refs 6th c.BC+]; πᾶς ὅστις. [Refs]; πᾶν ὅσον. [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.III.2) less frequently, any one, τὸ μὲν ἐπιτιμᾶν. φήσαιτις ἂν. παντὸς εἶναι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παντὸς ἀκούοντος. when any one hears, [NT]; ἀμήχανον δὲ παντὸς ἀνδρὸς ἐκμαθεῖν ψυχήν any man's soul, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πάντων ἀποστερεῖσθαι λυπηρόν to be deprived of anything, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B) with the Article, in the sense of all, the whole, when the substantive is to be strongly specified, πᾶς being put either before the Article or after the substantive, πᾶσαν τὴν δύναμιν all his force, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with abstract Nouns and others which require the Article, πάντα τὰ μέλλοντα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῆς πόλεως π. all the affairs of state, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) πᾶς is put between the Article and substantive, to denote totality (V. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ πάντες ἄνθρωποι absolutely all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so πᾶν the neuter with the Article itself becomes a substantive, τὸ πᾶν the whole, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τὰ πάντα the whole, [Refs]; τοῖς πᾶσιν in all points, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ πάντες all of them, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but also, the community, opposed to οἱ ὀλίγοι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ μὲν [τάξις] πάντα ἕν, ἡ δὲ πάντα ὅλον, ἡ δὲ πάντα πᾶν all things as a unity, as a totality, as an integral sum, [Refs 5th c.AD+] C) with Numerals to mark an exact number, ἐννέα πάντες full nine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] of all kinds, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἀρχιτέκτονα. ἐδωρήσατο πᾶσι δέκα with ten presents of all kinds, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II) with the Article, in all, οἱ πάντες. εἷς καὶ ἐνενήκοντα [Refs 5th c.BC+] D) Special Usages: in dative plural masculine πᾶσι, with or in the judgement of all, [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.2) feminine plural, ἔδοξε πάσαις (i.e. ταῖς ψήφοις) carried unanimously, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] D.II) neuter plural πάντα all kinds of things, [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.II.2) πάντα γιγνόμενος becoming all things, i. e. assuming every shape, [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.II.3) πάντα εἶναί τινι to be everything to one, ἦν οἱ. τὰ πάντα ἡ Κυνώ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἦσάν οἱ πάντα —ἅπαντα codices) αἱ Συρήκουσαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; π. ἦν Ἀλέξανδρος (i.e. ὑμῖν) [Refs]; π. εἶναι ἔν τισι to be all in all among them, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II.4) πάντα as adverb for πάντως, in all points, entirely, wholly, π. νοήμονες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ πολλὰ π. almost throughout, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but τὰ π. in every way, by all means, altogether, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ἐς τὰ π. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κατὰ π. [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.III) neuter singular, τὸ πᾶν the whole (V. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄξιοι τοῦ π. [Refs]; τὸ πᾶν as adverb, completely, altogether, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but, for all that, nevertheless, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]: with negative, at all, οὐκ ἠξίωσαν οὐδὲ προσβλέψαι τὸ πᾶν [Refs 4th c.BC+]; also πᾶν alone, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.III.b) in Philos, τὸ πᾶν the universe, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; including τὸ κενόν (opposed to τὸ ὅλον), [Refs 4th c.BC+] name for ten, [Refs 4th c.AD+] D.III.c) τῷ παντί in every point, altogether, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.III.d) τὸ π, ={μολυβδόχαλκος}, Ps.- [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.III.2) πᾶν anything, πᾶν μᾶλλον ἢ στρατιήν οἱ ἐδίδου [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴη δ᾽ ἂν πᾶν anything is possible, [Refs]; πᾶν ποιῶν by any means whatever, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πᾶν ποιεῖν ὥστε. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; π. ποιεῖν ὅπως. [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.III.3) ἐπὶ πᾶν on the whole, in general, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.III.4) παντὸς μᾶλλον more than anything, i. e. above all, [Refs 5th c.BC+] quite so, [Refs] D.IV) with Preps, εἰς πᾶν προελήλυθε μοχθηρίας [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἐς τὸ πᾶν altogether, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἐν παντὶ ἀθυμίας εἶναι to be in utter despair, [Refs 5th c.BC+], to be in great danger or fear, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν παντὶ εἶναι μή. to be in great fear lest, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ πᾶσιν in all things, καιρὸς δ᾽ ἐπὶ π. ἄριστος [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but also, finally, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; περὶ παντὸς ποιεῖσθαι esteem above all,[Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρὸ παντὸς εὔχεσθαι wish above all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; διὰ παντός (i.e. χρόνου) for ever, continually, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also, altogether, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ κατὰ πάντων λόγος the common formula, [Refs]; ἡ κ. π. τελετή [Refs]; μέχρι παντός for ever, [Refs 4th c.BC+] D.V) διὰ πασῶν (i.e. χορδῶν), see at {διαπασῶν}. D.VI) οὐ πᾶς not any, i.e. none, [LXX+NT]; ἄνευ πάσης ταραχῆς without any disturbance, [Refs 1st c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
πᾶς
Transliteration:
pâs
Pronounciation:
pas
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
all, any, every, the whole; all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever; including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word;

flesh [is]
Strongs:
Word:
σὰρξ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
flesh
Tyndale
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, σαρκός, ἡ [in LXX chiefly for בָּשָׂר;] flesh; 1) as in cl. generally, (a) prop, of the soft substance of the animal body: 1Co.15:39, 2Co.12:7, Gal.6:13, al; σ. καὶ αἷμα, 1Co.5:50; σ. καὶ ὀστέα, Luk.24:39; pl, of the flesh of many or parts of the flesh of one (cl.), Rev.17:16 19:18; φαγεῖν, Re, ll. with (cf. κατεσθίειν, 4Ki.9:36, al, and βιβρώσκειν, freq. in l.); metaph, Jas.5:3; mystically, φ. (τρώγειν) τὴν σ. τοῦ υἱοῦ τ. ἀνθρώπου, Jhn.6:52-56; (b) Of the whole substance of the body, = σῶμα: Act.2:26 (LXX), 31, 2Co.12:7, Gal.4:14, Eph.5:29; μία σ, Mrk.10:8; εἰς σ. μίαν (Gen.2:24), Mat.19:5, Mrk.10:8, 1Co.6:16, Eph.5:31; hence, of the material as opp. to the immaterial part of man (cf. Lft, Notes, 88): opp. to πνεῦμα, 1Co.5:5, 2Co.7:1, Col.2:5, 1Pe.3:18, 4:6; to ψύχη, Act.2:31, Rec; of the present life, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Rom.7:5, Gal.2:20, Php.1:22, 24 1Pe.4:2; of Christ's life on earth, αἱ ἡμέραι τ. σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ, Heb.5:7; of things pertaining to the body, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Gal.6:12, 13 Php.3:3, 4. 2) As in Heb. idiom, (a) of a living creature: πᾶσα σ. (Heb. כָּל־בָּשָׂר; cf. Bl, §47, 9), Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, 1Pe.1:24; esp. of man and his mortality (Psa.55 (56):5, Sir.28:5, al.), Jhn.1:14; πᾶσα σ. (see supr.), Luk.3:6, Jhn.17:2, Act.2:17, ἐν σ, 1Jo.4:2, 1Ti.3:16; (b) of natural origin and relationship (Gen.2:24, Isa.58:7, al.): τέκνα τῆς σ, Rom.9:8; κατὰ σάρκα, ib. 3, 5, 1Co.10:18, Gal.4:23, 29; ἡ σ. μου, Rom.11:14 (cf. Jdg.9:2, 2Ki.5:1, al.). 3) Of the physical nature as subject to sensation and desire (Plut.), (a) without any ethical disparagement: Rom.7:18 13:14; opp. to πνεῦμα, Mat.26:41, Mrk.14:38; τ. θέλημα τῆς σ, Jhn.1:13; ἡ ἐπιθυμία τῆς σ, 1Jn.2:16; pl, 2Pe.2:18; παθεῖν σαρκί, 1Pe.4:1; (b) in ethical sense, esp. in Pauline Epp, of the flesh as the seat and vehicle of sinful desires: opp. to νοῦς, Rom.7:25; to πνεῦμα, Rom.8:4-9, 12, 13, Gal.5:16, 17 19 6:8 (cf. DB, ii, 14f; iv, 165f; Cremer, 844ff.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, genitive σαρκός, ἡ, Aeolic dialect σύρξ [Refs]:— flesh, [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in plural, except [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes to represent the whole body, μήτε γῆ δέξαιτό μου σάρκας θανόντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also collectively, of the body, γέροντα τὸν νοῦν, σάρκα δ᾽ ἡβῶσαν φέρει [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σαρκὸς περιβόλαια, ἐνδυτά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] uses singular and plural in much the same manner, ταῖς σαρξὶ σάρκες προσγένωνται [Refs], etc: portions of meat, usually in plural, σάρκας τρεῖς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; but, pieces of flesh or membrane, βήσσοντα. ὥστε σάρκας ἐνπύους. ἀποβάλλειν [Refs] b) εἰς σάρκα πημαίνειν to the quick, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 2) ἡ σ. τοῦ σκύτεος the inner or flesh-side of leather, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) fleshy, pulpy substance of fruit, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) the flesh, as the seat of the affections and lusts, fleshly nature, ἐν τῇ σ. ἡ ἡδονή [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδούλωτον (probable reading) τῇ σαρκὶ καὶ τοῖς ταύτης πάθεσι [Refs 1st c.AD+], compare 101b; frequently in NT, [NT] II.2) in “NT” also, the body, τῆς σαρκὸς πρόνοια [NT], = every-body, [LXX+NT]; οὐ. πᾶσα σάρξ nobody, [NT] II.3) the physical or natural order of things, opposed to the spiritual or supernatural, σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα [NT]; τὸν κύριον τῶν πνευμάτων καὶ πάσης σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] twr[kcirc]- 'portion', cf. Avest. θwar[schwa]s- 'cut'.)
Strongs
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sárx
Pronounciation:
sarx
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
flesh (as stripped of the skin), i.e. (strictly) the meat of an animal (as food), or (by extension) the body (as opposed to the soul (or spirit), or as the symbol of what is external, or as the means of kindred), or (by implication) human nature (with its frailties (physically or morally) and passions), or (specially), a human being (as such); carnal(-ly, + -ly minded), flesh(-ly); probably from the base of g4563 (σαρόω);

the
Strongs:
Word:
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»012:G4561
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

same
Strongs:
Word:
αὐτὴ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Personal pronoun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a reference to a recently mentioned female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
she
Conjoined:
»012:G4561
Tyndale
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
αὐτός, -ή, -ό, determinative pron., in late Gk. much more freq. than in cl. (WM, 178f; Jannaris, HGG, §1399). 1) Emphatic (so always in nom. exc. when preceded by the art, see infr, iii); (1) self (ipse), expressing opposition, distinction, exclusion, etc, αὐ. ἐκχυθήσεται, Luk.5:37; αὐ. ἐγινώσκεν, Jhn.2:25; αὐ.ὑμεῖς, Jhn.3:28; καὶ αὐ. ἐγώ, Rom.15:14; αὐ. Ἰησοῦς, Jhn.2:24; αὐ. καὶ οἱ μετ᾽ αὐτοῦ, Mrk.2:25; ὑμεῖς αὐ, Mrk.6:31; esp. (as freq in cl.) αὐ. ὁ, Mat.3:4, Mrk.6:17, Jhn.16:27, 1Th.3:11, al; in late Gk, sometimes weakened, ἐν αὐτῇ τ. ὥρᾳ, in that hour, Luk.10:21 (M, Pr., 91; MM, see word); (2) emphatic, he, she, it (M, Pr., 86; Bl, §48, 1, 2, 7), Mat.1:21, 12:50, Luk.6:35, al; pointing to some one as master (cl.), Mat.8:24, Mrk.4:38, al; αὐ, καὶ αὐ. = οὗτος, ὁ δε (BL, §48, 1), Mat.14:2, Mrk.14:15, 44, Luk.1:22, 2:28, al. 2) In oblique cases (cl.), for the simple pron. of 3rd of person(s), he, she, it, Mat.7:9, 10:12, 26:44, al; with ptcp. in genitive absol, Mat.9:18, Mrk.13:1, al. (for irreg. constructions, V. Bl, §74, 5); pleonastically after the relative (cf. Heb. אֲשֶׁר לוֹ; WM, 184ff; Bl, §50, 4; MM, see word), Mrk.7:25, Rev.3:8, 7:2, al; in constr. ad sensum, without proper subject expressly indicated, Mat.4:23, Act.8:5, 2Co.2:13, al; genitive αὐτοῦ = ἐκείνου, Rom.11:11, 1Th.2:19, Tit.3:5, Heb.2:4. 3) ὁ, ἡ, τὸ αὐ, the same: Heb.1:12, 13:8; τὸ αὐ, ποιεῖν, Mat.5:46, 47, al; φρονεῖν, Rom.12:16, 15:5, Php.2:2, al; τὰ αὐ, Act.15:27, Rom.2:1, al; κατὰ τὸ (τὰ) αὐ. (MM, see word), Act.14:1, Luk.6:23, al; ἐπὶ τὸ αὐ, together (MM, see word), Mat.22:34, Act.1:15, al; ἓν κ. τὸ αὐ, 1Co.11:5, 12:11; with dative (cl.), 1Co.11:5; with a noun, λόγος, Mrk.14:39; μέτρος, Php.1:30; πνεῦμα, 1Co.12:4. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autos
Gloss:
it/s/he
Morphhology:
Greek, Personal Pronoun
Definition:
αὐτός (Cretan dialect ἀϝτός [Refs] (also αὐτόν[Refs], reflexive pronoun, self:—in oblique cases used for the personal pronoun, him, her, it:—with Article, ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό (also ταὐτόν), etc, the very one, the same. I) self, myself, thyself, etc, accusative to the person of the Verb: frequently joined with ἐγώ, σύ, etc. (see. below 10), I.1) one's true self, the soul, not the body, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; reversely, body, not soul, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; oneself, as opposed to others who are less prominent, as king to subject, [Refs]; man to wife and children, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; warrior to horses, [Refs 8th c.BC+], or to weapons, [Refs]; shepherd to herd, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; seamen to ships, [Refs]: generally, whole to parts,[Refs 5th c.BC+]: absolutely, the Master, as in the [Refs 4th c.BC+] Latin Ipse dixit; so τίς οὗτος;— Αὐτός, i.e. Socrates, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀναβόησον Αὐτόν[Refs]the Master, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the result will show, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially αὐτὸ δείξει[Refs 5th c.BC+]; of things, the very, ὑπὸ λόφον αὐτόν, i.e. just, exactly under, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρὸς αὐταῖς ταῖς θύραις close by the door, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ δέον the very thing needed, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὸ τὸ περίορθρον the point of dawn, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ τὰ ἐναντία the very opposite, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even, οὔ μοι μέλει ἄλγος οὔτ᾽ αὐτῆς Ἑκάβης[Refs 8th c.BC+] —In these senses αὐτός in Prose either precedes both the _Article_ and substantive, or follows both, e.g. αὐτὸς ὁ υἱός or ὁ υἱὸς αὐτός. The Article is sometimes omitted with proper names, or Nouns denoting individuals, αὐτὸς Μένων[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) of oneself, of one's own accord, ἀλλά τις αὐ. ἴτω[Refs 8th c.BC+]; also, in person, τῶν πραγμάτων ὑμῖν. αὐτοῖς ἀντιληπτέον[Refs 4th c.BC+] I.3) by oneself or itself, alone, αὐτός περ ἐών although alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς ἐγείναο παῖδ᾽, i.e. without a mother,[Refs 8th c.BC+]by himself, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ γάρ ἐσμεν we are by ourselves, i.e. among friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτὰ γὰρ ἔστιν ταῦτα these and no others, [Refs 5th c.BC+] himself alone, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸς μόνος, see at {μόνος} II; αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτόν, see at {ἑαυτοῦ}. I.4) in Philosophy, by or in itself, of an abstract concept or idea, δίκαιον αὐτό[Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently in this sense, attached to Nouns of all genders, οὐκ αὐτὸ δικαιοσύνην ἐπαινοῦντες ἀλλὰ τὰς ἀπ᾽ αὐτῆς εὐδοκιμήσεις[Refs 5th c.BC+]; more fully, εἰ αὐτὸ τοῦτο πατέρα ἠρώτων, ἆρα ὁ πατήρ ἐστι πατήρ τινος, ἢ ο; [Refs]; ἀδελφός, αὐτὸ τοῦτο ὅπερ ἔστιν the ideal, abstract brother, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; less frequently agreeing with the substantive, ἵνα αὐτὴ δικαιοσύνη πρὸς ἀδικίαν αὐτὴν κριθείη[Refs 5th c.BC+]its very self, [Refs] I.5) in dative with substantive, in one, together, ἀνόρουσεν αὐτῇ σὺν φόρμιγγι he sprang up lyre in hand, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτῇ σὺν πήληκι κάρη helmet and all,[Refs 8th c.BC+] men and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; αὐτοῖσι συμμάχοισι allies and all, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.6) added to ordinal Numbers, e.g. πέμπτος αὐτός himself the fifth, i. e. himself with four others, [NT+5th c.BC+] I.7) frequently coupled with οὗτος, τοῦτ᾽ αὐτό ἐστι τὸ ζητηθέν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ταῦτα ἥκω αὐτὰ ἵνα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.8) καὶ αὐτός himself too, [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.9) repeated in apodosi for emphasis, αὐτὸς ἐπαγγειλάμενος σώσειν. αὐτὸς ἀπώλεσεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10) in connexion with the person. pronoun, ἐγὼν αὐτός[Refs 8th c.BC+]; followed by an enclitic pronoun, αὐτόν μιν[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.b) with person. pronoun omitted, αὐτός. ἧσθαι λιλαίομαι, for ἐγὼ αὐτός, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αὐτὸν ἐλέησον, for ἐμὲ αὐτόν,[Refs 8th c.BC+] is simply a strengthened form of ο; and so in Attic dialect, when σὲ αὐτόν, ἐμοὶ αὐτῷ, etc, are read divisim, they are emphatic, not reflexive; in this case αὐτός generally precedes the person. pronoun,[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.c) with the reflexive ἑαυτοῦ, αὑτοῦ, etc, to add force and definiteness, αὐτὸς καθ᾽ αὑτοῦ[Refs 4th c.BC+]; αὐτοὶ ὑφ᾽ αὑτῶν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; sometimes between the Article and reflexive pronoun, τοῖς αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ πήμασιν βαρύνεται[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.10.d) αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶν with possessive pronoun, πατρὸς κλέος ἠδ᾽ ἐμὸν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; τοῖς οἷσιν αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.10.e) αὐτὸς ἑαυτοῦ with comparative and superlative adjective, αὐτὸς ἑωυτοῦ ῥέει πολλῷ ὑποδεέστερος[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.11) αὐτός for ὁ αὐτός, the same, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and in later Prose, αὐταῖς ταῖς ἡμέραις[NT+2nd c.AD+] I.12) comparative αὐτότερος[Refs 5th c.BC+]: superlative αὐτότατος his very self, [Refs 5th c.BC+]. adverb, comparative αὐτοτέρως[Refs 2nd c.AD+] II) he, she, it, for the simple pronoun of 3 person, only in oblique cases (except in later Gk, [NT], and rarely first in a sentence, [NT+5th c.BC+]: rare in Epic dialect, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and mostly emphatic,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in Prose, to recall a Noun used earlier in the sentence, ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν βασιλέα. οὐκ οἶδα ὅ τι δεῖ αὐτὸν ὀμόσαι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; after a Relative, ὅς κε θεοῖς ἐπιπείθηται. ἔκλυον αὐτοῦ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially where a second Verb requires a change of case in the pronoun, οἳ ἂν ἐξελεγχθῶσι. ὡς προδότας αὐτοὺς ὄντας τιμωρηθῆναι[Refs 5th c.BC+]; later, pleonastically after a Relative, ὧν ὁ μὲν αὐτῶν[NT+5th c.BC+] III) with Article ὁ αὐτός, ἡ αὐτή, τὸ αὐτό, and Attic dialect contraction αὑτός, αὑτή, ταὐτό and ταὐτόν (as required by the metre,[Refs 5th c.BC+] plural neuter ταὐτ; Ionic dialect ὡυτός, τὠυτό:—the very one, the same, rare in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with dative, to denote sameness or agreement, especially in Prose, τὠυτὸ ἂν ὑμῖν ἐπρήσσομεν[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ αὐτὸς τῷ λίθῳ the same as the stone, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ταὐτῷ εἶναί τινι to be in the place with, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσίεσθαί τινα ἐς ταὐτὸ ἑαυτῷ to have a person meet one,[Refs 5th c.BC+]face to face, [Refs 4th c.AD+] III.2) in later Greek, the said, the above-named, Ἡρώδης ὁ αὐ.[Refs 3rd c.BC+] IV) Adverbial phrases: IV.1) αὐτὸ μόνον simply, merely, [Refs 1st c.AD+] IV.2) αὐτό as adverb, ={ἄρτι}, [Refs] IV.3) αὐτὸ τοῦτο as adverb, [NT+2nd c.BC+] IV.4) with Preps, ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτό added together, making a total, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; κατὰ τὸ αὐτό together, at the same time,[NT], etc; but κατ᾽ αὐτό just then, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) In Compos: V.1) of or by oneself, self-, as in αὐτοδίδακτος, αὐτογνώμων, αὐτόματος: and so, independently, as in αὐτοκράτωρ, αὐτόνομος. V.2) hence, as a second self, very, bodily, as with proper names, Αὐτοθαΐς. V.3) in the abstract, the ideal, see above[Refs] V.4) precisely, as in αὐτόδεκα. V.5) rarely with reflexive sense of ἀλλήλων, as in αὐτοκτονέω. V.6) in one piece with, together with, as in αὐτόκωπος, αὐτοχείλης, αὐτόπρεμνος, αὐτόρριζος. V.7) by itself: hence, only, as in αὐτόξυλος, αὐτόποκος.—For αὐτοῦ, αὐτῶς, etc, see the respective Arts.
Strongs
Word:
αὐτός
Transliteration:
autós
Pronounciation:
ow-tos'
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the reflexive pronoun self, used (alone or in the comparative g1438 (ἑαυτοῦ)) of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other persons; her, it(-self), one, the other, (mine) own, said, (self-), the) same, ((him-, my-, thy- )self, (your-)selves, she, that, their(-s), them(-selves), there(-at, - by, -in, -into, -of, -on, -with), they, (these) things, this (man), those, together, very, which; from the particle (perhaps akin to the base of g109 (ἀήρ) through the idea of a baffling wind) (backward);

flesh,
Strongs:
Word:
σὰρξ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Spellings:
σὰρξ, σάρξ
Additional:
flesh
Tyndale
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, σαρκός, ἡ [in LXX chiefly for בָּשָׂר;] flesh; 1) as in cl. generally, (a) prop, of the soft substance of the animal body: 1Co.15:39, 2Co.12:7, Gal.6:13, al; σ. καὶ αἷμα, 1Co.5:50; σ. καὶ ὀστέα, Luk.24:39; pl, of the flesh of many or parts of the flesh of one (cl.), Rev.17:16 19:18; φαγεῖν, Re, ll. with (cf. κατεσθίειν, 4Ki.9:36, al, and βιβρώσκειν, freq. in l.); metaph, Jas.5:3; mystically, φ. (τρώγειν) τὴν σ. τοῦ υἱοῦ τ. ἀνθρώπου, Jhn.6:52-56; (b) Of the whole substance of the body, = σῶμα: Act.2:26 (LXX), 31, 2Co.12:7, Gal.4:14, Eph.5:29; μία σ, Mrk.10:8; εἰς σ. μίαν (Gen.2:24), Mat.19:5, Mrk.10:8, 1Co.6:16, Eph.5:31; hence, of the material as opp. to the immaterial part of man (cf. Lft, Notes, 88): opp. to πνεῦμα, 1Co.5:5, 2Co.7:1, Col.2:5, 1Pe.3:18, 4:6; to ψύχη, Act.2:31, Rec; of the present life, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Rom.7:5, Gal.2:20, Php.1:22, 24 1Pe.4:2; of Christ's life on earth, αἱ ἡμέραι τ. σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ, Heb.5:7; of things pertaining to the body, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Gal.6:12, 13 Php.3:3, 4. 2) As in Heb. idiom, (a) of a living creature: πᾶσα σ. (Heb. כָּל־בָּשָׂר; cf. Bl, §47, 9), Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, 1Pe.1:24; esp. of man and his mortality (Psa.55 (56):5, Sir.28:5, al.), Jhn.1:14; πᾶσα σ. (see supr.), Luk.3:6, Jhn.17:2, Act.2:17, ἐν σ, 1Jo.4:2, 1Ti.3:16; (b) of natural origin and relationship (Gen.2:24, Isa.58:7, al.): τέκνα τῆς σ, Rom.9:8; κατὰ σάρκα, ib. 3, 5, 1Co.10:18, Gal.4:23, 29; ἡ σ. μου, Rom.11:14 (cf. Jdg.9:2, 2Ki.5:1, al.). 3) Of the physical nature as subject to sensation and desire (Plut.), (a) without any ethical disparagement: Rom.7:18 13:14; opp. to πνεῦμα, Mat.26:41, Mrk.14:38; τ. θέλημα τῆς σ, Jhn.1:13; ἡ ἐπιθυμία τῆς σ, 1Jn.2:16; pl, 2Pe.2:18; παθεῖν σαρκί, 1Pe.4:1; (b) in ethical sense, esp. in Pauline Epp, of the flesh as the seat and vehicle of sinful desires: opp. to νοῦς, Rom.7:25; to πνεῦμα, Rom.8:4-9, 12, 13, Gal.5:16, 17 19 6:8 (cf. DB, ii, 14f; iv, 165f; Cremer, 844ff.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, genitive σαρκός, ἡ, Aeolic dialect σύρξ [Refs]:— flesh, [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in plural, except [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes to represent the whole body, μήτε γῆ δέξαιτό μου σάρκας θανόντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also collectively, of the body, γέροντα τὸν νοῦν, σάρκα δ᾽ ἡβῶσαν φέρει [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σαρκὸς περιβόλαια, ἐνδυτά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] uses singular and plural in much the same manner, ταῖς σαρξὶ σάρκες προσγένωνται [Refs], etc: portions of meat, usually in plural, σάρκας τρεῖς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; but, pieces of flesh or membrane, βήσσοντα. ὥστε σάρκας ἐνπύους. ἀποβάλλειν [Refs] b) εἰς σάρκα πημαίνειν to the quick, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 2) ἡ σ. τοῦ σκύτεος the inner or flesh-side of leather, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) fleshy, pulpy substance of fruit, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) the flesh, as the seat of the affections and lusts, fleshly nature, ἐν τῇ σ. ἡ ἡδονή [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδούλωτον (probable reading) τῇ σαρκὶ καὶ τοῖς ταύτης πάθεσι [Refs 1st c.AD+], compare 101b; frequently in NT, [NT] II.2) in “NT” also, the body, τῆς σαρκὸς πρόνοια [NT], = every-body, [LXX+NT]; οὐ. πᾶσα σάρξ nobody, [NT] II.3) the physical or natural order of things, opposed to the spiritual or supernatural, σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα [NT]; τὸν κύριον τῶν πνευμάτων καὶ πάσης σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] twr[kcirc]- 'portion', cf. Avest. θwar[schwa]s- 'cut'.)
Strongs
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sárx
Pronounciation:
sarx
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
flesh (as stripped of the skin), i.e. (strictly) the meat of an animal (as food), or (by extension) the body (as opposed to the soul (or spirit), or as the symbol of what is external, or as the means of kindred), or (by implication) human nature (with its frailties (physically or morally) and passions), or (specially), a human being (as such); carnal(-ly, + -ly minded), flesh(-ly); probably from the base of g4563 (σαρόω);

but
Strongs:
Word:
ἀλλ᾽
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Spellings:
ἀλλ᾽; ἀλλὰ
Tyndale
Word:
ἀλλά
Transliteration:
alla
Gloss:
but
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
ἀλλά (ἀλλ᾽ usually bef. α and υ, often bef. ε and η, rarely bef. ο and ω, never bef. ι; Tdf, Pr., 93 f; WH, App., 146), adversative particle, stronger than δέ; prop. neuter pl. of ἄλλος, used adverbially, with changed accent; hence prop. otherwise, on the other hand (cf. Rom.3:31); 1) opposing a previous negation, but: οὐ (μὴ). ἀ, Mat.5:15, 17 Mrk.5:39, Jhn.7:16, al; rhetorically subordinating but not entirely negativing what precedes, οὐ. ἀ, not so much. as, Mrk.9:37, Mat.10:20, Jhn.12:44, al; with ellipse of the negation, Mat.11:7-9, Act.19:2, 1Co.3:6 6:11 7:7, 2Co.7:1, Gal.2:3, al; in opposition to a foregoing pos. sentence, ἀ. οὐ, Mat.24:6, 1Co.10:23; οὐ μόνον. ἀ. καί, Jhn.5:18, Rom.1:32, al; elliptically, after a negation, ἀ. ἵνα, Mrk.14:49, Jhn.1:8 9:3, al; = εἰ μή (Bl, §77, 13; M, Pr., 241; but cf. WM, §iii, 10), Mat.20:23, Mrk.4:22. 2) Without previous negation, to express opposition, interruption, transition, etc, but: Jhn.16:20 12:27, Gal.2:14; before commands or requests, Act.10:20 26:16, Mat.9:18, Mrk.9:22, al; to introduce an accessory idea, 2Co.7:11; in the apodosis after a condition or concession with εἰ, ἐάν, εἴπερ, yet, still, at least, Mrk.14:29, 1Co.9:2, 2Co.4:16, Col.2:5, al; after μέν, Act.4:17, Rom.14:20, 1Co.14:17; giving emphasis to the following clause, ἀλλ᾽ ἔρχεται ὥρα, yea, etc, Jhn.16:2; so with neg, ἀλλ᾽ οὐδέ, nay, nor yet, Luk.23:15. 3) Joined with other particles (a practice which increases in late writers; Simcox, LNT, 166), ἀ. γε, yet at least, Luk.24:21, 1Co.9:2; ἄ ἤ, save only, except, Luk.12:51, 2Co.1:13; ἀ. μὲν οὖν, Php.3:8 (on this usage, see MM, VGT, see word). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἀλλά
Transliteration:
alla
Gloss:
but
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
ἀλλά, conjunction, originally neuter plural of ἄλλος, otheruise: used adversatively to limit or oppose words, sentences, or clauses, stronger than δέ: I) in simple oppositions, but, I.1) after negative clauses, οὐ κακός, ἀλλ᾽ ἀγαθός[Refs 8th c.BC+] I.1.b) after a simple negative, ἦ παραφρονεῖ; οὔκ, ἀλλ᾽ ὕπνος μ᾽ ἔχει[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.1.c) frequently after οὐ μόνον, μὴ μόνον, with or without καί, οὐ μόνον ἅπαξ, ἀ. πολλάκις[Refs 5th c.BC+], either, not only. but, μὴ ὅτι ἰδιώτην τινά, ἀλλὰ τὸν μέγαν βασιλέα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; or, not only not. but, οὐχ ὅπως κωλυταὶ. γενήσεσθε, ἀλλὰ καὶ. περιόψεσθε[Refs 5th c.BC+]; the negative form is ἀλλ᾽ οὐδέ, μὴ ὅτι ὑπὲρ ἄλλου, ἀλλ᾽ οὐδὲ ὑπὲρ ἐμαυτοῦ δίκην εἴρηκα[Refs 4th c.BC+] I.2) in the apodosis of hypothetical sentences, still, at least, εἴπερ γάρ τε. ἀλλά τε[Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἰ μή (i.e. ὁρῶ), ἀλλ᾽ ἀκούω γε, [Refs 5th c.BC+] may be in juxtaposition, εἰ ἄλλοις οὐκ εἰμὶ ἀπόστολος, ἀλλά γε ὑμῖν εἰμί[NT+8th c.BC+]; εἰ καὶ μετέχουσι. ἀλλ᾽ οὐ. [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.2.b) after [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐὰν οὖν ἀ. νῦν γ᾽ ἔτι, i.e.ἐὰν οὖν [μὴἄλλοτε], ἀ. νῦν γε. if then now at least ye still, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—without an adverb of Time, at least, ἡ δ᾽ ἀ. πρός σε μικρὸν εἰπάτω μόνον[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.3) sometimes = ἀλλ᾽ ἤ (which see), except, but, οὔτι μοι αἴτιος ἄλλος, ἀ. τοκῆε no one else, but, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: compare reverse process in our word but=be out, except:—sometimes with force of ἤ after comparatives, τάφον, οὐκ ἐν ᾧ κεῖνται μᾶλλον, ἀ.ἐν ᾧ ἡ δόξα κτλ. not that in which they are lying, but far more, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.4) with negative after an affirmative word or clause, to be rendered simply by not, ἀγαθῶν, ἀ. οὐχὶ κακῶν αἴτιον[Refs 5th c.BC+] I.4.b) without negative, μικρὸς μὲν ἔην δέμας, ἀ. μαχητής[Refs 8th c.BC+] II) to oppose whole sentences,but, yet: II.1) frequently in transitions, as [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀ. οὐδ᾽ ὥς. [Refs 8th c.BC+] in answers and objections, nay but, well but, frequently with negatives, especially in making and answering objections, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also in affirmative answers, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—repeated in a succession of questions or objections, πότερον ᾔτουν σέ τι; ἀ. ἀπῄτου; ἀ. περὶ παιδικῶν μαχόμενο; ἀ. μεθύων ἐπαρῴνησ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. μήν, answered by ἀ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) with imperative or subjunctive, to remonstrate, encourage, persuade, etc, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; answered by a second ἀ, ἀ. περιμένετε. ἀ. περιμενοῦμεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to break off a subject abruptly, ἀ. τά γε Ζεὺς οἶδεν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀ. ταῦτα μὲν τί δεῖλέγει; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4) in resuming an address after parenthesis, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.5) in elliptical phrases, οὐ μὴν ἀ, οὐ μέντοι ἀ. it is not [so], but, ὁ ἵππος πίπτει καὶ μικροῦ αὐτὸν ἐξετραχήλισεν· οὐ μὴν [ἐξετραχήλισεν] ἀ. ἐπέμεινεν ὁ Κῦρος it did not however [throw him], but, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) when joined with other Particles, each retains proper force, as, III.1) ἀλλ᾽ ἄρα, used by [Refs 8th c.BC+]; later, to introduce an objection, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in questions,ἀλλ᾽ ἆρα; [Refs] III.2) ἀλλ᾽ οὖν, concessive, at all events, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; well then, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but then, however, with γε following, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.3) ἀλλὰ γάρ, frequently with words between, but really, certainly, as ἀλλὰ γὰρ Κρέοντα λεύσσω, παύσω γόους, but this is irregular for ἀλλά, Κρέοντα γὰρ λεύσσω, παύσω γόους, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; for the regular order[Refs 8th c.BC+] only with negatives, ἀλλ᾽ οὐ γάρ[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀ. γὰρ δή, ἀ. γάρ τοι, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.4) ἀ. εἰ. quid si? [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.5) ἀ. ἦ in questions, chiefly of surprise or remonstrance, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ ἦ, τὸ λεγόμενον, κατόπιν ἑορτῆς ἥκομε; [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.6) ἀ. followed by strengthening Particle, ἀλλ᾽ ἤτοι μὲν ταῦτα θεῶν ἐν γούνασι κεῖται[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλά τοι[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀ. μέντοι, with or without γε, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀ. μήν, see at {μή; ἀ. δή}, mostly with words between, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; without intervening words, [Refs 5th c.BC+] IV) = et quidem, [Refs 6th c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
ἀλλά
Transliteration:
allá
Pronounciation:
al-lah'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
properly, other things, i.e. (adverbially) contrariwise (in many relations); and, but (even), howbeit, indeed, nay, nevertheless, no, notwithstanding, save, therefore, yea, yet; neuter plural of g243 (ἄλλος);

one
Strongs:
Word:
ἄλλη
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
another
Tyndale
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, -η, -ο, (cf. Lat. alius, Eng. else), [in LXX for אַחֵר,אֶחָד, etc;] other, another: absol, Mat.20:3, al; ἄ. δέ, 1Co.3:10 12:8; pl, Mrk.6:15; attached to a noun, Mat.2:12 4:21, al; with art, ὁ ἄ, the other, Mat.5:39, Jhn.19:32 (Bl, §47, 8); οἱ ἄ, the others, the rest, Jhn.20:25, 1Co.14:29; ἄ. πρὸς ἄλλον = πρὸς ἀλλήλους (BL, §48, 10), Act.2:12; ἄλλ᾽ (i.e. ἄλλο) ἤ (Bl, §77, 13), Luk.12:51; before πλήν, Mrk.12:32; εἰ μή, Jhn.6:22; παρά with accusative, 1Co.3:11. SYN.: ἕτερος, which see ἄ. denotes numerical, ἕ. qualitative difference (Cremer, 89). ἄ. generally "denotes simply distinction of individuals, ἕ. involves the secondary idea of difference in kind" (see Lft, Meyer, Ramsay, on Gal.1:6, 7; Tr, Syn., §xcv; BL, §51, 6; M, Pr., 79f, 246; MM, VGT, s.vv.). As to whether the distinction can be maintained in 1Co.12:8, 10 see ICC, in l, and on Heb.11:35 f, see Westc, in l. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, η, ο, [Refs 5th c.AD+] yος, cf. Latin alius):—another, i. e. one besides what has been mentioned, either adjective or pronoun: when adjective, its substantive is either in the same case, or in genitive, Ζεῦ ἄλλοι τε θεοί[Refs 8th c.BC+] —ἄ. μέν. ἄ. δέ. one. another, more rarely the one. the other. (of two persons, etc.), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ μέν. ἄλλα δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+], and Attic dialect; ἕτερον μέν. ἄλλον δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄλλο μέν. ἑτέρου δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) with τις, any other, οὐδέ τις ἄ. ἔγνω ἀλλ᾽ ἄρα Κασσάνδρη[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐδεὶς ἄ. no other, [Refs]; ἄλλα πολλά[Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) frequently with another of its own cases or derived Adverbs, ἄ. ἄλλα λέγει one man says one thing, one another, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see at {ἄλλοθεν, ἄλλοσε, ἄλλοτε}; also with Verb in plural, παραλαμβάνων ἄ. ἄλλον ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου, τὸν δ᾽ ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου χρείᾳ. ἐθέμεθα πόλιν ὄνομα[Refs 5th c.BC+] when the several parties are plural, λείπουσι τὸν λόφον. ἄλλοι ἄλλοθεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) ἄ. καὶ ἄ, one and then another, one or two, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλο καὶ ἄλλο one thing after another, [Refs]; πρὸς ἄλλὡ καὶ ἄλλὡ σημείὡ to different points, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.4) repeated for emphasis, ἄ. ἄ. τρόπος quite another sort, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.5) οὐδ᾽ ἄ. for οὐδέτερος, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.6) with Article, ὁ ἄλλος, the rest, all besides; in plural, οἱ ἄλλοι (Ionic dialect contraction ὧλλοι) all the others, the rest, frequently from [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ ἄλλα, contraction τἆλλα, all else, τἆλλα πλὴν ὁ χρυσός[Refs]; in Attic dialect frequently as adverb, for the rest, especially in amendments to decrees, τὰ μὲν ἄλλα καθάπερ ὁ δεῖνα κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ ἄ. χρόνος, ={ὁ λοιπὸς χρόνος}, of the future, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but also of the past, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῇ ἄλλῃ ἡμέρᾳ, τῷ ἄλλῳ ἔτει, next day, next year, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἵτε ἄλλοι καί. all others and especially, γυναῖκας ἄλλας τε πολλὰς καὶ δὴκαὶ βασιλέος θυγατέρα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλα τε δὴ εἶπε, καί. [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τὸ ἄλλο is much less frequently than τὰ ἄλλα. II.7) with Numerals, yet, still, further, τρίτον ἄ. γένος[Refs 8th c.BC+]; πέμπτος ποταμὸς ἄ. yet a fifth river, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) in enumerations, as well, besides, ἅμα τῇγε καὶ ἀμφίπολοι κίον ἄλλαι with her their mistress came attendants also, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν χόρτος οὐδὲ ἄ. δένδρον οὐδέν there was no grass nor any tree at all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσοφλὼν οὐ τὴν ἐπωβελίαν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ ἄλλην ὕβριν besides, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with comparative, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with superlative, ὀϊζυρώτατος ἄλλων[Refs 8th c.BC+] III) less frequently, ={ἀλλοῖος}, of other sort, different, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.2) in this sense, with genitive, ἄλλα τῶν δικαίων other than just, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —followed by ἤ, with preceding _negative_, οὐδὲ ἄλλο, οὐδὲν ἄλλο (or ἄλλο οὐδέν), ἤ. nothing else than, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μηδὲν ἄλλο ἢ διανεῖταί τις which one only thinks, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἄλλογ᾽ ἢπόνοι; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ἄλλο (i.e. ἐποίησαν) ἢ ἐπεβούλευσα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by Preps, πρό.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀντί. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; παρά. [Refs 8th c.BC+] —see also ἄλλο τι. III.3) other than what is, untrue, unreal, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.4) other than right, wrong, bad, ἄλλου τινος ἡττῆσθαι yield to some unworthy motive, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; compare ἄλλως.
Strongs
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
állos
Pronounciation:
al'-los
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
"else," i.e. different (in many applications); more, one (another), (an-, some an-)other(-s, -wise); a primary word;

indeed
Strongs:
Word:
μὲν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Particle or Disjunctive Particle
Grammar:
introducing an alternative
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
on one hand
Tyndale
Word:
μέν
Transliteration:
men
Gloss:
on the other hand
Morphhology:
Greek, Particle
Definition:
μέν, conjunctive particle (originally a form of μήν), usually related to a following δέ or other adversative conjunction, and distinguishing the word or clause with which it stands from that which follows. It is generally untranslatable and is not nearly so frequent in NT as in cl. Like δέ, it never stands first in a clause. 1) Answered by δέ or some other particle: μὲν. δέ, indeed. but, Mat.3:11, Luk.3:16, al; with pronouns, ὃς μὲν. ὃς δέ, one. another, Mat.21:35, al; pl, Php.1:16, 17; ὃ μὲν. ὃ δὲ. ὃ δέ, some. some. some, Mat.13:8; τοῦτο μὲν. τοῦτο δέ, partly. partly, Heb.10:33; μὲν. ἔπειτα, Jhn.11:6; μὲν. καί, Luk.8:5. 2) μέν solitarium, answered by no other particle: πρῶτον μέν (Bl, l.with), Rom.1:8 3:2, 1Co.11:18; μὲν οὖν in narrative, summing up what precedes or introducing something further (Bl, §78, 5), so then, rather, nay rather: Luk.11:28 (WH, μενοῦν), Act.1:6 9:31, al; μὲν οὖν γε (Php.3:8, WH): see: μενοῦνγε. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
μέν
Transliteration:
men
Gloss:
on the other hand
Morphhology:
Greek, Particle
Definition:
μέν, Particle, used partly to express certainty on the part of the speaker or writer; partly, and more commonly, to point out that the word or clause with which it stands is correlative to another word or clause that is to follow, the latter word or clause being introduced by δέ. A) A.I) μέν used absolutely to express certainty, not followed by correlative δέ, indeed, of a truth, synonymous with μήν, as appears from the Epic dialect and Ionic dialect form ἦ μέν in protestations and oaths (where Attic dialect used ἦ μήν), καί μοι ὄμοσσον, ἦ μ. μοι πρόφρων ἔπεσιν καὶ χερσὶν ἀρήξειν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Trag, ἀκτὴ μὲν ἥδε τῆς περιρρύτου χθονός [Refs 8th c.BC+]; γε μέν, compare γε [Refs] A.I.2) an answering clause with δέ is sometimes implied, τὴν μὲν ἐγὼ σπουδῇ δάμνημ᾽ ἐπέεσσι her can I hardly subdue, [but all others easily], [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς μὲν λέγουσι as indeed they say, [but as I believe not], [Refs 5th c.BC+]; καὶ πρῶτον μὲν ἦν αὐτῷ πόλεμος (with no ἔπειτα δέ to follow), [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so νῦν μέν σ᾽ ἀφήσω I will let you go this time, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]: to give force to assertions made by a person respecting himself, wherein opposition to other persons is implied, ὡς μὲν ἐμῷ θυμῷ δοκεῖ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; δοκεῖν μέν μοι ἥξει τήμερον [τὸ πλοῖον] [Refs 5th c.BC+]: hence with the person pronoun, ἐγὼ μέν νυν θεοῖσι ἔχω χάριν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐγὼ μὲν οὐδέν (i.e. θέλω) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with the demonstrative pronoun, τούτου μὲν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐγὼ σοφώτερός εἰμι [Refs 5th c.BC+] great indeed has been the change, [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.I.3) μέν is used alone in questions, when the answer is assumed, I take it, θέμις μὲν ἡμᾶς χρησμὸν εἰδέναι θεο; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἕλλην μέν ἐστι καὶ Ἑλληνίζε; [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II) μέν followed by δέ in the correlative clause or clauses, on the one hand, on the other hand; commonly in Classical Gr, less frequently in later Gr. (rare in NT A.II.1) μέν, δέ. (or when the correlative clause is negative, μέν, οὐδέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+], to mark opposition, [Refs 8th c.BC+]—The opposed clauses commonly stand together, but are frequently separated by clauses, parenthetic or explanatory; e.g. μέν in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in [Refs 5th c.BC+] in <[Refs] A.II.2) to connect a series of clauses containing different matter, though with no opposition, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τότε μέν, τότε δέ, at one time, at another, [Refs] ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ; τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, etc. A.II.3) the principal word is frequently repeated, οἳ περὶ μὲν βουλὴν Δαναῶν, περὶ δ᾽ ἐστὲ μάχεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χαλεπαίνει μὲν πρῳρεύς, χαλεπαίνει δὲ κυβερνήτης [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.4) one of the correlative clauses is sometimes independent, while the other takes the participle or some other dependent form, ἐβλασφήμει κατ᾽ ἐμοῦ, μάρτυρα μὲν. οὐδένα παρασχόμενος, παρεκελεύετο δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] b. A.II.5) μέν and δέ frequently oppose two clauses, whereof one is subordinate to the other in meaning or emphasis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so in an anacoluthon, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.II.6) μέν is not always answered by δέ, but frequently by other equivalent Particles, as ἀλλά, Refs 8th c.BC+] in Epic dialect, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρῶτον μέν, μετὰ τοῦτο. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μάλιστα μὲν δὴ, ἔπειτα μέντοι. [Refs 5th c.BC+] —rarely by μήν with negative, οὐδὲν μὴν κωλύει [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.6.b) when the opposition is emphatic, δέ is sometimes strengthened, as ὅμως δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δ᾽ αὖ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; δ᾽ ἔμπης. [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.II.6.c) μέν is sometimes answered by a copulative Particle, κάρτιστοι μὲν ἔσαν καὶ καρτίστοις ἐμάχοντο[Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: rarely in Prose, τρία μὲν ἔτη ἀντεῖχον, καὶ οὐ πρότερον ἐνέδοσαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) μέν before other Particles: B.I) where each Particle retains its force, B.I.1) μὲν ἄρα, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2) μὲν γάρ [Refs 8th c.BC+] there is frequently no second clause, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.3) μέν γε, when a general statement is explained in detail, Κορινθίοις μέν γε ἔνσπονδοί ἐστε [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.4) μὲν δή [Refs 8th c.BC+]: frequently used to express positive certainty, ἀλλ᾽ οἶσθα μὲν δή [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially as a conclusion, τοῦτο μὲν δὴ. ὁμολογεῖται [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in closing a statement, τοιαῦτα μὲν δὴ ταῦτα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ μὲν δή, to deny positively, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὔ τι μὲν δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) μὲν οὖν, see below 11.2. B.II) where the Particles combine so as to form a new sense, B.II.1) μέν γε at all events, at any rate (not in Trag.), τοῦτο μέν γ᾽ ἤδη σαφές [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) μὲν οὖν is frequently used with a corresponding δέ, so that each Particle retains its force, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently also absolutely, so then, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; especially in replies, sometimes in strong affirmation, παντάπασι μὲν οὖν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also to substitute a new statement so as to correct a preceding statement, nay rather, κακοδαίμω; Answ. βαρυδαίμων μὲν οὖν! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μου πρὸς τὴν κεφαλὴν ἀποψῶ wipe your nose on my head: Answ. ἐμοῦ μὲν οὖν. nay on mine, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare οὐμενοῦν: in “NT” μενοῦν and μενοῦνγε", to begin a sentence, yea rather, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) by μέν τε, if δέ τε follows, the two clauses are more closely combined than by τε, τε, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἀλλά, αὐτάρ,[Refs 8th c.BC+]; perhaps by ἠδέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] absolutely, when τε loses its force, as after ἦ, τίς, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.II.4) μέν τοι in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always occurs in speeches, where τοι can be regarded as the dative of the pronoun: later, μέντοι is written as a single word, and is used: B.II.4.a) with a conjunctive force, yet, nevertheless, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and sometimes stands for δέ, answering to μέν, see above [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.4.b) as an adverb, in strong protestations, οὐ μέντοι μὰ Δία[Refs 4th c.BC+]; in eager or positive assent, of course, φαμέν τι εἶναι; Answ. φαμὲν μέντοι νὴ Δία [Refs 5th c.BC+]; why, are you not? [Refs]; τί μ. πρῶτον ἦν, τί πρῶτον ἦ; nay what was the first? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; σὺ μέντοι. [Refs 2nd c.AD+] only take heed, [Refs 5th c.BC+] nay it would be absurd, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; summing up a long temporal clause, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.4.c) μέντοι γε [Refs 5th c.BC+] stands first in the sentence, μ. οὐ θέλω [Refs 1st c.AD+]; also γε μέντοι [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.4.d) καὶ μ. καί is used to add a point to be noted, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also καί. μ, νῦν σοι καιρός ἐστιν ἐπιδείξασθαι τὴν παιδείαν, καὶ φυλάξασθαι μέντοι. and of course to take care, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.4.e) ἀλλὰ μέντοι well, if it comes to that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; well, of course, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare μέντον. C) for μέν after other Particles, see each Particle. D) Position of μέν. Like δέ, it usually stands as the second word in a sentence. But when a sentence begins with words common to its subordinate clauses, μέν stands second in the first of these clauses, as ἥδε γὰρ γυνὴ δούλη μέν, εἴρηκεν δ᾽ ἐλεύθερον λόγον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἱ Ἀθηναῖοι ἐτάξαντο μέν, ἡσύχαζον δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+], even when these do not stand first: sometimes however it precedes them, ὡς μὲν ἐγὼ οἶμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]. It generally stands between the Article and Noun, or the preposition and its Case: but if special stress is laid on the Noun, this is sometimes neglected, as οἱ Τεγεᾶται μὲν ἐπηυλίσαντο, Μαντινῆς δὲ ἀπεχώρησαν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνὰ τὸ σκοτεινὸν μέν. [Refs 5th c.BC+]. D.II) μέν is frequently repeated: D.II.1) when, besides the opposition of two main clauses, a subordinate opposition is introduced into the first, ὁ μὲν ἀνὴρ τοιαῦτα μὲν πεποίηκε τοιαῦτα δὲ λέγει, ὑμῶν δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II.2) in apodosi with the demonstrative pronoun or adverb, τὸν μὲν καλέουσι θέρος, τοῦτον μὲν προσκυνέουσι, τὸν δὲ χειμῶνα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅτε μέν με οἱ ἄρχοντες ἔταττον, τότε μὲν ἔμενον, τοῦ δὲ θεοῦ τάττοντος. ἐνταῦθα δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II.3) μέν used absolutely is frequently followed by a correlative μέν, εἰ μὲν οὖν ἡμεῖς μὲν. ποιοῦμεν [Refs] D.III) μέν is sometimes omitted (especially in Poetry) where it is implied in the following δέ, φεύγων, ὁ δ᾽ ὄπισθε διώκων [Refs 8th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
μέν
Transliteration:
mén
Pronounciation:
men
Language:
Greek
Definition:
properly, indicative of affirmation or concession (in fact); usually followed by a contrasted clause with g1161 (δέ) (this one, the former, etc.); even, indeed, so, some, truly, verily; a primary particle;

flesh
Strongs:
Word:
σὰρξ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated in the KJV (Textus Receptus), but not in most modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, σαρκός, ἡ [in LXX chiefly for בָּשָׂר;] flesh; 1) as in cl. generally, (a) prop, of the soft substance of the animal body: 1Co.15:39, 2Co.12:7, Gal.6:13, al; σ. καὶ αἷμα, 1Co.5:50; σ. καὶ ὀστέα, Luk.24:39; pl, of the flesh of many or parts of the flesh of one (cl.), Rev.17:16 19:18; φαγεῖν, Re, ll. with (cf. κατεσθίειν, 4Ki.9:36, al, and βιβρώσκειν, freq. in l.); metaph, Jas.5:3; mystically, φ. (τρώγειν) τὴν σ. τοῦ υἱοῦ τ. ἀνθρώπου, Jhn.6:52-56; (b) Of the whole substance of the body, = σῶμα: Act.2:26 (LXX), 31, 2Co.12:7, Gal.4:14, Eph.5:29; μία σ, Mrk.10:8; εἰς σ. μίαν (Gen.2:24), Mat.19:5, Mrk.10:8, 1Co.6:16, Eph.5:31; hence, of the material as opp. to the immaterial part of man (cf. Lft, Notes, 88): opp. to πνεῦμα, 1Co.5:5, 2Co.7:1, Col.2:5, 1Pe.3:18, 4:6; to ψύχη, Act.2:31, Rec; of the present life, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Rom.7:5, Gal.2:20, Php.1:22, 24 1Pe.4:2; of Christ's life on earth, αἱ ἡμέραι τ. σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ, Heb.5:7; of things pertaining to the body, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Gal.6:12, 13 Php.3:3, 4. 2) As in Heb. idiom, (a) of a living creature: πᾶσα σ. (Heb. כָּל־בָּשָׂר; cf. Bl, §47, 9), Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, 1Pe.1:24; esp. of man and his mortality (Psa.55 (56):5, Sir.28:5, al.), Jhn.1:14; πᾶσα σ. (see supr.), Luk.3:6, Jhn.17:2, Act.2:17, ἐν σ, 1Jo.4:2, 1Ti.3:16; (b) of natural origin and relationship (Gen.2:24, Isa.58:7, al.): τέκνα τῆς σ, Rom.9:8; κατὰ σάρκα, ib. 3, 5, 1Co.10:18, Gal.4:23, 29; ἡ σ. μου, Rom.11:14 (cf. Jdg.9:2, 2Ki.5:1, al.). 3) Of the physical nature as subject to sensation and desire (Plut.), (a) without any ethical disparagement: Rom.7:18 13:14; opp. to πνεῦμα, Mat.26:41, Mrk.14:38; τ. θέλημα τῆς σ, Jhn.1:13; ἡ ἐπιθυμία τῆς σ, 1Jn.2:16; pl, 2Pe.2:18; παθεῖν σαρκί, 1Pe.4:1; (b) in ethical sense, esp. in Pauline Epp, of the flesh as the seat and vehicle of sinful desires: opp. to νοῦς, Rom.7:25; to πνεῦμα, Rom.8:4-9, 12, 13, Gal.5:16, 17 19 6:8 (cf. DB, ii, 14f; iv, 165f; Cremer, 844ff.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, genitive σαρκός, ἡ, Aeolic dialect σύρξ [Refs]:— flesh, [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in plural, except [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes to represent the whole body, μήτε γῆ δέξαιτό μου σάρκας θανόντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also collectively, of the body, γέροντα τὸν νοῦν, σάρκα δ᾽ ἡβῶσαν φέρει [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σαρκὸς περιβόλαια, ἐνδυτά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] uses singular and plural in much the same manner, ταῖς σαρξὶ σάρκες προσγένωνται [Refs], etc: portions of meat, usually in plural, σάρκας τρεῖς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; but, pieces of flesh or membrane, βήσσοντα. ὥστε σάρκας ἐνπύους. ἀποβάλλειν [Refs] b) εἰς σάρκα πημαίνειν to the quick, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 2) ἡ σ. τοῦ σκύτεος the inner or flesh-side of leather, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) fleshy, pulpy substance of fruit, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) the flesh, as the seat of the affections and lusts, fleshly nature, ἐν τῇ σ. ἡ ἡδονή [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδούλωτον (probable reading) τῇ σαρκὶ καὶ τοῖς ταύτης πάθεσι [Refs 1st c.AD+], compare 101b; frequently in NT, [NT] II.2) in “NT” also, the body, τῆς σαρκὸς πρόνοια [NT], = every-body, [LXX+NT]; οὐ. πᾶσα σάρξ nobody, [NT] II.3) the physical or natural order of things, opposed to the spiritual or supernatural, σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα [NT]; τὸν κύριον τῶν πνευμάτων καὶ πάσης σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] twr[kcirc]- 'portion', cf. Avest. θwar[schwa]s- 'cut'.)
Strongs
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sárx
Pronounciation:
sarx
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
flesh (as stripped of the skin), i.e. (strictly) the meat of an animal (as food), or (by extension) the body (as opposed to the soul (or spirit), or as the symbol of what is external, or as the means of kindred), or (by implication) human nature (with its frailties (physically or morally) and passions), or (specially), a human being (as such); carnal(-ly, + -ly minded), flesh(-ly); probably from the base of g4563 (σαρόω);

of men,
Strongs:
Word:
ἀνθρώπων
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Plural Masculine
Grammar:
male PEOPLE OR THINGS that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
humans
Tyndale
Word:
ἄνθρωπος
Transliteration:
anthrōpos
Gloss:
a human
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
ἄνθρωπος, -ου, ὁ, [in LXX chiefly for אִישׁ,אָדָם, also for אֱנוֹשׁ, etc;] man: 1) generically, a human being, male or female (Lat. homo): Jhn.16:21; with art, Mat.4:4 12:35, Mrk.2:27, Jhn.2:25, Rom.7:1, al; disting. from God, Mat.19:6, Jhn.10:33, Col.3:23, al; from animals, etc, Mat.4:19, Luk.5:10, Rev.9:4, al; implying human frailty and imperfection, 1Co.3:4; σοφία ἀνθρώπων, 1Co.2:5; ἀνθρώπων ἐπιθυμίαι, 1Pe.4:2; κατὰ ἄνθρωπον περιπατεῖν, 1Co.3:3; κατὰ ἄ. λέγειν (λαλεῖν), Rom.3:5, 1Co.9:8; κατὰ ἄ- λέγειν, Gal.3:15 (cf. 1Co.15:32, Gal.1:11); by meton, of man's nature or condition, ὁ ἔσω (ἔξω) ἄ, Rom.7:22, Eph.3:16, 2Co.4:16 (cf. 1Pe.3:4); ὁ παλαιὸς, καινὸς, νέος ἄ, Rom.6:6, Eph.2:15 4:22, 24 Col.3:9, 10; joined with another subst, ἄ. ἔμπορος, a merchant, Mat.13:45 (WH, txt. om. ἄ.); οἰκοδεσπότης, Mat.13:52; βασιλεύς, 18:23; φάγος, 11:19; with name of nation, Κυρηναῖος, Mat.27:32; Ἰουδαῖος, Act.21:39; Ῥωμαῖος, Act.16:37; pl. οἱ ἄ, men, people: Mat.5:13, 16 Mrk.8:24, Jhn.4:28; οὐδεὶς ἀνθρώπων, Mrk.11:2, 1Ti.6:16. 2) Indef, ἄ. = τις, some one, a man: Mat.17:14, Mrk.12:1, al; τις ἄ, Mat.18:12, Jhn.5:5, al; indef. one (Fr. on), Rom.3:28, Gal.2:16, al; opp. to women, servants, etc, Mat.10:36 19:10, Jhn.7:22, 23. 3) Definitely, with art, of some particular person; Mat.12:13, Mrk.3:5, al; οὗτος ὁ ἄ, Luk.14:30; ὁ ἄ οὗτος, ἐκεῖνος, Mrk.14:71, Mat.12:45; ὁ ἄ. τ. ἀνομίας, 2Th.2:3; ἄ τ. θεοῦ (of Heb. אִישׁ אֱלֹהִים), 1Ti.6:11, 2Ti.3:17, 2Pe.1:21; ὁ υἰὸς τοῦ ἀ, see: υἱός. SYN.: ἀνήρ, which see (and cf. MM, VGT, 44; Cremer, 103, 635). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄνθρωπος
Transliteration:
anthrōpos
Gloss:
a human
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
ἄνθρωπος, ἡ, Attic dialect crasis ἅνθρωπος, Ionic dialect ὥνθρωπος, for ὁ ἄνθρ:— man, both as a generic term and of individuals, [Refs 8th c.BC+], opposed to gods, ἀθανάτων τε θεῶν χαμαὶ ἐρχομένων τ᾽ ἀνθρώπων[Refs 8th c.BC+]; πρὸς ἠοίων ἢ ἑσπερίων ἀνθρώπων the men of the east or of the west, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; even of the dead in the Isles of the Blest,[Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) [Refs 5th c.BC+] uses it both with and without the Article to denote man generically, ὁ ἄ. θείας μετέσχε μοίρας[Refs]; ὁ ἄ. the ideal man, humanity, ἀπώλεσας τὸν ἄ, οὐκ ἐπλήρωσας τὴν ἐπαγγελίαν[Refs 2nd c.AD+] 3) in plural, mankind, ἀνθρώπων. ἀνδρῶν ἠδὲ γυναικῶν[Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐξἀνθρώπων γίγνεσθαι depart this life, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 3.b) joined with a superlative to increase its force, δεινότατον τῶν ἐν ἀνθρώποις ἁπάντων[Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ ἄριστος ἐν ἀνθρώποις ὄρτυξ the best quail in the world, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently without a preposition, μάλιστα, ἥκιστα ἀνθρώπων, most or least of all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄριστά γ᾽ ἀ, ὀρθότατα ἀ, [Refs] 3.c) τὰ ἐξ ἀνθρώπων πράγματα 'all the trouble in the world',[Refs 5th c.BC+] 4) joined with another substantive, like{ἀνήρ}, ἄ. ὁδίτης [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with names of nations, πόλις Μερόπων ἀνθρώπων[Refs]; in Attic dialect frequently in a contemptuous sense, ἄ. ὑπογραμματεύς, ἄ. γόης, ἄ. συκοφάντης, [NT+5th c.BC+] 5) ἅνθρωπος or ὁ ἄνθρωπος alone, the man, the fellow, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with a sense of pity, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 6) in the vocative frequently in a contemptuous sense, as when addressed to slaves, etc, ἄνθρωπε or ὤνθρωπε sirrah! you sir! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; simply, brother, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 7) slave, ἂν ἄ. ᾖ[Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ ἄ. τῆς ἁμαρτίας or ἀνομίας[NT]; but τιθέναι τινὰ ἐν ἀνθρώποις make a man of, of a freed slave, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] 8) ἄ. ἄ. any one, Hebraism in [LXX]; ἄ. like [Refs 1st c.BC+] man 'one', [NT] 9) in Medicine texts, name of a plaster, ἡ διὰ σάνδυκος ἄ. καλουμένη[Refs 6th c.AD+] II) as feminine, woman, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; contemptuously, of female slaves, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with a sense of pity, [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Prop. opposed to θηρίον, compare ἀνή; but opposed to γυνή, [LXX+4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἄνθρωπος
Transliteration:
ánthrōpos
Pronounciation:
anth'-ro-pos
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
from g3700 (ὀπτάνομαι)); man-faced, i.e. a human being; certain, man; from g435 (ἀνήρ) and (the countenance;

another
Strongs:
Word:
ἄλλη
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, -η, -ο, (cf. Lat. alius, Eng. else), [in LXX for אַחֵר,אֶחָד, etc;] other, another: absol, Mat.20:3, al; ἄ. δέ, 1Co.3:10 12:8; pl, Mrk.6:15; attached to a noun, Mat.2:12 4:21, al; with art, ὁ ἄ, the other, Mat.5:39, Jhn.19:32 (Bl, §47, 8); οἱ ἄ, the others, the rest, Jhn.20:25, 1Co.14:29; ἄ. πρὸς ἄλλον = πρὸς ἀλλήλους (BL, §48, 10), Act.2:12; ἄλλ᾽ (i.e. ἄλλο) ἤ (Bl, §77, 13), Luk.12:51; before πλήν, Mrk.12:32; εἰ μή, Jhn.6:22; παρά with accusative, 1Co.3:11. SYN.: ἕτερος, which see ἄ. denotes numerical, ἕ. qualitative difference (Cremer, 89). ἄ. generally "denotes simply distinction of individuals, ἕ. involves the secondary idea of difference in kind" (see Lft, Meyer, Ramsay, on Gal.1:6, 7; Tr, Syn., §xcv; BL, §51, 6; M, Pr., 79f, 246; MM, VGT, s.vv.). As to whether the distinction can be maintained in 1Co.12:8, 10 see ICC, in l, and on Heb.11:35 f, see Westc, in l. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, η, ο, [Refs 5th c.AD+] yος, cf. Latin alius):—another, i. e. one besides what has been mentioned, either adjective or pronoun: when adjective, its substantive is either in the same case, or in genitive, Ζεῦ ἄλλοι τε θεοί[Refs 8th c.BC+] —ἄ. μέν. ἄ. δέ. one. another, more rarely the one. the other. (of two persons, etc.), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ μέν. ἄλλα δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+], and Attic dialect; ἕτερον μέν. ἄλλον δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄλλο μέν. ἑτέρου δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) with τις, any other, οὐδέ τις ἄ. ἔγνω ἀλλ᾽ ἄρα Κασσάνδρη[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐδεὶς ἄ. no other, [Refs]; ἄλλα πολλά[Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) frequently with another of its own cases or derived Adverbs, ἄ. ἄλλα λέγει one man says one thing, one another, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see at {ἄλλοθεν, ἄλλοσε, ἄλλοτε}; also with Verb in plural, παραλαμβάνων ἄ. ἄλλον ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου, τὸν δ᾽ ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου χρείᾳ. ἐθέμεθα πόλιν ὄνομα[Refs 5th c.BC+] when the several parties are plural, λείπουσι τὸν λόφον. ἄλλοι ἄλλοθεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) ἄ. καὶ ἄ, one and then another, one or two, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλο καὶ ἄλλο one thing after another, [Refs]; πρὸς ἄλλὡ καὶ ἄλλὡ σημείὡ to different points, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.4) repeated for emphasis, ἄ. ἄ. τρόπος quite another sort, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.5) οὐδ᾽ ἄ. for οὐδέτερος, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.6) with Article, ὁ ἄλλος, the rest, all besides; in plural, οἱ ἄλλοι (Ionic dialect contraction ὧλλοι) all the others, the rest, frequently from [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ ἄλλα, contraction τἆλλα, all else, τἆλλα πλὴν ὁ χρυσός[Refs]; in Attic dialect frequently as adverb, for the rest, especially in amendments to decrees, τὰ μὲν ἄλλα καθάπερ ὁ δεῖνα κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ ἄ. χρόνος, ={ὁ λοιπὸς χρόνος}, of the future, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but also of the past, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῇ ἄλλῃ ἡμέρᾳ, τῷ ἄλλῳ ἔτει, next day, next year, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἵτε ἄλλοι καί. all others and especially, γυναῖκας ἄλλας τε πολλὰς καὶ δὴκαὶ βασιλέος θυγατέρα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλα τε δὴ εἶπε, καί. [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τὸ ἄλλο is much less frequently than τὰ ἄλλα. II.7) with Numerals, yet, still, further, τρίτον ἄ. γένος[Refs 8th c.BC+]; πέμπτος ποταμὸς ἄ. yet a fifth river, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) in enumerations, as well, besides, ἅμα τῇγε καὶ ἀμφίπολοι κίον ἄλλαι with her their mistress came attendants also, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν χόρτος οὐδὲ ἄ. δένδρον οὐδέν there was no grass nor any tree at all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσοφλὼν οὐ τὴν ἐπωβελίαν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ ἄλλην ὕβριν besides, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with comparative, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with superlative, ὀϊζυρώτατος ἄλλων[Refs 8th c.BC+] III) less frequently, ={ἀλλοῖος}, of other sort, different, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.2) in this sense, with genitive, ἄλλα τῶν δικαίων other than just, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —followed by ἤ, with preceding _negative_, οὐδὲ ἄλλο, οὐδὲν ἄλλο (or ἄλλο οὐδέν), ἤ. nothing else than, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μηδὲν ἄλλο ἢ διανεῖταί τις which one only thinks, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἄλλογ᾽ ἢπόνοι; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ἄλλο (i.e. ἐποίησαν) ἢ ἐπεβούλευσα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by Preps, πρό.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀντί. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; παρά. [Refs 8th c.BC+] —see also ἄλλο τι. III.3) other than what is, untrue, unreal, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.4) other than right, wrong, bad, ἄλλου τινος ἡττῆσθαι yield to some unworthy motive, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; compare ἄλλως.
Strongs
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
állos
Pronounciation:
al'-los
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
"else," i.e. different (in many applications); more, one (another), (an-, some an-)other(-s, -wise); a primary word;

however
Strongs:
Word:
δὲ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
and
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most freq. without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative);

flesh
Strongs:
Word:
σὰρξ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, σαρκός, ἡ [in LXX chiefly for בָּשָׂר;] flesh; 1) as in cl. generally, (a) prop, of the soft substance of the animal body: 1Co.15:39, 2Co.12:7, Gal.6:13, al; σ. καὶ αἷμα, 1Co.5:50; σ. καὶ ὀστέα, Luk.24:39; pl, of the flesh of many or parts of the flesh of one (cl.), Rev.17:16 19:18; φαγεῖν, Re, ll. with (cf. κατεσθίειν, 4Ki.9:36, al, and βιβρώσκειν, freq. in l.); metaph, Jas.5:3; mystically, φ. (τρώγειν) τὴν σ. τοῦ υἱοῦ τ. ἀνθρώπου, Jhn.6:52-56; (b) Of the whole substance of the body, = σῶμα: Act.2:26 (LXX), 31, 2Co.12:7, Gal.4:14, Eph.5:29; μία σ, Mrk.10:8; εἰς σ. μίαν (Gen.2:24), Mat.19:5, Mrk.10:8, 1Co.6:16, Eph.5:31; hence, of the material as opp. to the immaterial part of man (cf. Lft, Notes, 88): opp. to πνεῦμα, 1Co.5:5, 2Co.7:1, Col.2:5, 1Pe.3:18, 4:6; to ψύχη, Act.2:31, Rec; of the present life, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Rom.7:5, Gal.2:20, Php.1:22, 24 1Pe.4:2; of Christ's life on earth, αἱ ἡμέραι τ. σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ, Heb.5:7; of things pertaining to the body, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Gal.6:12, 13 Php.3:3, 4. 2) As in Heb. idiom, (a) of a living creature: πᾶσα σ. (Heb. כָּל־בָּשָׂר; cf. Bl, §47, 9), Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, 1Pe.1:24; esp. of man and his mortality (Psa.55 (56):5, Sir.28:5, al.), Jhn.1:14; πᾶσα σ. (see supr.), Luk.3:6, Jhn.17:2, Act.2:17, ἐν σ, 1Jo.4:2, 1Ti.3:16; (b) of natural origin and relationship (Gen.2:24, Isa.58:7, al.): τέκνα τῆς σ, Rom.9:8; κατὰ σάρκα, ib. 3, 5, 1Co.10:18, Gal.4:23, 29; ἡ σ. μου, Rom.11:14 (cf. Jdg.9:2, 2Ki.5:1, al.). 3) Of the physical nature as subject to sensation and desire (Plut.), (a) without any ethical disparagement: Rom.7:18 13:14; opp. to πνεῦμα, Mat.26:41, Mrk.14:38; τ. θέλημα τῆς σ, Jhn.1:13; ἡ ἐπιθυμία τῆς σ, 1Jn.2:16; pl, 2Pe.2:18; παθεῖν σαρκί, 1Pe.4:1; (b) in ethical sense, esp. in Pauline Epp, of the flesh as the seat and vehicle of sinful desires: opp. to νοῦς, Rom.7:25; to πνεῦμα, Rom.8:4-9, 12, 13, Gal.5:16, 17 19 6:8 (cf. DB, ii, 14f; iv, 165f; Cremer, 844ff.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, genitive σαρκός, ἡ, Aeolic dialect σύρξ [Refs]:— flesh, [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in plural, except [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes to represent the whole body, μήτε γῆ δέξαιτό μου σάρκας θανόντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also collectively, of the body, γέροντα τὸν νοῦν, σάρκα δ᾽ ἡβῶσαν φέρει [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σαρκὸς περιβόλαια, ἐνδυτά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] uses singular and plural in much the same manner, ταῖς σαρξὶ σάρκες προσγένωνται [Refs], etc: portions of meat, usually in plural, σάρκας τρεῖς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; but, pieces of flesh or membrane, βήσσοντα. ὥστε σάρκας ἐνπύους. ἀποβάλλειν [Refs] b) εἰς σάρκα πημαίνειν to the quick, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 2) ἡ σ. τοῦ σκύτεος the inner or flesh-side of leather, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) fleshy, pulpy substance of fruit, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) the flesh, as the seat of the affections and lusts, fleshly nature, ἐν τῇ σ. ἡ ἡδονή [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδούλωτον (probable reading) τῇ σαρκὶ καὶ τοῖς ταύτης πάθεσι [Refs 1st c.AD+], compare 101b; frequently in NT, [NT] II.2) in “NT” also, the body, τῆς σαρκὸς πρόνοια [NT], = every-body, [LXX+NT]; οὐ. πᾶσα σάρξ nobody, [NT] II.3) the physical or natural order of things, opposed to the spiritual or supernatural, σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα [NT]; τὸν κύριον τῶν πνευμάτων καὶ πάσης σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] twr[kcirc]- 'portion', cf. Avest. θwar[schwa]s- 'cut'.)
Strongs
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sárx
Pronounciation:
sarx
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
flesh (as stripped of the skin), i.e. (strictly) the meat of an animal (as food), or (by extension) the body (as opposed to the soul (or spirit), or as the symbol of what is external, or as the means of kindred), or (by implication) human nature (with its frailties (physically or morally) and passions), or (specially), a human being (as such); carnal(-ly, + -ly minded), flesh(-ly); probably from the base of g4563 (σαρόω);

of beasts,
Strongs:
Word:
κτηνῶν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Plural Neuter
Grammar:
neuter PEOPLE OR THINGS that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
animal
Tyndale
Word:
κτῆνος
Transliteration:
ktēnos
Gloss:
animal
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
κτῆνος, -ους, τό (< κτάομαι, hence primarily a possession), [in LXX chiefly for בְּהֵמָה Gen.1:25, al, also for מִקְנֶה, צֹנֵא, etc;] a beast, (in late Gk. esp.) a beast of burden: Luk.10:34 pl. (as chiefly in cl.), Act.23:24, Rev.18:13; of quadrupeds, as Opp. to fishes and birds (cf. Ge, l.with), 1Co.15:39. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
κτῆνος
Transliteration:
ktēnos
Gloss:
animal
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Neuter
Definition:
κτῆνος, εος, τό, (κτάομαι) mostly in plural κτήνεα, contraction κτήνη, flocks and herds, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. τὰ δημιοπληθῆ [Refs 4th c.BC+]; of beasts in general, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; opposed to ἄνθρωποι, [Refs 3rd c.AD+]; of swine, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] 2) in singular, a single beast, as an ox or sheep, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; horse or mule for riding, [NT]; of a domestic animal, opposed to θηρίον, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
κτῆνος
Transliteration:
ktēnos
Pronounciation:
ktay'-nos
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Neuter
Definition:
property, i.e. (specially) a domestic animal; beast; from g2932 (κτάομαι);

another
Strongs:
Word:
ἄλλη
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, -η, -ο, (cf. Lat. alius, Eng. else), [in LXX for אַחֵר,אֶחָד, etc;] other, another: absol, Mat.20:3, al; ἄ. δέ, 1Co.3:10 12:8; pl, Mrk.6:15; attached to a noun, Mat.2:12 4:21, al; with art, ὁ ἄ, the other, Mat.5:39, Jhn.19:32 (Bl, §47, 8); οἱ ἄ, the others, the rest, Jhn.20:25, 1Co.14:29; ἄ. πρὸς ἄλλον = πρὸς ἀλλήλους (BL, §48, 10), Act.2:12; ἄλλ᾽ (i.e. ἄλλο) ἤ (Bl, §77, 13), Luk.12:51; before πλήν, Mrk.12:32; εἰ μή, Jhn.6:22; παρά with accusative, 1Co.3:11. SYN.: ἕτερος, which see ἄ. denotes numerical, ἕ. qualitative difference (Cremer, 89). ἄ. generally "denotes simply distinction of individuals, ἕ. involves the secondary idea of difference in kind" (see Lft, Meyer, Ramsay, on Gal.1:6, 7; Tr, Syn., §xcv; BL, §51, 6; M, Pr., 79f, 246; MM, VGT, s.vv.). As to whether the distinction can be maintained in 1Co.12:8, 10 see ICC, in l, and on Heb.11:35 f, see Westc, in l. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, η, ο, [Refs 5th c.AD+] yος, cf. Latin alius):—another, i. e. one besides what has been mentioned, either adjective or pronoun: when adjective, its substantive is either in the same case, or in genitive, Ζεῦ ἄλλοι τε θεοί[Refs 8th c.BC+] —ἄ. μέν. ἄ. δέ. one. another, more rarely the one. the other. (of two persons, etc.), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ μέν. ἄλλα δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+], and Attic dialect; ἕτερον μέν. ἄλλον δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄλλο μέν. ἑτέρου δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) with τις, any other, οὐδέ τις ἄ. ἔγνω ἀλλ᾽ ἄρα Κασσάνδρη[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐδεὶς ἄ. no other, [Refs]; ἄλλα πολλά[Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) frequently with another of its own cases or derived Adverbs, ἄ. ἄλλα λέγει one man says one thing, one another, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see at {ἄλλοθεν, ἄλλοσε, ἄλλοτε}; also with Verb in plural, παραλαμβάνων ἄ. ἄλλον ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου, τὸν δ᾽ ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου χρείᾳ. ἐθέμεθα πόλιν ὄνομα[Refs 5th c.BC+] when the several parties are plural, λείπουσι τὸν λόφον. ἄλλοι ἄλλοθεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) ἄ. καὶ ἄ, one and then another, one or two, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλο καὶ ἄλλο one thing after another, [Refs]; πρὸς ἄλλὡ καὶ ἄλλὡ σημείὡ to different points, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.4) repeated for emphasis, ἄ. ἄ. τρόπος quite another sort, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.5) οὐδ᾽ ἄ. for οὐδέτερος, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.6) with Article, ὁ ἄλλος, the rest, all besides; in plural, οἱ ἄλλοι (Ionic dialect contraction ὧλλοι) all the others, the rest, frequently from [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ ἄλλα, contraction τἆλλα, all else, τἆλλα πλὴν ὁ χρυσός[Refs]; in Attic dialect frequently as adverb, for the rest, especially in amendments to decrees, τὰ μὲν ἄλλα καθάπερ ὁ δεῖνα κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ ἄ. χρόνος, ={ὁ λοιπὸς χρόνος}, of the future, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but also of the past, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῇ ἄλλῃ ἡμέρᾳ, τῷ ἄλλῳ ἔτει, next day, next year, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἵτε ἄλλοι καί. all others and especially, γυναῖκας ἄλλας τε πολλὰς καὶ δὴκαὶ βασιλέος θυγατέρα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλα τε δὴ εἶπε, καί. [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τὸ ἄλλο is much less frequently than τὰ ἄλλα. II.7) with Numerals, yet, still, further, τρίτον ἄ. γένος[Refs 8th c.BC+]; πέμπτος ποταμὸς ἄ. yet a fifth river, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) in enumerations, as well, besides, ἅμα τῇγε καὶ ἀμφίπολοι κίον ἄλλαι with her their mistress came attendants also, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν χόρτος οὐδὲ ἄ. δένδρον οὐδέν there was no grass nor any tree at all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσοφλὼν οὐ τὴν ἐπωβελίαν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ ἄλλην ὕβριν besides, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with comparative, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with superlative, ὀϊζυρώτατος ἄλλων[Refs 8th c.BC+] III) less frequently, ={ἀλλοῖος}, of other sort, different, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.2) in this sense, with genitive, ἄλλα τῶν δικαίων other than just, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —followed by ἤ, with preceding _negative_, οὐδὲ ἄλλο, οὐδὲν ἄλλο (or ἄλλο οὐδέν), ἤ. nothing else than, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μηδὲν ἄλλο ἢ διανεῖταί τις which one only thinks, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἄλλογ᾽ ἢπόνοι; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ἄλλο (i.e. ἐποίησαν) ἢ ἐπεβούλευσα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by Preps, πρό.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀντί. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; παρά. [Refs 8th c.BC+] —see also ἄλλο τι. III.3) other than what is, untrue, unreal, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.4) other than right, wrong, bad, ἄλλου τινος ἡττῆσθαι yield to some unworthy motive, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; compare ἄλλως.
Strongs
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
állos
Pronounciation:
al'-los
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
"else," i.e. different (in many applications); more, one (another), (an-, some an-)other(-s, -wise); a primary word;

however
Strongs:
Word:
δὲ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
and
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most freq. without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative);

flesh
Strongs:
Word:
σὰρξ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that is doing something
Translators:
Translated in most modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland), but not in the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, σαρκός, ἡ [in LXX chiefly for בָּשָׂר;] flesh; 1) as in cl. generally, (a) prop, of the soft substance of the animal body: 1Co.15:39, 2Co.12:7, Gal.6:13, al; σ. καὶ αἷμα, 1Co.5:50; σ. καὶ ὀστέα, Luk.24:39; pl, of the flesh of many or parts of the flesh of one (cl.), Rev.17:16 19:18; φαγεῖν, Re, ll. with (cf. κατεσθίειν, 4Ki.9:36, al, and βιβρώσκειν, freq. in l.); metaph, Jas.5:3; mystically, φ. (τρώγειν) τὴν σ. τοῦ υἱοῦ τ. ἀνθρώπου, Jhn.6:52-56; (b) Of the whole substance of the body, = σῶμα: Act.2:26 (LXX), 31, 2Co.12:7, Gal.4:14, Eph.5:29; μία σ, Mrk.10:8; εἰς σ. μίαν (Gen.2:24), Mat.19:5, Mrk.10:8, 1Co.6:16, Eph.5:31; hence, of the material as opp. to the immaterial part of man (cf. Lft, Notes, 88): opp. to πνεῦμα, 1Co.5:5, 2Co.7:1, Col.2:5, 1Pe.3:18, 4:6; to ψύχη, Act.2:31, Rec; of the present life, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Rom.7:5, Gal.2:20, Php.1:22, 24 1Pe.4:2; of Christ's life on earth, αἱ ἡμέραι τ. σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ, Heb.5:7; of things pertaining to the body, ἐν (τῇ) σ, Gal.6:12, 13 Php.3:3, 4. 2) As in Heb. idiom, (a) of a living creature: πᾶσα σ. (Heb. כָּל־בָּשָׂר; cf. Bl, §47, 9), Mat.24:22, Mrk.13:20, 1Pe.1:24; esp. of man and his mortality (Psa.55 (56):5, Sir.28:5, al.), Jhn.1:14; πᾶσα σ. (see supr.), Luk.3:6, Jhn.17:2, Act.2:17, ἐν σ, 1Jo.4:2, 1Ti.3:16; (b) of natural origin and relationship (Gen.2:24, Isa.58:7, al.): τέκνα τῆς σ, Rom.9:8; κατὰ σάρκα, ib. 3, 5, 1Co.10:18, Gal.4:23, 29; ἡ σ. μου, Rom.11:14 (cf. Jdg.9:2, 2Ki.5:1, al.). 3) Of the physical nature as subject to sensation and desire (Plut.), (a) without any ethical disparagement: Rom.7:18 13:14; opp. to πνεῦμα, Mat.26:41, Mrk.14:38; τ. θέλημα τῆς σ, Jhn.1:13; ἡ ἐπιθυμία τῆς σ, 1Jn.2:16; pl, 2Pe.2:18; παθεῖν σαρκί, 1Pe.4:1; (b) in ethical sense, esp. in Pauline Epp, of the flesh as the seat and vehicle of sinful desires: opp. to νοῦς, Rom.7:25; to πνεῦμα, Rom.8:4-9, 12, 13, Gal.5:16, 17 19 6:8 (cf. DB, ii, 14f; iv, 165f; Cremer, 844ff.). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sarx
Gloss:
flesh
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
σάρξ, genitive σαρκός, ἡ, Aeolic dialect σύρξ [Refs]:— flesh, [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in plural, except [Refs 8th c.BC+]; sometimes to represent the whole body, μήτε γῆ δέξαιτό μου σάρκας θανόντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also collectively, of the body, γέροντα τὸν νοῦν, σάρκα δ᾽ ἡβῶσαν φέρει [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σαρκὸς περιβόλαια, ἐνδυτά, [Refs 5th c.BC+] uses singular and plural in much the same manner, ταῖς σαρξὶ σάρκες προσγένωνται [Refs], etc: portions of meat, usually in plural, σάρκας τρεῖς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; but, pieces of flesh or membrane, βήσσοντα. ὥστε σάρκας ἐνπύους. ἀποβάλλειν [Refs] b) εἰς σάρκα πημαίνειν to the quick, [Refs 1st c.BC+] 2) ἡ σ. τοῦ σκύτεος the inner or flesh-side of leather, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) fleshy, pulpy substance of fruit, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) the flesh, as the seat of the affections and lusts, fleshly nature, ἐν τῇ σ. ἡ ἡδονή [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀδούλωτον (probable reading) τῇ σαρκὶ καὶ τοῖς ταύτης πάθεσι [Refs 1st c.AD+], compare 101b; frequently in NT, [NT] II.2) in “NT” also, the body, τῆς σαρκὸς πρόνοια [NT], = every-body, [LXX+NT]; οὐ. πᾶσα σάρξ nobody, [NT] II.3) the physical or natural order of things, opposed to the spiritual or supernatural, σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα [NT]; τὸν κύριον τῶν πνευμάτων καὶ πάσης σ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] twr[kcirc]- 'portion', cf. Avest. θwar[schwa]s- 'cut'.)
Strongs
Word:
σάρξ
Transliteration:
sárx
Pronounciation:
sarx
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
flesh (as stripped of the skin), i.e. (strictly) the meat of an animal (as food), or (by extension) the body (as opposed to the soul (or spirit), or as the symbol of what is external, or as the means of kindred), or (by implication) human nature (with its frailties (physically or morally) and passions), or (specially), a human being (as such); carnal(-ly, + -ly minded), flesh(-ly); probably from the base of g4563 (σαρόω);

of birds,
Strongs:
Word:
πτηνῶν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Genitive Plural Neuter
Grammar:
DESCRIBING neuter people or things that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
birds
Tyndale
Word:
πτηνός
Transliteration:
ptēnos
Gloss:
bird
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
πτηνός, -ή, -όν (< πέτομαι), [in Aq: Job.5:7 *;] winged; as subst, π, birds: 1Co.15:39. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πτηνός
Transliteration:
ptēnos
Gloss:
bird
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
πτηνός, ή, όν, Doric dialect πτανός, ά, όν; also ός, όν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: (πτῆναι, πέτομαι):— flying, winged, Διὸς π. κύων, i.e. eagle, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὄρνις, οἰωνός, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἔρως, ἵπποι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also of arrows, π. ἰοί [Refs 5th c.BC+]; π. φυγή, of birds, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) τὰ π. winged creatures, birds, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; opposed to τὰ πεζά, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; opposed to τὰ πεζά and τὰ πλωτά, [Refs 4th c.BC+] the pursuit of winged game, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ [θήρα] τῶν π. [Refs 5th c.BC+]: of young birds, fledged, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 3) swift-footed, παρδάλεις, κάμηλοι, [Refs 4th c.AD+] II) metaphorically, πτηνοὶ μῦθοι, Homer's ἔπεα πτερόεντα, [Refs 5th c.BC+] fleeting, idle words, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πτηνὰς διώκεις ἐλπίδας fleeting hopes, [Refs] II.2) πτανὰ ἰσχύς soaring, aspiring strength, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
πτηνόν
Transliteration:
ptēnón
Pronounciation:
ptay-non'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
a bird; bird; contraction for g4071 (πετεινόν);

another
Strongs:
Word:
ἄλλη
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Nominative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a female person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, -η, -ο, (cf. Lat. alius, Eng. else), [in LXX for אַחֵר,אֶחָד, etc;] other, another: absol, Mat.20:3, al; ἄ. δέ, 1Co.3:10 12:8; pl, Mrk.6:15; attached to a noun, Mat.2:12 4:21, al; with art, ὁ ἄ, the other, Mat.5:39, Jhn.19:32 (Bl, §47, 8); οἱ ἄ, the others, the rest, Jhn.20:25, 1Co.14:29; ἄ. πρὸς ἄλλον = πρὸς ἀλλήλους (BL, §48, 10), Act.2:12; ἄλλ᾽ (i.e. ἄλλο) ἤ (Bl, §77, 13), Luk.12:51; before πλήν, Mrk.12:32; εἰ μή, Jhn.6:22; παρά with accusative, 1Co.3:11. SYN.: ἕτερος, which see ἄ. denotes numerical, ἕ. qualitative difference (Cremer, 89). ἄ. generally "denotes simply distinction of individuals, ἕ. involves the secondary idea of difference in kind" (see Lft, Meyer, Ramsay, on Gal.1:6, 7; Tr, Syn., §xcv; BL, §51, 6; M, Pr., 79f, 246; MM, VGT, s.vv.). As to whether the distinction can be maintained in 1Co.12:8, 10 see ICC, in l, and on Heb.11:35 f, see Westc, in l. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
allos
Gloss:
another
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἄλλος, η, ο, [Refs 5th c.AD+] yος, cf. Latin alius):—another, i. e. one besides what has been mentioned, either adjective or pronoun: when adjective, its substantive is either in the same case, or in genitive, Ζεῦ ἄλλοι τε θεοί[Refs 8th c.BC+] —ἄ. μέν. ἄ. δέ. one. another, more rarely the one. the other. (of two persons, etc.), [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ μέν. ἄλλα δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+], and Attic dialect; ἕτερον μέν. ἄλλον δέ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄλλο μέν. ἑτέρου δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) with τις, any other, οὐδέ τις ἄ. ἔγνω ἀλλ᾽ ἄρα Κασσάνδρη[Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐδεὶς ἄ. no other, [Refs]; ἄλλα πολλά[Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) frequently with another of its own cases or derived Adverbs, ἄ. ἄλλα λέγει one man says one thing, one another, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see at {ἄλλοθεν, ἄλλοσε, ἄλλοτε}; also with Verb in plural, παραλαμβάνων ἄ. ἄλλον ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου, τὸν δ᾽ ἐπ᾽ ἄλλου χρείᾳ. ἐθέμεθα πόλιν ὄνομα[Refs 5th c.BC+] when the several parties are plural, λείπουσι τὸν λόφον. ἄλλοι ἄλλοθεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) ἄ. καὶ ἄ, one and then another, one or two, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλο καὶ ἄλλο one thing after another, [Refs]; πρὸς ἄλλὡ καὶ ἄλλὡ σημείὡ to different points, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.4) repeated for emphasis, ἄ. ἄ. τρόπος quite another sort, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.5) οὐδ᾽ ἄ. for οὐδέτερος, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] II.6) with Article, ὁ ἄλλος, the rest, all besides; in plural, οἱ ἄλλοι (Ionic dialect contraction ὧλλοι) all the others, the rest, frequently from [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὰ ἄλλα, contraction τἆλλα, all else, τἆλλα πλὴν ὁ χρυσός[Refs]; in Attic dialect frequently as adverb, for the rest, especially in amendments to decrees, τὰ μὲν ἄλλα καθάπερ ὁ δεῖνα κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ ἄ. χρόνος, ={ὁ λοιπὸς χρόνος}, of the future, [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but also of the past, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῇ ἄλλῃ ἡμέρᾳ, τῷ ἄλλῳ ἔτει, next day, next year, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἵτε ἄλλοι καί. all others and especially, γυναῖκας ἄλλας τε πολλὰς καὶ δὴκαὶ βασιλέος θυγατέρα[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄλλα τε δὴ εἶπε, καί. [Refs 5th c.BC+] —τὸ ἄλλο is much less frequently than τὰ ἄλλα. II.7) with Numerals, yet, still, further, τρίτον ἄ. γένος[Refs 8th c.BC+]; πέμπτος ποταμὸς ἄ. yet a fifth river, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.8) in enumerations, as well, besides, ἅμα τῇγε καὶ ἀμφίπολοι κίον ἄλλαι with her their mistress came attendants also, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐ γὰρ ἦν χόρτος οὐδὲ ἄ. δένδρον οὐδέν there was no grass nor any tree at all, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; προσοφλὼν οὐ τὴν ἐπωβελίαν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ ἄλλην ὕβριν besides, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with comparative, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with superlative, ὀϊζυρώτατος ἄλλων[Refs 8th c.BC+] III) less frequently, ={ἀλλοῖος}, of other sort, different, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.2) in this sense, with genitive, ἄλλα τῶν δικαίων other than just, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —followed by ἤ, with preceding _negative_, οὐδὲ ἄλλο, οὐδὲν ἄλλο (or ἄλλο οὐδέν), ἤ. nothing else than, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἃ μηδὲν ἄλλο ἢ διανεῖταί τις which one only thinks, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί δ᾽ ἄλλογ᾽ ἢπόνοι; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί ἄλλο (i.e. ἐποίησαν) ἢ ἐπεβούλευσα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; by Preps, πρό.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀντί. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; παρά. [Refs 8th c.BC+] —see also ἄλλο τι. III.3) other than what is, untrue, unreal, [Refs 8th c.BC+] III.4) other than right, wrong, bad, ἄλλου τινος ἡττῆσθαι yield to some unworthy motive, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; compare ἄλλως.
Strongs
Word:
ἄλλος
Transliteration:
állos
Pronounciation:
al'-los
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
"else," i.e. different (in many applications); more, one (another), (an-, some an-)other(-s, -wise); a primary word;

however
Strongs:
Word:
δὲ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
and
Tyndale
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ (before vowels δ᾽; on the general neglect of the elision in NT, see WH, App., 146; Tdf, Pr., 96), post-positive conjunctive particle; 1) copulative, but, in the next place, and, now (Abbott, JG, 104): Mat.1:2 ff, 2Co.6:15, 16, 2Pe.1:5-7; in repetition for emphasis, Rom.3:21, 22, 9:30, 1Co.2:6, Gal.2:2, Php.2:8; in transition to something new, Mat.1:18, 2:19, Luk.13:1, Jhn.7:14, Act.6:1, Rom.8:28, 1Co.7:1 8:1, al; in explanatory parenthesis or addition, Jhn.3:19, Rom.5:8, 1Co.1:12, Eph.2:4, 5:32, al; ὡς δέ, Jhn.2:9; καὶ. δέ, but also, Mat.10:18, Luk.1:76, Jhn.6:51, Rom.11:23, al; καὶ ἐὰν δέ, yea even if, Jhn.8:16. 2) Adversative, but, on the other hand, prop, answering to a foregoing μέν (which see), and distinguishing a word or clause from one preceding (in NT most freq. without μέν; Bl, §77, 12): ἐὰν δέ, Mat.6:14, 23, al; ἐγὼ (σὺ, etc.) δέ, Mat.5:22, 6:6, Mrk.8:29, al; ὁ δέ, αὐτὸς δέ, Mrk.1:45, Luk.4:40, al; after a negation, Mat.6:19, 20, Rom.3:4, 1Th.5:21, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
de
Gloss:
then
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
δέ, but: adversative and copulative Particle, I) answering to μέν (which see), τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) without preceding μέν, II.1) adversative, expressing distinct opposition, αἰεί τοι τὰ κάκ᾽ ἐστὶ φίλα. μαντεύεσθαι, ἐσθλὸν δ᾽ οὔτε τί πω εἶπας[Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose, οὐκ ἐπὶ κακῷ, ἐλευθερώσει δέ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) copulative, II.2.a) in explanatory clauses, ξυνέβησαν. τὰ μακρὰ τείχη ἑλεῖν (ἦν δὲ σταδίων μάλιστα ὀκτώ) [Refs 8th c.BC+]: when a substantive is followed by words in apposition, Ἀρισταγόρῃ τῷ Μιλησίῳ, δούλῳ δὲ ἡμετέρῳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in answers, διπλᾶ λέγειν. —Answ. διπλᾶδ᾽ ὁρᾶν [Refs] II.2.b) in enumerations or transitions, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with repetition of a word in different relations, ὣς Ἀχιλεὺς θάμβησεν, θάμβησαν δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in rhetorical outbursts, οὐκ ἂν εὐθέως εἴποιεν· τὸν δὲ βάσκανον, τὸν δὲ ὄλεθρον, τοῦτον δὲ ὑβρίζειν,—ἀναπνεῖν δέ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in a climax, πᾶν γύναιον καὶ παιδίον καὶ θηρίον δέ nay even beast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in the combination καὶ δέ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2.c) answering to τε (which see), ἃ τῶν τε ἀποβαινόντων ἕνεκα ἄξια κεκτῆσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον αὐτὰ αὑτῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) implying causal connexion, less direct than γάρ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) in questions, with implied opposition, ἑόρακας δ᾽, ἔφη, τὴν γυναῖκ; [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4.b) τί δ; what then? to mark a transition in dialogue; see at {τίς}. II) in apodosi: II.1) after hypothetical clauses, εἰ δέ κε μὴ δώωσιν, ἐγὼ δέ κεν αὐτὸς ἕλωμαι if they will not give it, then I, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.1.b) after temporal or relative clauses, with ἐπεί, ἕως, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; with demonstrative Pronouns or adverbs answering to a preceding relative, οἵηπερ φύλλων γενεή, τοίη δὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: sometimes after a participle, οἰόμενοι. τιμῆς τεύξεσθαι, ἀντὶ δὲ τούτων οὐδ᾽ ὅμοιοι. ἐσόμεθα [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) to resume after an interruption or parenthesis, χρόνου δὲ ἐπιγινομένου καὶ κατεστραμμένων σχεδὸν πάντων,—κατεστραμμένων δὲ τούτων. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with an anacoluthon, ἡ δὲ ψυχὴ ἄρα,—οἷ ἂν θεὸς θέλῃ. τῇ ἐμῇ ψυχῇ ἰτέον, αὕτη δὲ δή. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) to begin a story, ἦμος δ᾽ ἠέλιος. well, when the sun, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.4) to introduce a proof, τεκμήριον δέ, σημεῖον δέ, (see entry). B) POSITION of δέ. It usually stands second: hence frequently between Article and substantive or preposition and case; but also after substantive, or words forming a connected notion, hence it may stand third, γυναῖκα πιστὴν δ᾽ ἐν δόμοις εὕροι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Prose after a negative, οὐχ ὑπ᾽ ἐραστοῦ δέ, to avoid confusion between οὐ δέ and οὐδέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
δέ
Transliteration:
Pronounciation:
deh
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
but, and, etc.; also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English); a primary particle (adversative or continuative);

of fish.
Strongs:
Word:
ἰχθύων
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Plural Masculine
Grammar:
male PEOPLE OR THINGS that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
fish
Tyndale
Word:
ἰχθύς
Transliteration:
ichthus
Gloss:
fish
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
ἰχθύς, -ύoς, ὁ [in LXX for דָּג, דָּגָה;] a fish: Mat.7:10, Mrk.6:38, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἰχθύς
Transliteration:
ichthus
Gloss:
fish
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
ἰχθῦς (so Hdn.Gr.2.936, -ῦς and -ύς frequently in codices), ύος, ὁ, accusative ἰχθύν [Refs 5th c.BC+], in late Poets also ἰχθύα [Refs 5th c.BC+], contraction ἰχθῦς [Refs 8th c.BC+], both forms being used in Comedy texts, -ῦς[Refs 5th c.BC+], -ύας [Refs 4th c.BC+] -ῦς [Refs 1st c.BC+]; -ύας[Refs 4th c.BC+]:—fish, ὠμηστής [Refs 8th c.BC+]: metaphorically, of a stupid fellow, [Refs 1st c.AD+] II) in plural, οἱ ἰχθύες the fish-market at Athens, παρὰ τοὺς ἰχθῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) plural, the constellation [Refs 4th c.BC+] Attic dialect accusative to [Refs 2nd c.AD+] [ῡ in disyllable cases, nominative -ῡς[Refs 8th c.BC+]), accusative -ῡν [Refs 5th c.BC+], but -ῠν [Refs 5th c.BC+] [same place]: ῠ in trisyllable cases and in all compounds] (Cf. Lithuanian žuvìs, Armenian jukn, 'fish'.)
Strongs
Word:
ἰχθύς
Transliteration:
ichthýs
Pronounciation:
ikh-thoos'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a fish; fish; of uncertain affinity;