ܥܒܪ̈ܝܐ 11:27

ܒܗܝܡܢܘܬܐ ܫܒܩܗ ܠܡܨܪܝܢ ܘܠܐ ܕܚܠ ܡܢ ܚܡܬܗ ܕܡܠܟܐ ܘܤܝܒܪ ܐܝܟ ܗܘ ܕܚܙܐ ܗܘܐ ܠܐܠܗܐ ܕܠܐ ܡܬܚܙܐ 27
By faith
Strongs:
Word:
πίστει
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Dative Singular Feminine
Grammar:
a female PERSON OR THING that something is done for‚ or in relation to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
faith
Tyndale
Word:
πίστις
Transliteration:
pistis
Gloss:
: faith
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
πίστις, -εως, ἡ (< πείθω), [in LXX chiefly for אֱמוּנָה;] 1) in active sense, faith, belief, trust, confidence, in NT always of religious faith in God or Christ or spiritual things: Mat.8:10, Luk.5:20, Act.14:9, Rom.1:8, 1Co.2:5, 2Co.1:24, 1Ti.1:5, al; with genitive obj, Mrk.11:22, Act.3:16, Rom.3:22, Gal.2:16, Eph.3:12, Jas.2:1, al; with prep, ἐν, Rom.3:25, Gal.3:26, Eph.1:15, Col.1:24, 1Ti.1:14 3:13, 2Ti.1:13 3:15, 2Pe.1:1; εἰς, Act.20:21 24:24 26:18, Col.2:5, 1Pe.1:21; πρός, 1Th.1:8, Phm 5; ἐπί, with accusative Heb.6:1; ἐν τῇ π. στήκειν (εἶναι, μένειν), 1Co.16:13, 1Co.13:5, 1Ti.2:15; ὑπακοὴ τῆς π, Rom.1:5 16:26; ὁ ἐκ π, Rom.3:26 4:16, Gal.3:12; διὰ (τῆς) π, Rom.3:30, Gal.2:16, Php.3:9. By meton, objectively, that which is the object or content of belief, the faith: Act.6:7 14:22, Gal.1:23 3:23 6:10, Php.1:26, 27 Ju 3, 20, and perh. also Act.13:8 16:5, Rom.1:5 and 16:26 (see supr.), 1Co.16:13, Col.1:23, 2Th.3:2 (Lft, Notes, 125), 1Ti.1:19 3:9 4:1, 6 5:8 6:10, 12, 2Ti.3:8 4:7 Tit.1:4, 13 3:15, 1Pe.5:9. 2) In passive sense, (a) fidelity, faithfulness: Mat.23:23, Gal.5:22; ἡ π. τοῦ θεοῦ, Rom.3:3; (b) objectively, plighted faith, a pledge of fidelity: 1Ti.5:12. (On the various shades of meaning in which the word is used in NT, see esp. ICC on Rom.1:17, pp. 31ff; Lft, Ga., 154ff; Stevens, Th. NT, 422, 515ff; DB, i, 830ff; Cremer, see word) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
πίστις
Transliteration:
pistis
Gloss:
: faith
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Female
Definition:
πίστις, ἡ, genitive εως, Ionic dialect ιος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; dative πίστει, Ionic dialect πίστῑ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: (πείθομαι):—trust in others, faith, first in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: generally, persuasion of a thing, confidence, assurance, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ βεβαιοτάτη π, ἀταραξία καὶ π. βέβαιος, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; σωφροσύνης π. ἔχειν περί τινος to be persuaded of his probity, [Refs 4th c.BC+] 2) in subjective sense, good faith, trustworthiness, honesty, [Refs 6th c.BC+] 2.b) of things, credence, credit, τὰν π. σμικρὰν παρ᾽ ἔμοιγ᾽ ἔχει [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2.c) καλῇ π, = Latin bona fide, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; αἱ κατὰ πίστιν γεινόμεναι κληρονομίαι, = Latin hereditates fideicommissariae, [Refs] 3) in a commercial sense, credit, π. τοσούτων χρημάτων ἐστί τινι παρά τισι he has credit for so much money with them, [Refs 4th c.BC+], compare 44; εἰς πίστιν διδόναι [τί τινι] [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 3.b) position of trust or trusteeship, ἐν πίστει κληρονόμος ἀπολειφθείς left in trust, as guardian, [Refs 1st c.AD+] 4) Theol, faith, opposed to sight and knowledge, [NT] II) that which gives confidence: hence, II.1) assurance, pledge of good faith, guarantee, οὐκ ἀνδρὸς ὅρκοι π. ἀλλ᾽ ὅρκων ἀνήρ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δός μοι χερὸς σῆς π. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πίστιν καὶ ὅρκια ποιέεσθαι make a treaty by exchange of assurances and oaths, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ποιέεσθαι τὰς πίστῑς (Ionic dialect for πίστεις) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πίστιν δοῦναι to give assurances, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔδοσαν πίστιν καὶ ἔλαβον interchanged them, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; π. πρός τινας δοῦναι with infinitive, [Refs]; πίστι τε λαβεῖν (or καταλαβεῖν) καὶ ὁρκίοισί τινα bind by assurances and oaths, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πίστιν ἐπιθεῖναι or προσθεῖναι, [Refs 4th c.BC+]. an assurance against, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) means of persuasion, argument, proof, φρὴν παρ᾽ ἡμέων (i.e. τῶν αἰσθήσεων) λαβοῦσα τὰς πίστεις [Refs 3rd c.AD+]; especially of proofs used by orators, [Refs 5th c.BC+], opposed to a demonstrative proof (ἀπόδειξις), π. ἔντεχνοι, ἄτεχνοι, [Refs]; ἡ τῶν λόγων π. (compare λόγος[Refs] III) that which is entrusted, a trust, πίστιν ἐγχειρίζειν τινί [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; σὴ π. given in trust to thee, [Refs 1st c.AD+] IV) political protection or suzerainty, Latin fides, Αἰτωλοὶ. δόντες αὑτοὺς εἰς τὴν Ῥωμαίων π. τῷ τῆς π. ὀνόματι πλανηθέντες [Refs 2nd c.BC+] IV.2) in Egypt, safe-conduct, safeguard, [Refs 2nd c.BC+] V) [Refs 4th c.BC+] name for ten, [Refs] VI) personified, = Latin [Refs 1st c.AD+]; π. δημοσία, = Fides publica, [Refs 1st c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
πίστις
Transliteration:
pístis
Pronounciation:
pis'-tis
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Feminine
Definition:
persuasion, i.e. credence; moral conviction (of religious truth, or the truthfulness of God or a religious teacher), especially reliance upon Christ for salvation; abstractly, constancy in such profession; by extension, the system of religious (Gospel) truth itself; assurance, belief, believe, faith, fidelity; from g3982 (πείθω);

he left
Strongs:
Word:
κατέλιπεν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb 2nd Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to leave
Tyndale
Word:
καταλείπω
Transliteration:
kataleipō
Gloss:
to leave behind
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
κατα-λείπω [in LXX chiefly far שָׁאַר, ni, hi, also for עָזַב, יָתַר, etc;] 1 1, to leave behind, leave: with accusative of person(s) (of thing(s)), Mat.4:13, Mrk.12:19, 21, Luk.20:31, Act.24:27 25:14, Heb.11:27; of sailing by a place, Act.21:3; ptcp, καταλιπών, redundant (Dalman, Words, 21 f.), Mat.16:4 21:17; pass, Jhn.8:9, 1Th.3:1; metaph, εὐθεῖαν ὁδόν, 2Pe.2:15. 2) to forsake, abandon: Mat.19:5, Mrk.10:7 " (LXX) Mrk.14:52, Luk.5:28 15:4, Act.6:2, Eph.5:31 " (LXX). 3) to leave remaining, reserve: with accusative and inf, Luk.10:40; ἐμαυτῷ, Rom.11:4 (LXX); pass, Heb.4:1 (cf. ἐν-κατα-λείπω). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
καταλείπω
Transliteration:
kataleipō
Gloss:
to leave behind
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
καταλείπω, later καταλιμπάνω (which see), Epic dialect also καλλείπω [Refs 8th c.BC+]: future καλλείψω [Refs]: aorist κάλλῐπον [Refs]: aorist 1 subjunctive καλλείψῃς [Refs 4th c.AD+]; participle καλλείψας [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; Ionic dialect iterative καταλίπεσκε (κατελίπεσκε, καταλειπέεσκε codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: perfect -λέλοιπα[Refs 5th c.BC+] —middle, future καταλείψομαι (in passive sense) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist 2 -ελιπόμην[Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, future καταλειφθήσομαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—leave behind, πὰρ δ᾽ ἄρ᾽ ὄχεσφιν ἄλλον. κάλλιπεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; especially of persons dying or going into a far country, κὰδ δέ με Χήρην λείπεις ἐν μεγάροισι [Refs 8th c.BC+] —middle, καταλείπεσθαι παῖδας leave behind one, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:— passive, to be left, remain behind, κατελέλειπτο ἐν Πέρσῃσι [Refs 5th c.BC+] a force left behind the rest, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2) bequeath, [τόξον] παιδὶ κάλλιπ᾽ ἀποθνῄσκων [Refs 8th c.BC+]; παισὶν αἰδῶ οὐ Χρυσὸν κ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, εἰ καταλείψει μηδὲ ταφῆναι not enough to be buried with, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —passive, [Χρήματα] καταλειφθέντα [Refs 4th c.BC+] 2.b) κ. διαθήκας leave a will (when going on service), [Refs] 3) middle, leave in a certain state, κόλπον βαθὺν καταλιπόμενος τοῦ κιθῶνος [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) forsake, abandon, οὕτω δὴ μέμονας Τρώων πόλιν. καλλείψει; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πολλοὺς καταλείψομεν we shall leave many upon the field,[Refs]: with infinitive, κάλλιπεν οἰωνοῖσιν ἕλωρ καὶ κύρμα γενέσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; σχεδίην ἀνέμοισι φέρεσθαι κ[Refs 5th c.BC+]; πατέρας καὶ ξυγγενεῖς ἀτίμους κ. [Refs]; κ. τὴν δίαιταν not to appear at the trial, Test. cited in [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.2) let drop, give up, τὰ αὑτῶν ἔργα [Refs 5th c.BC+] III) leave remaining, ὀκτὼ μόνον [Refs 5th c.BC+] codices; κ. ἄφοδον leave an exit, [Refs]:—middle, κ. στενὴν διέξοδον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; -λείπεσθαι ἑαυτῷ reserve for oneself, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—passive, to be left, remain, τίς ἔτι ἡδονὴ -λείπετα; [NT+5th c.BC+]; of the remainder in calculations, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] with infinitive, it remains that. , τὸν κόσμον κ. ἀθάνατον εἶμεν Aristaeusap.[Refs 1st c.AD+]; -λείπεται μάχη yet remains to be fought, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.2) leave alone, opposed to περιαιρέω, [Refs 4th c.BC+] III.2.b) leave undisputed, τὰς παραλλαγάς [Refs 1st c.BC+]: hence, admit, allow the truth of a doctrine, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]:—passive, [Refs 1st c.BC+] III.2.c) omit, with infinitive, [Refs 3rd c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
καταλείπω
Transliteration:
kataleípō
Pronounciation:
kat-al-i'-po
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to leave down, i.e. behind; by implication, to abandon, have remaining; forsake, leave, reserve; from g2596 (κατά) and g3007 (λείπω);

Egypt,
Strongs:
Word:
αἴγυπτον
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Feminine Location
Grammar:
a female LOCATION that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
Egypt @ Gen 12:10
Tyndale
Word:
Αἴγυπτος
Transliteration:
Aiguptos
Gloss:
Egypt
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Female, Location
Definition:
Αἴγυπτος, ου, ἡ, Egypt: Mat.2:13-15,19, Act.2:10 7:9-39, Heb.3:16 11:26,27; γῆ Αἴ, Act.7:40 13:17, Heb.8:9, Ju 5 (cf. Exo.5:12, al.); ἡ Αἴ, Act.7:11; figuratively, of Jerusalem as hostile to God, Rev.11:8. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Αἴγυπτος
Transliteration:
Aiguptos
Gloss:
Egypt
Morphhology:
Proper Name, Noun, Female, Location
Definition:
Αἴγυπτος, ὁ, the river Nile, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 2) King Aegyptus, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II) ἡ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Αἴγυπτόνδε to Egypt, [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
Αἴγυπτος
Transliteration:
Aígyptos
Pronounciation:
ah'-ee-goop-tos
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Location
Definition:
Ægyptus, the land of the Nile; Egypt; of uncertain derivation;

not
Strongs:
Word:
μὴ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Negative Particle Negative Negative
Grammar:
introducing a negative
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
μή
Transliteration:
Gloss:
not
Morphhology:
Greek, Negative
Definition:
μή, subjective negative particle, used where the negation depends on a condition or hypothesis, expressed or understood, as distinct from οὐ, which denies absolutely. μή is used where one thinks a thing is not, as distinct from an absolute negation. As a general rule, οὐ negatives the indic, μή the other moods, incl, ptcp. [In LXX for אֵין,אַיִן,אַל] I. As a neg. adv, not; 1) with ref. to thought or opinion: Jhn.3:18, Tit.1:11, 2Pe.1:9. 2) In delib. questions, with subjc. (M, Pr., 185): Mrk.12:14, Rom.3:8. 3) In conditional and final sentences, after εἰ, ἐάν, ἄν, ἵνα, ὅπως: Mat.10:14, Mrk.6:11 12:19, Luk.9:5, Jhn.6:50, Rom.11:25, al. 4) C. inf. (see M, Pr., 234f, 239, 255), (a) after verbs of saying, etc: Mat.2:12 5:34, Mrk.12:18, Act.15:38, Rom.2:21, al; (b) with artic. inf: after a prep, Mat.13:5, Mrk.4:5, Act.7:19, 1Co.10:6, al; without a prep, Rom.14:13, 2Co.2:1, 13 1Th 4:6; (with) in sentences expressing consequence, after ὥστε: Mat.8:28, Mrk.3:20, 1Co.1:7, 2Co.3:7, al. 5) C. ptcp. (see M, Pr., 231f, 239), in hypothetical references to persons of a certain character or description: Mat.10:28 12:30, Luk.6:49, Jhn.3:18, Rom.4:5, 1Co.7:38, 1Jn.3:10, al; where the person or thing being definite, the denial is a matter of opinion: Jhn.6:64, 1Co.1:28 4:7, 18, 2Co.5:21, al; where the ptcp. has a concessive, causal or conditional force, if, though, because not: Mat.18:25, Luk.2:45, Jhn.7:49, Act.9:26, Rom.2:14 5:13, 2Co.3:14, Gal.6:9, Ju 5; where the ptcp. has a descriptive force (being such as), not: Act.9:9, Rom.1:28, 1Co.10:33, Gal.4:8, Heb.12:27, al. 6) μή prohibitive, in indep. sentences, (a) with subjc. praes, 1 of person(s) pl: Gal.5:26 6:9, 1Th.5:6, 1Jn.3:18; (b) with imperat. praes, usually where one is bidden to desist from what has already begun (cf. M, Pr., 122ff.): Mat.7:1, Mrk.5:36, Luk.6:30, Jhn.2:16 5:45, Act.10:15, Rom.11:18, Jas.2:1, Rev.5:5, al; (with) forbidding that which is still future: with imperat. aor, 3 of person(s), Mat.24:18, Mrk.13:15, Luk.17:31, al; with subjc. aor, 2 of person(s), Mat.3:9 10:26, Mrk.5:7, Luk.6:29, Jhn.3:7, Rom.10:6, al; (d) with optative, in wishes: 2Ti.4:16 (LXX); μὴ γένοιτο (see M, Pr., 194; Bl, §66, 1), Luk.20:16, Rom.3:3, al; μή τις, Mrk.13:5, al. II. As a conj, 1) after verbs of fearing, caution, etc, that, lest, perhaps (M, Pr., 192f.): with subjc. praes, Heb.12:15; with subjc. aor, Mat.24:4, Mrk.13:5, Luk.21:8, Act.13:40, Gal.5:15, al; ὅρα μή (see M, Pr., 124, 178), elliptically, Rev.19:10 22:9; with indic, fut. (M, Pr., l.with), Col.2:8. 2) in order that not: with subjc. aor, Mrk.13:36, 2Co.8:20 12:6. III. Interrogative, in hesitant questions (M, Pr., 170), or where a negative answer is expected: Mat.7:9, 10, Mrk.2:19, Jhn.3:4, Rom.3:3 10:18, 19, 1Co.1:13, al; μή τις, Luk.22:35, al; before οὐ (Rom.10:17, al. in Pl.), expecting an affirm, ans; οὐ μή, Luk.18:7, Jhn.18:11. IV. οὐ μή as emphatic negation (cf. M, Pr., 188, 190ff; Bl. §64, 5), not at all, by no means: with indic, fut, Mat.16:22, Jhn.6:35, Heb.10:17, al; with subjc. aor, Mat.24:2, Mrk.13:2, Luk.6:37, Jhn.13:8, 1Co.8:13, al. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
μή
Transliteration:
Gloss:
not
Morphhology:
Greek, Negative
Definition:
μή, Elean μά [ᾱ] [Refs 6th c.BC+]. (Cf. Sanskrit mā´, Armenian mi [from I.-[Refs 5th c.BC+] mē´], negative used in prohibitions):—not, the negative of the will and thought, as οὐ of fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. (A few examples of μηδέ and μηδείς have been included.) A) in INDEPENDENT sentences, used in expressions of will or wish, command, entreaty, warning, A.1) with present imperative, 2 person, μή μ᾽ ἐρέθιζε [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rarely with aorist imperative, μὴ. ἔνθεο τιμῇ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect, μὴ ψεῦσον, ὦ Ζεῦ, τῆς. ἐλπίδος [Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect imperative [Refs 8th c.BC+] person when perfect = present, μὴ κεκράγετε [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.2) with subjunctive (usually [Refs], in prohibitions, μὴ δή με. ἐάσῃς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μή τοί με κρύψῃς τοῦτο[Refs 5th c.BC+]: coupled with present imperative, μὴ βοηθήσητε τῷ πεπονθότι δεινά, μὴ εὐορκεῖτε [Refs 8th c.BC+] person present subjunctive, μὴ κάμνῃς [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with the hortative subjunctive used to supply the [Refs] person of the imperative, present μὴ ἴομεν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: aorist μὴ πάθωμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: rarely with 1st pers. singular, μή σε. κιχείω [Refs 8th c.BC+] (anapaest meter). A.2.b) with present or aorist subjunctive in a warning or statement of fear, μὴ. γένησθε take care you do not become, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μὴ. ὑφαίνῃσιν I fear. may prove to be weaving, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: in Attic dialect Prose, to make a polite suggestion of apprehension or hesitation, perhaps, μὴ ἀγροικότερον ᾖ τὸ ἀληθὲς εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in later Greek the indicative is found, μὴ ἡ ἔννοια ἡμῶν. ἀντιλαμβάνεται [Refs 5th c.AD+] A.3) with future indicative, a uncertain usage (νεμεσήσετ᾽ is subjunctive in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μὴ βουλήσεσθε (Papyrus βούλη[σθ]ε) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.4) with past tenses of indicative to express an unfulfilled wish, μὴ ὄφελες λίσσεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.5) with optative to express a negative wish, with present, ἃ μὴ κραίνοι τύχη [Refs 4th c.BC+]: more frequently with aorist, μὴ σέ γ᾽ ἐν ἀμφιάλῳ Ἰθάκῃ βασιλῆα Κρονίων ποιήσειεν [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.6) in oaths and asseverations, ἴστω Ζεὺς, μὴ μὲν τοῖς ἵπποισιν ἀνὴρ ἐποχήσεται ἄλλος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.7) with infinitive, when used as imperative, μὴ δή μοι ἀπόπροθεν ἰσχέμεν ἵππους [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.8) frequently without a Verb, εἰ χρή, θανοῦμαι. Answ. μὴ σύ γε (i.e. θάνῃς) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἄπελθε νῦν. Answ. μὴ (i.e. γενέσθω) ἀλλά nay but, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in curt expressions, μὴ τριβὰς ἔτι (i.e. ποιεῖσθε) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μή μοι σύ none of that to me! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μή μοι πρόφασιν no excuses! [Refs 5th c.BC+] B) in DEPENDENT clauses: B.1) with Final Conjs, ἵνα μή [Refs 8th c.BC+], that so, ὅπως ἂν. μηδέ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but B.1.b) μή alone, ={ἵνα μή}, lest, ἀπόστιχε μή τινοήσῃ Ἥρη [Refs 8th c.BC+]: future indicative and aorist subjunctive in consecutive clauses, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) in the protasis of conditional sentences, see at {εἰ} (for the exceptions see at {οὐ}), and with temporal conjunctions used conditionally, see at {ἐπειδάν, ὅταν, ὅτε}, etc. B.2.b) ὅτι μή except, ὅτι μὴ Χῖοι μοῦνοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅσα μὴ ἀποβαίνοντες provided only that they did not disembark, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.3) in later Gr, with causal Conjs, ὁ μὴ πιστεύων ἤδη κέκριται, ὅτι μὴ πεπίστευκεν [NT+2nd c.AD+] that, ὅτι μὴ ἐστὶν ἐπίπεδος οὕτως ἂν καταμάθοιμεν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] B.4) in relative clauses, which imply a condition or generality, ὃς δὲ μὴ εἶδέ κω τὴν κανναβίδα whoever, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὃ μὴ κελεύσει (perhaps κελεύσαι) Ζεύς such a thing as, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; λέγονθ᾽ ἃ μὴ δεῖ such things as one ought not, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: frequently with subjunctive, ᾧ μὴ ἄλλοι ἀοσσητῆρες ἔωσιν [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.5) with infinitive, B.5.a) regularlyfrom Homer on, except after Verbs of saying and thinking (but see below c): after ὥστε or ὡς, ὥστε μὴ φρονεῖν [Refs 4th c.BC+]: always when the infinitive takes the Article, τὸ μὴ προμαθεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.5.b) by an apparent pleonasm after Verbs of negative result signifying to forbid, deny, and the like, ὁ δ᾽ ἀναίνετο μηδὲν ἑλέσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] (μηδέν); ἀντιλέγειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μηδέ); ἀπαγορεύειν [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μηδέ); ἀποτρέπεσθαι [Refs] (μηδέν); ἀρνεῖσθαι, ἔξαρνος εἶναι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παύειν (where the participle is more frequently) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in these cases the Article frequently precedes μή, τὸ δὲ μὴ λεηλατῆσαι. ἔσχε τόδε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐξομῇ τὸ μὴ εἰδένα; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴργειν τὸ μή. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐμποδὼν γίγνεσθαι τοῦ μή. [Refs] B.5.c) after Verbs of saying and thinking which involve an action of will, as in those signifying to swear, aver, believe, and the like; so after ὄμνυμι, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: occasionally with other Verbs, φημί [Refs 5th c.BC+]; λέγω, προλέγω, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πάντες ἐροῦσι μή. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; νομίζω[Refs 5th c.BC+]: very frequently in later Gr, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.6) with the participle, when it can be resolved into a conditional clause, μὴ ἐνείκας, = {εἰ μὴ ἤνεικε}, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὴ θέλων, ={εἰ μὴ θέλεις}, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; μὴ δολώσαντος θεοῦ, ={εἰ μὴ ἐδόλωσε}, [Refs]; μὴ δρῶν, ={εἰ μὴ δρῴην}, [Refs 5th c.BC+], = ut qui nihil sciam, [Refs]; τίς πρὸς ἀνδρὸς μὴ βλέποντος ἄρκεσι; one who sees not, [Refs]: in this signification frequently with the Article, ὁ μὴ λεύσσων [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with causal significance, μὴ παρὼν θαυμάζεται [Refs 5th c.BC+]: very frequently in later Greek, [Refs 1st c.AD+]: occasionally after Verbs of knowing and showing, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.7) with Substantives, adjectives, and adverbs used generically, with or without Article, τὰ μὴ δίκαια [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ μὴ 'μπειρία, ={τὸ μὴ ἔχειν ἐμπειρίαν}, want of experience, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; δῆμον καὶ μὴ δῆμον[Refs 4th c.BC+] B.8) after Verbs expressing fear or apprehension (compare μὴ οὐ): B.8.a) when the thing feared is future, mostly with subjunctive: with present subjunctive, δεινῶς ἀθυμῶ μὴ βλέπων ὁ μάντις ᾖ shall proveto be, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: more frequently with aorist, δείδοικα. μή σε παρείπῃ [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with perfect, shall prove to have been, δέδοικα μὴ περαιτέρω πεπραγμέν᾽ ᾖ μοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: less frequently with future indicative, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with optative according to the sequence of moods and tenses: present optative, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: perfect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with future optative in oratio obliqua, [Refs 5th c.BC+]vect.4.41. B.8.b) when the action is present or past, the indicative is used, εἰσόρα μὴ σκῆψιν οὐκ οὖσαν τίθης [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.8.c) with indicative and subjunctive in consecutive clauses, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) in QUESTIONS: C.I) direct questions, C.I.1) with indicative, where aneg. answer is anticipated (but more generally in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μή σοι δοκοῦμεν; [Refs 5th c.BC+] (μηδέ) follows οὐ, see at {οὐ μή}. C.I.1.b) in other questions, τί μὴ ποιήσ; what am I not to do? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί μ; why not? [Refs]; compare μήν C.I.2) with subjunctive, when the speaker deliberates about a negative action, μὴ οὕτω φῶμε; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοιοῦτος μὴ δῷ δίκη; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; πῶς μὴ φῶμε; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; how can a man help being excited when he speaks? [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II) indirect questions, frequently with Verbs implying fear and apprehension [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also σκοπεῖσθαι πῶς ἂν μή. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; later in simple indirect questions, ἐπυνθάνετο μὴ ἔγνω [Refs 2nd c.AD+] C.II.2) in questions introduced by εἰ, ἤρετό με. εἰ μὴ μέμνημαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴτε. εἴτε μή, εἰ. ἢ οὔ, εἰ. ἢ μή without difference of meaning between μή and οὐ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D) POSITION of μή. When the negative extends its power over the whole clause, μή properly precedes the Verb. When its force is limited to single words, it precedes those words. But Poets sometimes put μή after the Verb, ὄλοιο μή πω [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φράσῃς. μὴ πέρα[Refs] D.2) μή is sometimes repeated, μή, μή καλέσῃς [Refs 5th c.BC+] E) PROSODY: in Trag. μή may be joined by synizesis with a following ει or ου, μὴ οὐ, μὴ εἰδέναι, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: initial ε after μή is cut off by aphaeresis, μὴ 'πὁθουν [Refs] followed by α is sometimes written μἀ. (see. μὴ ἀλλά, etc.); sometimes separately, μὴ ἀδικεῖν [Refs 4th c.BC+] F) μή in COMPOSITION (joined with other words), as μὴ ἀλλά, μὴ γάρ, μὴ οὐ, μὴ ὅπως or ὅτι, μή ποτε, etc, will be found in alphabetical order.
Strongs
Word:
μή
Transliteration:
mḗ
Pronounciation:
may
Language:
Greek
Definition:
(adverb) not, (conjunction) lest; also (as an interrogative implying a negative answer (whereas g3756 (οὐ) expects an affirmative one)) whether; any but (that), X forbear, + God forbid, + lack, lest, neither, never, no (X wise in), none, nor, (can-)not, nothing, that not, un(-taken), without; a primary particle of qualified negation (whereas g3756 (οὐ) expresses an absolute denial);

having feared
Strongs:
Word:
φοβηθεὶς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Passive Deponent Participle Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
an ACTION that was happening – done by a male person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
fearing
Tyndale
Word:
φοβέω
Transliteration:
phobeō
Gloss:
to fear
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
φοβέέω, ῶ (< φόβος) [in LXX chiefly for מִן יָרֵא;] 1) in Hem, to put to flight. Pass, to be put to flight, to flee affrighted 2) to terrify, frighten (Wis 179; Hdt. and Att.). Pass. (so always in NT; cf. M, Pr., 162), to be seized with fear, be affrighted, fear: Mat.10:31 14:27, Mrk.5:33 6:50, Luk.1:13 8:50, Jhn.6:19 12:15, Act.16:38, al; opp. to ὑψηλοφρονεῖν, Rom.11:20; σφόδρα, Mat.17:6 27:54; with cogn. accusative, φόβον μέγαν, Mrk.4:41, Luk.2:9 (1Ma.10:8); φόβον αὐτῶν (obj, genitive, but cf. ICC, in l), 1Pe.3:14; πτόησιν, 1Pe.3:6; with accusative of person(s), Mat.10:26, Mrk.11:18, Luk.19:21, Jhn.9:22, Act.9:26, Rom.13:3, al; before ἀπό (like Heb. יָרֵא, Jer.1:8, al; cf. M, Pr., 102, 104n„), Mat.10:28, Luk.12:4; before μή (cl; Bl, § 65, 3; M, Pr., 184 f.), Act.23:10 27:17; μήπως, Act.27:29, 2Co.11:3 12:20, Gal.4:11; μήποτε, Heb.4:1; with inf. (Bl, § 69, 4; M, Pr., 205), Mat.1:20, Mrk.9:32, al; of reverential fear: Mrk.6:20, Eph.5:33; τ. θεόν, Luk.1:50, Act.10:2, 1Pe.2:17, Rev.14:7, al; τ. κύριον, Col.3:22, Rev.15:4; τ. ὄνομα τ. θεοῦ (see: ὄνομα), Rev.11:18; οἱ φοβούμενοι τ. θεόν, of proselytes, Act.13:16, 26 (cf. ἐκ-φοβέω) (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
φοβέω
Transliteration:
phobeō
Gloss:
to fear
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
φοβέω, 3rd.pers. plural imperative φοβεόντων [Refs 5th c.BC+]: Ionic dialect imperfect φοβέεσκον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: future -ήσω[Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist ἐφόβησα [Refs 8th c.BC+] —passive and middle, Ionic dialect [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect imperative φοβεῦ or φοβέο, [Refs]: Epic dialect 3rd.pers. plural imperfect φοβέοντο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: future φοβήσομαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: aorist passive ἐφοβήθην [Refs 8th c.BC+]; aorist middle ἐφοβησάμην only [Refs]: perfect πεφόβημαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: pluperfect 3rd.pers. plural ἐπεφόβηντο [Refs 5th c.BC+], Epic dialect πεφοβήατο [Refs 8th c.BC+] A) active, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in the sense put to flight, [ἴρηξ] ἐφόβησε κολοιούς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] καὶ ἄλκιμον ἄνδρα φοβεῖ[Refs 8th c.BC+] II) terrify, alarm, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῷ μὲν Τισσαφέρνει τοὺς Ἀθηναίους φ, ἐκείνοις δὲ τὸν Τισσαφέρνην to frighten the Athenians with T, and T. with the Athenians, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with participle, λέγοντες φ. τινάς by saying, [Refs 5th c.BC+]by terror, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) c.accusative of things, threaten with, φ. λιμόν [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) passive and middle, in [Refs 8th c.BC+] always in the sense to be put to flight (compare [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also participle, μὴ καὶ πεφοβημένος ἔλθης [Refs]in flight, [Refs] to flee before him,[Refs] B.II) to be seized with fear, be affrighted, [Refs 5th c.BC+] —Constr, B.II.1) absolutely, πεφόβημαι πτηνῆς ὡς ὄμμα πελείας [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φοβηθέντες ᾤχοντο φεύγοντες flying in terror, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἃ μὴ οἶδα. οὐδέποτε φοβήσομαι οὐδὲ φεύξομαι, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.2) followed by Preps, φ. ἀπό τινος to be afraid of one (probably a Hebraism), [LXX+NT]; ἔκ τινος from some cause, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἴς τι to be alarmed at a thing, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; ἐπί τινι fear for. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; but φ. ἀμφὶ γυναικί fear about, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.3) followed by a relative clause, φοβεῑσθαι μὴ. fear lest a thing will be, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φ. ὅπως μὴ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φ. μὴ οὐ. [Refs]; frequently c.accusative followed by μή, ταῦτ᾽ οὖν φοβοῦμαι, μὴ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φ. τοὺς οὐσίαν κεκτημένους, μὴ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φ. ὑπέρ τινος, μὴ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with infinitive followed by μή, φοβοίμην ἂν τῷ ἡγεμόνι ἕπεσθαι, μὴ ἀγάγῃ κτλ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] ={φ. μὴ}, in a more positive sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φ. τόδε, ὅτι. [Refs 5th c.BC+]: διὰ τοῦτο φ. τινας, ὅτι. Isocrates [Refs]; less frequently φ. ὡς. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.4) with infinitive with Article, φ. τὸ ἀποθνῄσκειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: more frequently with infinitive alone, fear to do, be afraid of doing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with infinitive future, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.5) with accusative person, stand in awe of, dread, δαίμονας τοὺς ἐνθάδε [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.6) with accusative of things, fear or fear about a thing, βρόμον [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.7) with genitive, πεφοβημένος νυκτός, θαλάσσης, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.8) with participle, προδιδοὺς φοβηθείς [Refs 4th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
φοβέω
Transliteration:
phobéō
Pronounciation:
fob-eh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to frighten, i.e. (passively) to be alarmed; by analogy, to be in awe of, i.e. revere; be (+ sore) afraid, fear (exceedingly), reverence; from g5401 (φόβος);

the
Strongs:
Word:
τὸν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»014:G2372
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

anger
Strongs:
Word:
θυμὸν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
θυμός
Transliteration:
thumos
Gloss:
wrath
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
θυμός, -οῦ, ὁ (< θύω), [in LXX most freq. for אַף, also for חֱמָא, חָרוֹן, etc, 30 words in all;] passion, hot anger, wrath: Heb.11:27; ὀργὴ καὶ θ, Rom.2:8, cf. Col.3:8; πικρία κ. θ, Eph.4:31; πλησθῆναι, πλήρης θυμοῦ, Luk.4:28, Act.19:28; θ. ἔχειν, Rev.12:12; οἶνος τ. θυμοῦ τ. πορνείας (cf. Jer.51:7), Rev.14:8 18:3 (cf. Rev.17:2); οἶνος τ. θ. τ. θεοῦ, Rev.14:10; τ. ὀργῆς τ. θεοῦ, Rev.16:19 19:15; ὁ θ. τ. θεοῦ, Rev.14:19 15:1, 7 16:1; pl, impulses or outbursts of anger: ἔρις, ζῆλος, θυμοὶ, ἐριθίαι, 2Co.12:20, Gal.5:20 (Cremer, 287, 733). SYN.: ὀργή, παροργισμός (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
θυμός
Transliteration:
thumos
Gloss:
wrath
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
θῡμός, ὁ, soul, spirit, as the principle of life, feeling and thought, especially of strong feeling and passion (rightly derived from θύω (B) by [Refs 5th c.BC+] I) in physical sense, breath, life, θ. ἀπηύρα, ἀφελέσθαι, ἐξαίνυσθαι, ὀλέσαι, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀπὸ δ᾽ ἔπτατο θ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of animals, [Refs], etc: less frequently in Trag, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2) spirit, strength, τείρετο δ᾽ ἀνδρῶν θ. ὑπ᾽ εἰρεσίης [Refs 8th c.BC+] I.3) πάτασσε δὲ θ. ἑκάστου each man's heart beat high, [Refs] II) soul, as shown by the feelings and passions; and so, II.1) desire or inclination, especially desire for meat and drink, appetite, πιέειν ὅτε θ. ἀνώγοι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; βαλέειν δέ ἑ ἵετο θ[Refs]; θ. ἐποτρύνῃ [τινά] [Refs 8th c.BC+]; θ. ἐπέσσυταί τινι, ἐφορμᾶται, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἤθελε θυμῷ he wished in his heart or with all his heart, [Refs]; so later θυμῷ βουλόμενοι wishing with all their heart, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἄρχ᾽ αὐτὸς ὥς σοι θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅπου ὑμῖν θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) mind, temper, will, θ. πρόφρων, ἵλαος, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἕνα θ. ἔχειν to be of one mind, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἐμὸν θ. ἔπειθεν[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) spirit, courage, μένος καὶ θ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πᾶσιν δὲ παραὶ ποσὶ κάππεσε θ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ψῦχρος ἔγεντο θ, of doves, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ἴωμεν ῥώμῃ καὶ θυμῷ ἐπί. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; personified, Passion, Emotion, opposed to Λογισμός, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.4) the seat of anger, χωόμενον κατὰ θυμόν [Refs 8th c.BC+]: hence, anger, wrath, δάμασον θυμόν [Refs]; εἴξας ᾧ θυμῷ[Refs 5th c.BC+]; θυμῷ falsa lectio for{θυμοῦ} in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; opposed to λογισμός, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπανάγειν τὸν θ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of horses, [Refs 5th c.BC+], fits of anger, passions, περὶ φόβων τε καὶ θυμῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.5) the heart, as the seat of the emotions, especially joy or grief, χαῖρε, γήθησε δὲ θυμῷ, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; δόκησε δ᾽ ἄρα σφίσι θ. ὣς ἔμεν ὡς εἰ. they felt as glad at heart as if, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; μηδ᾽ ὀνίαισι δάμνα. θ. [Refs 7th c.BC+]; of fear, δέος ἔμπεσε θυμῷ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; of love, τὴν ἐκ θυμοῦ φίλεον [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ἐμῷ κεχαρισμένε θυμῷ my heart's beloved, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; reversely, ἀπὸ θ. μᾶλλον ἐμοὶ ἔσεαι wilt be alien from my heart, [Refs]; ἐκ θ. πεσέειν, i.e. to lose thy favour,[Refs 5th c.BC+] II.6) mind, soul, as the seat of thought, ταῦθ᾽ ὥρμαινε κατὰ φρένα καὶ κατὰ θ. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; φράζετο θυμῷ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἐς θ. φέρω I bring him not into my mind or thoughts, [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
θυμός
Transliteration:
thymós
Pronounciation:
thoo-mos'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
passion (as if breathing hard); fierceness, indignation, wrath; from g2380 (θύω);

of the
Strongs:
Word:
τοῦ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Genitive Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
the
Conjoined:
»018:G935
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

king;
Strongs:
Word:
βασιλέως
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Noun Genitive Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a male PERSON OR THING that something belongs to
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
king
Tyndale
Word:
βασιλεύς
Transliteration:
basileus
Gloss:
king
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
βασιλεύς, -έως, ὁ, [in LXX chiefly for מֶלֶךְ;] a king: Mat.1:6 2:1; used by courtesy of Herod the Tetrarch, Mat.14:9; of the Roman Emperor, as freq. in κοινή (Deiss, LAE, p. 367), 1Pe.2:13, 17; of the Christ, in the phrase ὁ β. τ. Ἰουδαίων, Mat.2:2, al; τοῦ Ἰσραήλ, Mrk.15:32, Jhn.1:50 12:13; of God, Mat.5:35, 1Ti.1:17, Rev.15:3; β. βασιλέων, Rev.17:14 19:16; β. τ. βασιλευόντων, 1Ti.6:15 (on the associations of the word to Jewish Hellenists, see Cl. Rev., i, 7). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
βασιλεύς
Transliteration:
basileus
Gloss:
king
Morphhology:
Greek, Noun, Male
Definition:
βᾰσῐλ-εύς, ὁ, genitive έως, Epic dialect ῆος, [Refs 5th c.AD+] Oracle texts cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+] Aeolic dialect -ηες[Refs 7th c.BC+] old Attic dialect -ῆς[Refs 5th c.BC+]:— king, chief, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: frequently with collateral sense of captain or judge, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; later, hereditary king, opposed to τύραννος, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but also of tyrants, as Hiero, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of Gelo, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; of Pisistratus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: joined with a substantive, βασιλεὺς ἀνήρ [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἄναξ β. lord king, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἰωνῶν β, of the eagle, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: comparative βασιλεύτερος more kingly, [Refs 8th c.BC+]: superlative βασιλεύτατος [Refs 8th c.BC+] b) of the gods, Ζεὺς θεῶν β. [Refs 8th c.BC+]; as cult title of Zeus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μέγας β, of God, [LXX+1st c.AD+]: superlative βασιλεύτατοι τῶν θεῶν [Refs 2nd c.AD+] 2) as a title of rank, prince, β. εἰσὶ καὶ ἄλλοι πολλοὶ ἐν. Ἰθάκῃ [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc; of Cyrus, [Refs 5th c.BC+] 2.b) descendant of a royal house, especially in Ionia, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; βασιλέων οἶκοι 'estates of the royal house', name of a district in Chios, Ἀθηνᾶ [Refs] 3) generally, lord, master, [Refs 8th c.BC+] 4) metaphorically, πόλεμος πάντων β. [Refs 5th c.BC+] II) at Athens, the second of the nine Archons, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.2) title of magistrates in other Greek states, as βασιλᾶες at Elis, [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.3) at Rome, β. τῶν ἱερῶν, = rex sacrorum, [Refs 1st c.BC+] III) after the Persian war (without Article), the king of Persia, [Refs 5th c.BC+] of the Satraps, [Refs 5th c.BC+] III.2) of Alexander and his successors, usually with Article, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; Ἀντίγονος Alex.III; Πτολεμαῖος [Refs 1st c.BC+]; title used by Parthian kings, [Refs 1st c.AD+]; of God, [NT] III.3) of the Roman emperors, [NT+1st c.AD+] IV) of any great man, πένησί τε καὶ βασιλεῦσιν [Refs 1st c.AD+] IV.2) first or most distinguished of any class, Ἡρώδην τὸν β. τῶν λόγων [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; winner at a game, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Stoic sage, μόνος β. [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; βασιλέως ἐγκέφαλος 'morsel fit for a king', [Refs 4th c.BC+]; β. σῦκα, name of a choice kind, Philem.Legal. cited in [Refs 2nd c.AD+] V) ={συμποσίαρχος}, [Refs 1st c.AD+] VI) wren, [Refs 4th c.BC+] VII) queen-bee,[Refs] is scanned?~X?~X ¯ in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; codices βασίλεια.)
Strongs
Word:
βασιλεύς
Transliteration:
basileús
Pronounciation:
bas-il-yooce'
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Noun Masculine
Definition:
a sovereign (abstractly, relatively, or figuratively); king; probably from g939 (βάσις) (through the notion of a foundation of power);

the
Strongs:
Word:
τὸν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Definite article Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
a SPECIFIC male person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Conjoined:
»024:G517
Tyndale
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, ἡ, τό, the prepositive article (ἄρθρον προτακτικόν), originally a demonstr. pron. (so usually in Hom.), in general corresponding to the Eng. definite article. I. As demonstr. pron. 1) As freq. in Hom, absol, he (she, it), his (etc.): Act.17:28 (quoted from the poet Aratus). 2) Distributive, ὁ μὲν. ὁ δέ, the one. the other: 1Co.7:7, Gal.4:22; pl, Act.14:4, 17:32, Php.1:16, al; οἱ μὲν. ἄλλοι δέ, Mat.16:14, Jhn.7:12; οἱ μεν̀. ὁδέ, Heb.7:21, 23. 3) In narration (without ὁ μὲν preceding), ὁ δέ, but he: Mat.2:14, Mrk.1:45, Luk.8:21, Jhn.9:38, al. mult. II. As prepositive article, the, prefixed, 1) to nouns unmodified: ὁ θεός, τὸ φῶς, etc; to abstract nouns, ἡ σοφία, etc, to pl. nouns which indicate a class, οἱ ἀλώπεκες, foxes, Mat.8:20, al; to an individual as representing a class, ὁ ἐργάτης, Luk.10:7; with nom. = voc. in addresses, Mat.11:26, Jhn.19:3, Jas.5:1, al; to things which pertain to one, ἡ χεῖρ, his hand, Mrk.3:1; to names of persons well known or already mentioned; usually to names of countries (originally adjectives), ἡ Ἰουδαία, etc. 2) To modified nouns: with of person(s) pron. genitive, μοῦ, σοῦ, etc; with poss. pron, ἐμός, σός, etc; with adj. between the art. and the noun, ὁ ἀγαθὸς ἄνθρωπος, Mat.12:35; the noun foll, by adj, both with art, ὁ ποιμὴν ὁ καλός, Jhn.10:11 (on ὁ ὄχλος πολύς, Jhn.12:9, see M, Pr., 84); before adjectival phrases, ἡ κατ᾽ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις, Rom.9:11. 3) To Other parts of speech used as substantives; (a) neuter adjectives: τ. ἀγαθόν, etc; (b) cardinal numerals: ὁ εἶς, οἷ δύο, etc; (with) participles: ὁ βαπτίζων (= ὁ Βαπτιστής, Mat.14:2), Mrk.6:14; πᾶς ὁ, with ptcp, every one who, etc; (d) adverbs: τὸ πέραν, τὰ νῦν, ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος; (e) infinitives: nom, τὸ θέλειν, Rom.7:18, al; genitive, τοῦ, after adjectives, ἄξιον τοῦ πορεύεσθαι, 1Co.16:4; verbs, ἐλαχεν τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι, Luk.1:9; and freq. in a final sense, ἐξῆλθεν ὁ σπείρειν, Mat.13:3 (on the artic. inf, see Bl, §71). 4) In the neut. to sentences, phrases or single words treated as a quotation: τὸ Ἐι δύνῃ, Mrk.9:23; τὸ ἔτι ἅπαξ, Heb.12:27; τὸ ἀνέβη, Eph.4:9, al. 5) To prepositional phrases: οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰταλίας, Heb.13:24; οἱ ἐκ νόμου, Rom.4:14; neut. accusative absol, in adverbial phrases, τὸ καθ᾽ ἡμέραν, daily, Luk.11:3; τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, as regards the flesh, Rom.9:5. 6) To nouns in the genitive, denoting kinship, association, etc: ὁ τοῦ, the son of (unless context indicates a different relationship), Mat.10:2, al; τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, the things that pertain to God, Mat.16:23; τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης, Rom.14:19 (cf. M, Pr., 81ff; Bl, §§46, 47). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Gloss:
the/this/who
Morphhology:
Greek, Article
Definition:
, , τό, is, when thus written, A) demonstrative Pronoun. B ) in Attic dialect, definite or prepositive Article. C ) in Epic dialect, the so-called postpositive Article, = relative Pronoun, ὅς, ἥ, ὅ.—The nominative masculine and feminine singular and plural, ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ, have no accent in codices and most printed books, except when used as the relative; but ὁ, ἡ, οἱ, αἱ differ only in writing from ὃ, ἣ, οἳ, α; the nominative forms of the article are said by Hdn.Gr.1.474 to be oxytone, and by [Refs 2nd c.AD+] in Aeolic dialect accusative to [Refs 8th c.BC+] genitive and dative dual τοῖιν [Refs 8th c.BC+]— In Doric dialect and all other dialects except Attic dialect and Ionic dialect the feminine forms preserve the old ᾱ instead of changing it to η, hence Doric dialect etc. ἁ, τάν, τᾶ; the genitive plural τάων contracts in many dialects to τᾶ; the genitive singular is in many places τῶ, accusative plural τώς, but Cretan dialect, etc, τόνς [Refs]; in Lesbian Aeolic dialect the accusative plural forms are τοὶς, ταὶς, [Refs]; dative plural τοῖς, ταῖς (or τοὶς, ταὶς, see above), [Refs]; ταῖσι as demonstrative, [Refs 7th c.BC+] Poets also used the Ionic dialect and _Epic dialect_ forms τοῖσι, ταῖσ; and in Trag. we find τοὶ μέν, τοὶ δέ, for οἱ μέν, οἱ δέ, not only in Lyric poetry, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; but even in a trimeter, [Refs 5th c.BC+] {ὅ}; τὼ πόλεε Foed. cited in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in [Refs 4th c.AD+] functions as genitive dual feminine, μεσακόθεν τοῖς κράναιυν [Refs 4th c.BC+] —in Elean and _Boeotian dialect_ ὁ, ἡ (ἁ), τό, with the addition of -ί, ={ὅδε}, ἥδε, τόδε, _nominative_ _plural_ _masculine_ τυΐ the following men, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] cf. Sanskrit demonstrative pronoun sa, sā, Gothic sa, sō, ONorse sá, sú, Old Latin accusative sum, sam (Enn.): —with τό [from *τόδ] cf. Sanskrit tat (tad), Latin is-tud, Gothic pata: —with τοί cf. Sanskrit te, Lithuanian tĩe, O[Refs 5th c.BC+] pá, etc:—with τάων cf. Sanskrit tāsām, Latin is-tarum:— the origin of the relative ὅς, ἥ, ὅ (which see) is different.) A) ὁ, ἡ, τό, DEMONSTR. PRONOUN, that, the oldest and in [Refs 8th c.BC+] the commonest sense: frequently also in [Refs 5th c.BC+], and sometimes in Trag. (mostly in Lyric poetry, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τῶν γάρ, τῆς γάρ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; seldom in Attic dialect Prose, except in special phrases, see infr. VI, VII): A.I) joined with a substantive, to call attention to it, ὁ Τυδεΐδης he—Tydeus' famous son, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; τὸν Χρύσην that venerable man Chryses, I.II: and so with appellative, Νέστωρ ὁ γέρων N.—thataged man, [Refs]; αἰετοῦ. τοῦ θηρητῆρος the eagle, that which is called hunter, [Refs]; also to define and give emphasis, τιμῆς τῆς Πριάμου for honour, namely that of Priam, [Refs]; οἴχετ᾽ ἀνὴρ ὤριστος a man is gone, and he the best, [Refs]:—different from this are cases [Refs 8th c.BC+] if he would help the Trojans, but drive those back to the ships—I mean the Achaeans, where Ἀχ. is only added to explain τούς, compare [Refs] A.II) frequently without a substantive, he, she, it, ὁ γὰρ ἦλθε [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.III) placed after its Noun, before the Relat. Prons, ἐφάμην σὲ περὶ φρένας ἔμμεναι ἄλλων, τῶν ὅσσοι Λυκίην ναιετάουσι far above the rest, above those to wit who, etc, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οἷ᾽ οὔ πώ τιν᾽ ἀκούομεν οὐδὲ παλαιῶν, τάων αἳ πάρος ἦσαν. Ἀχαιαί such as we have not heard tell of yet even among the women of old, those women to wit who, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —for the _Attic dialect_ usage see below A.IV) before a Possessive pronoun its demonstrative force is sometimes very manifest, φθίσει σε τὸ σὸν μένος that spirit of thine, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.V) for cases in which the Homeric usage approaches most nearly to the Attic, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI) ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ. without a substantive, in all cases, genders, and numbers, [Refs 8th c.BC+] properly refers to the former, ὁ δέ to the latter; more rarely ὁ μέν the latter, ὁ δέ the former, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes in Partition, the one, the other, etc.—The Noun with it is regularly in genitive plural, being divided by the ὁ μέν, ὁ δέ, into parts, ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι, τῶν δ᾽ αἱ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἱ δὲ χιτῶνας εἵατο [Refs 8th c.BC+]: but frequently the Noun is in the same case, by a kind of apposition, ἴδον υἷε Δάρητος, τὸν μὲν ἀλευάμενον τὸν δὲ κτάμενον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: so in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; if the Noun be collective, it is in the genitive singular, ὁ μὲν πεπραμένος ἦν τοῦ σίτου, ὁ δὲ ἔνδον ἀποκείμενος [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.2) when a negative accompanies ὁ δέ, it follows δέ, e.g. τὰς γοῦν Ἀθήνας οἶδα τὸν δὲ χῶρον οὔ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.3) ὁ μέν τις, ὁ δέ τις. is used in Prose, when the Noun to which ὁ refers is left indefinite, ἔλεγον ὁ μέν τις τὴν σοφίαν, ὁ δὲ τὴν καρτερίαν, ὁ δέ τις καὶ τὸ κάλλος [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.4) on τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, or τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs] A.VI.5) ὁ μέν is frequently used without a corresponding ὁ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἐσκίδναντο, Μυρμιδόνας δ᾽ οὐκ εἴα ἀποσκίδνασθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; by ἄλλος δέ, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.6) ὁ δέ following μέν sometimes refers to the subject of the preceding clause, τοῦ μὲν ἅμαρθ᾽, ὁ δὲ Λεῦκον. βεβλήκει [Refs 8th c.BC+]: rare in Attic dialect Prose, ἐπεψήφιζεν αὐτὸς ἔφορος ὤν· ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἔφη διαγιγνώσκειν τὴν βοήν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VI.7) ὁ δέ is frequently used simply in continuing a narrative, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also used by [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VI.8) the opposition may be expressed otherwise than by μέν and δέ, οὔθ᾽ ὁ. οὔθ᾽ ὁ [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VII) the following usages prevailed in Attic dialect Prose, A.VII.1) in dialogue, after καί, it was usual to say in nominative singular masculine καὶ ὅ; in the other cases the usual forms of the Article were used (see. ὅς [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.I and cf. Sanskrit sas, alternatative form of sa); so, in accusative, καὶ τὸν εἰπεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VII.2) ὁ καὶ ὁ such and such, τῇ καὶ τῇ ἀτιμίᾳ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but mostly in accusative, καί μοι κάλει τὸν καὶ τόν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀνάγκη ἄρα τὸ καὶ τό it must then be so and so, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; but τὰ καὶ τά now one thing, now another, of good and bad, τὸν δ᾽ ἀγαθὸν τολμᾶν χρὴ τά τε καὶ τὰ φέρειν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; so πάντα τοῦ μετρίου μεταβαλλόμενα ἐπὶ τὰ καὶ ἐπὶ τά, of excess and defect, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII) absolutely usages of single cases, A.VIII.1) feminine dative τῇ, of Place, there, on that spot, here, this way, that way, [Refs 8th c.BC+], etc: also in Prose, τὸ μὲν τῇ, τὸ δὲ τῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.b) with a notion of motion towards, that way, in that direction, [Refs 8th c.BC+] —only poetry A.VIII.1.c) of Manner, τῇ περ τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν in this way, thus, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.d) repeated, τῇ μέν, τῇ δέ, in one way, in another, or partly, partly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.1.e) relative, where, by which way, only Epic dialect, as [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2) neuter dative τῷ, therefore, on this account, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.2.b) thus, so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] precedes, be translated, then, if this be so, on this condition, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.3) neuter accusative τό, wherefore, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also τὸ δέ absolutely, but the fact is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; even when the τό refers to what precedes, the contrast may lie not in the thing referred to, but in another part of the sentence (compare above[Refs 5th c.BC+]; φασὶ δέ τινες αὐτὸν καὶ τῶν ἑπτὰ σοφῶν γεγονέναι· τὸ δὲ οὐκ ἦν but he was not, [Refs 1st c.BC+] A.VIII.4) τὸ μέν, τὸ δέ, partly, partly, or on the one hand, on the other, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; more frequently τὰ μέν, τὰ δέ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] in the first clause, τὸ δέ τι [Refs] several times. and finally, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5) of Time, sometimes that time, sometimes this (present) time, συνμαχία κ᾽ ἔα ἑκατὸν ϝέτεα, ἄρχοι δέ κα τοΐ (where it is possible, but not necessary, to supply ϝέτος) [Refs 6th c.BC+] from that time, [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.b) πρὸ τοῦ, sometimes written προτοῦ, before this, aforetime, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.VIII.5.c) in Thess. Prose, ὑππρὸ τᾶς yesterday, τὰ ψαφίσματα τό τε ὑππρὸ τᾶς γενόμενον καὶ τὸ τᾶμον the decree which was passed yesterday (literal before this [day]), and to-day's, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.VIII.6) ἐν τοῖς is frequently used in Prose with Superlatives, ἐν τοῖσι θειότατον a most marvellous thing, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖς πρῶτοι the very first, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν τοῖσι πρῶτος (πρώτοις codices) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; [Ζεὺς] Ἔρωτά τε καὶ Ἀνάγκην ἐν τοῖς πρῶτα ἐγέννησεν first of all, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] the greatest number of ships, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also with adverbs, ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in late Prose, also with Positives, ἐν τοῖς παράδοξον [Refs 1st c.BC+] B) ὁ, ἡ, τό, THE DEFINITE ARTICLE, the, to specify individuals: rare in this signification in the earliest Gr, becoming commoner later. In [Refs 8th c.BC+] the demonstrative force can generally be traced, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I, but the definite Article must be recognized in places [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also when joined to an adjective to make it a substantive, αἰὲν ἀποκτείνων τὸν ὀπίστατον the hindmost man, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also in τῶν ἄλλων [Refs]; also τὸ τρίτον[Refs]; τὸ μὲν ἄλλο for the rest,[Refs]—The true Article, however, is first fully established in 5th C Attic dialect, whilst the demonstrative usage disappears, except in a few cases, V. [Refs 4th c.BC+] —Chief usages, especially in _Attic dialect_ B.I) not only with common Appellats, adjectives, and Parts, to specify them as present to sense or mind, but also frequently where we use the Possessive pronoun, τὸ κέαρ ηὐφράνθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὴν κεφαλὴν κατεάγην my head was broken, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τοὺς φίλους ποιούμεθα we make our friends, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰς πόλεις ἔκτιζον they began founding their cities, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.b) omitted with proper nounsand frequently with Appellats. which require no specification, as θεός, βασιλεύς, see at {θεός} [Refs] III; ἐμ πόλει in the Acropolis, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare Θράσυλος in [Refs]; or when the person spoken of is to be specially distinguished, Ζεύς, ὅστις ὁ Ζεύς whoever this Zeus is, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; and therefore properly omitted when a special designation follows, as Σωκράτης ὁ φιλόσοφος: seldom in Trag. with proper nouns, save to give peculiar emphasis, like Latin ille, ὁ Λάϊος, ὁ Φοῖβος, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.c) Aristotle says Σωκράτης meaning the historical Socrates, as in [Refs] when he means the Platonic Socrates, as [Refs] B.I.d) for Σαῦλος ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, etc, see at {καί} [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) in a generic sense, where the individual is treated as a type, οἷς ὁ γέρων μετέῃσιν. λεύσσει [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.I.2.b) frequently with abstract Nouns, ἥ τε ἐλπὶς καὶ ὁ ἔρως [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.3) of outstanding members of a class, ὁ γεωγράφος, ὁ κωμικός, ὁ ποιητής, ὁ τεχνικός, see at {γεωγράφος}, κωμικός, ποιητής, τεχνικός. B.I.4) with infinitives, which thereby become Substantives, τὸ εἴργειν prevention, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ φρονεῖν good sense, [Refs 5th c.BC+]infinitive, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι the existence of gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ μηδένα εἶναι ὄλβιον the fact or statement that no one is happy, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.5) in neuter before any word or expression which itself is made the object of thought, τὸ ἄνθρωπος the word or notion man; τὸ λέγω the word λέγ; τὸ μηδὲν ἄγαν the sentiment 'ne quid nimis', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τῇ αὐτῇ the phrase τῇ αὐτῇ, [Refs 5th c.BC+] the opinion about the question 'who ought to rule', [Refs]; τὸ ἐὰν μένητε παρ᾽ ἐμοί, ἀποδώσω the phrase 'I will give back, if. ', [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ὀλίγοι the term few, [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.6) before relative clauses, when the Article serves to combine the whole relative clause into one notion, τῇ ᾗ φὴς σὺ σκληρότητι the harshness you speak of, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν ἥμερον καρπόν, καὶ τὸν ὅσος ξύλινος (i.e. καὶ τὸν καρπὸν ὅσος ἂν ᾖ ξύλινος) [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.7) before Prons, B.I.7.a) before the person Prons, giving them greater emphasis, but only in accusative, τὸν ἐμέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸν. σὲ καὶ ἐμέ[Refs] B.I.7.b) before the interrogative pronoun (both τίς and ποῖος), referring to something before, which needs to be more distinctly specified, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τῆς ποίας μερίδο; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; τοῖς ποίοις; [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.7.c) with τοιοῦτος, τοιόσδε, τηλικοῦτος, etc, the Article either makes the pronoun into a substantive, ὁ τοιοῦτος that sort of person, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or subjoins it to a substantive which already has an Article, τὴν ἀπολογίαν τὴν τοιαύτην [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.I.8) before ἅπας, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὸν ἕνα, τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον, [Refs 4th c.BC+] see entry; and on οἱ ἄλλοι, οἱ πολλοί, etc, see at {ἄλλος} [Refs] B.I.9) the Article with the comparative is rare, if ἤ follows, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II) elliptic expressions: B.II.1) before the genitive of a proper name, to express descent, son or daughter, Θουκυδίδης ὁ Ὀλόρου (i.e. υἱός) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ἑλένη ἡ τοῦ Διός (i.e. θυγάτηρ) [Refs 5th c.BC+]: also to denote other relationships, e.g. brother, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ Σμικυθίωνος Μελιστίχη M.the wife of [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Κλέαρχος καὶ οἱ ἐκείνου Cl. and his men, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ τοῦ Ἀντιγένεος the slave of [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.2) generally, before a genitive it indicates a wider relation, as τὸ τῶν νεῶν, τὸ τῶν Ἑρμῶν, the matter of the ships, the affair of the Hermae, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τοῦ Ἀρριβαίου πράσσειν to promote the interests of Arrhibaeus, [Refs]; τὸ τῆς τύχης,=ἡ τύχη, [Refs]; τὰ τῆς τύχης accidents, chance events, [Refs]; τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος performance of the rites due to the dead befits the living, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ τῶν θεῶν that which is destined by the gods, [Refs 5th c.BC+] what regards me or thee, my or thy business or interests, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: and with genitive of [Refs 5th c.BC+] is frequently also, a man's word or saying, as τὸ τοῦ Σόλωνος [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου as Homer says, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τά τινος so-and-so's house, [NT+5th c.BC+] B.II.3) very frequently with cases governed by Preps. αἱ ἐκ τῆς Ζακύνθου νῆες the ships from Zacynthus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ ἐπὶ Θρᾴκης the Thrace-ward district, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ καταστρώματος matters on deck, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπ᾽ Ἀλκιβιάδου the proposals of Alcibiades, [Refs]; τὰ ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης the incidents of fortune, [Refs] B.II.4) on μὰ τόν, μὰ τήν, etc, see at {μά} IV. B.II.5) in elliptical phrases, ἐπορευόμην τὴν ἔξω τείχους (i.e. ὁδόν) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἡ αὔριον (i.e. ἡμέρα), see at {αὔριον}; ἡ Λυδιστί (i.e. ἁρμονία) [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁ οἴκαδε πλοῦς [Refs 5th c.BC+], etc; but τό stands absolutely with Advs. of time and place, when one cannot (as in the preceding instances) supply a substantive, as κἀκεῖσε καὶ τὸ δεῦρο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὁ μὲν τὸ κεῖθεν, ὁ δὲ τὸ κεῖθεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) as RELATIVE PRONOUN in many dialects; both in nominative singular masculine ὅ, as κλῦθί μοι, ὃ χθιζὸς θεὸς ἤλυθες [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ ἐξορύξη he who banishes him, [Refs]; and in the forms beginning with τ, especially in [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also in Ionic dialect Poets, ἐν τῷ κάθημαι [Refs 7th c.BC+]; τό [Refs]; τῶν[Refs]—Never in Comedy texts or Attic dialect Prose:—Epic dialect genitive singular τεῦ [Refs 8th c.BC+] D) CRASIS OF ARTICLE: D.a) Attic dialect ὁ, ἡ, τό, with ᾰ make ᾱ, as ἁνήρ, ἁλήθεια, τἀγαθόν, τᾄτιο; so οἱ, αἱ, τά, as ἅνδρες, τἀγαθ; also τοῦ, τῷ, as τἀγαθοῦ, τἀγαθῷ: ὁ, τό, οἱ, before e gives ου, οὑξ, οὑπί, οὑμός, τοὔργον, οὑπιχώριοι, etc; also τοῦ, as τοὐμοῦ, τοὐπιόντο; but ἅτερος, θάτερον ([musical notation]), Ionic dialect οὕτερος, τοὔτερον (see. ἕτερος), Attic dialect feminine ἡτέρα, dative θητέρᾳ (see. ἕτερος); τῷ loses the iota, τὠμῷ, τὠπιόντι: ὁ, τό, before ο gives ου, as Οὁδυσσεύς, Οὑλύμπιος, τοὔνομα: ὁ, τό, etc, before αυ gives ᾱυ, αὑτός, ταὐτό, ταὐτῷ (frequently written ἁτός, etc. in Inscrr. and Papyrus); so τὰ αὐτά=ταὐτά, αἱ αὐταί=αὑταί: ἡ before εὐ gives ηὑ, as ηὑλάβεια: τῇ before ἡ gives θη, as θἠμέρᾳ: τὸ before ὑ gives θου, as θοὔδωρ for τὸ ὕδωρ. D.b) other dialects: in their treatment of crasis these follow the local laws of contraction, hence, e.g, Doric dialect ὡξ from ὁ ἐξ [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Ionic dialect ᾡσυμνήτης from ὁ αἰς-[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡυτή from ἡ αὐτή [Refs 1st c.AD+]
Strongs
Word:
Transliteration:
ho
Pronounciation:
to
Language:
Greek
Definition:
the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom); the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc; the definite article;

for
Strongs:
Word:
γὰρ
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
γάρ
Transliteration:
gar
Gloss:
for
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
γάρ, co-ordinating particle, contr. of γε ἄρα, verily then, hence, in truth, indeed, yea, then, why, and when giving a reason or explanation, for, the usage in NT being in general accord with that of cl; 1) explicative and epexegetic: Mat.4:18 19:12, Mrk.1:16 5:42 16:4, Luk.11:3 o, Rom.7:1, 1Co.16:5, al. 2) Conclusive, in questions, answers and exclamations: Mat.9:5 27:23, Luk.9:25 22:27, Jhn.9:30, Act.8:31 16:37 19:35, Rom.15:26, 1Co.9:10, Php.1:18 (Ellic, in l.), 1Th.2:20, al. 3) Causal: Mat.1:21 2:2, 5, 6, 3:23, Mrk.1:22, 9:6, Luk.1:15, 18, Jhn.2:25, Act.2:25, Rom.1:9, 11, 1Co.11:5, Rev.1:3, al; giving the reason for a command or prohibition, Mat.2:20 3:9, Rom.13:11, Col.3:3, 1Th.4:3, al; where the cause is contained in an interrog. statement, Luk.22:27, Rom.3:3 4:3, 1Co.10:29; καὶ γάρ, for also, Mrk.10:45, Luk.6:32, 1Co.5:7, al. id. as in cl. = etenim, where the καί loses its connective force (Bl, §78, 6; Kühner 3, ii, 854f.), Mrk.14:70, Luk.1:66 22:37, 2Co.13:4. The proper place of γάρ is after the first word in a clause, but in poets it often comes third or fourth, and so in late prose: 2Co.1:19. Yet "not the number but the nature of the word after which it stands is the point to be noticed" (see Thayer, see word). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
γάρ
Transliteration:
gar
Gloss:
for
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
γάρ (γε, ἄρα), causal conjunction, used alone or with other Particles. I) introducing the reason or cause of what precedes, for, τῷ γὰρ ἐπὶ φρεσὶ θῆκε θεὰ λευκώλενος Ἥρη· κήδετο γ. Δαναῶν [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but frequently in explanation of that which is implied in the preceding clause, πολλάων πολίων κατέλυσε κάρηνα. τοῦ γὰρ κράτος ἐστὶ μέγιστον [Refs] I.b) in simple explanations, especially after a Pronoun or demonstrative adjective, ἀλλὰ τόδ᾽ αἰνὸν ἄχος κραδίην καὶ θυμὸν ἱκάνει· Ἕκτωρ γ. ποτε φήσει [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὃ δὲ δεινότατον. ὁ Ζεὺς γ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in introducing proofs or examples, μαρτύριον δέ· Δήλου γ. καθαιρομένης. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τεκμήριον δέ· οὔτε γ. Λακεδαιμόνιοι. [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in full, τεκμήριον δὲ τούτου τόδε· αἱ μὲν γ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; παράδειγμα τόδε τοῦ λόγου· ἐκ γ. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.c) to introduce a detailed description or narration already alluded to, ὅμως δὲ λεκτέα ἃ γιγνώσκω· ἔχει γ. [ἡ χώρα] πεδία κάλλιστα. [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.d) in answers to questions or statements challenging assent or denial, yes, no. , οὔκουν. ἀνάγκη ἐστ;—ἀνάγκη γ. οὖν, ἔφη, ay doubtless it is necessary, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἱκανὸς γ, ἔφη, συμβαίνει γ, ἔφη, [Refs]; οὔκουν δὴ τό γ᾽ εἰκός.—οὐ γ: [Refs] I.2) by inversion, preceding the fact explained, since, as, Ἀτρεΐδη, πολλοὶ γ. τεθνᾶσιν Ἀχαιοί. τῷ σε χρὴ πόλεμον παῦσαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; χρόνου δὲ οὐ πολλοῦ διελθόντος (χρῆν γ. Κανδαύλῃ γενέσθαι κακῶς) ἔλεγε πρὸς τὸν Γύγην τοιάδε, Γύγη, οὐ γ. σε δοκέω πείθεσθαι. (ὦτα γ. τυγχάνει κτλ.), ποίει ὅκως. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; εἶεν, σὺ γ. τούτων ἐπιστήμων, τί χρὴ ποιεῖ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; the principal proposition is sometimes I.2.b) blended with the causal one, τῇ δὲ κακῶς γ. ἔδεε γενέσθαι εἶπε, i.e. ἡ δέ (κακῶς γ. οἱ ἔδεε γενέσθαι) εἶπε [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2.c) attached to the hypothet. Particle instead of being joined to the apodosis, οὐδ᾽ εἰ γ. ἦν τὸ πρᾶγμα μὴ θεήλατον, ἀκάθαρτον ὑμᾶς εἰκὸς ἦν οὕτως ἐᾶν, i.e. οὐδὲ γ. εἰ ἦν, [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.2.d) repeated, οὐ γ. οὖν σιγήσομαι· ἔτικτε γ. [Refs] I.3) in elliptical phrases, where that of which γάρ gives the reason is omitted, and must be supplied, I.3.a) frequently in Trag. dialogue and [Refs 5th c.BC+], when yes or no may be supplied from the context, καὶ δῆτ᾽ ἐτόλμας τούσδ᾽ ὑπερβαίνειν νόμου;—οὐ γ. τί μοι Ζεὺς ἦν ὁ κηρύξας τάδε [yes], for it was not Zeus, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; frequently in phrase ἔστι γ. οὕτω [yes], for so it is, i. e. yes certainly: λέγεταί τι καινό; γένοιτο γ. ἄν τι καινότερον ἢ; [why,] could there be? [Refs 5th c.BC+] [do so], yet shall ye never prevail by this means: for ἀλλὰ γ, see below[Refs] I.3.b) to confirm or strengthen something said, οἵδ᾽ οὐκέτ᾽ εἰσί· τοῦτο γάρ σε δήξεται [I say this], for it will sting thee, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: after an Exclamation, ὦ πόποι· ἀνάριθμα γ. φέρω πήματα [Refs 5th c.BC+] I.3.c) in conditional propositions, where the condition is omitted, else, οὐ γ. ἄν με ἔπεμπον πάλιν (i.e. εἰ μὴ ἐπίστευον) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; γίνεται γ. ἡ κοινωνία συμμαχία for in that case, [Refs 4th c.BC+] I.4) in abrupt questions, why, what, τίς γ. σε θεῶν ἐμοὶ ἄγγελον ἧκε; why who hath sent thee? [Refs 8th c.BC+]; πατροκτονοῦσα γ. ξυνοικήσεις ἐμο; what, wilt thou? [Refs 4th c.BC+]; what, was it? [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τί γ; quid enim? i. e. it must be so, [Refs]; τί γ. δή ποτ; [Refs 4th c.BC+]; also πῶς γ; πῶς γ. ο;, see at {πῶς}. I.5) to strengthen a wish, with optative, κακῶς γ. ἐξόλοιο O that you might perish! [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare αἴ, εἰ, εἴθε, πῶς. II) joined with other Particles: II.1) ἀλλὰ γ. where γάρ gives the reason of a clause to be supplied between ἀλλά and itself, as ἀλλ᾽ ἐν γὰρ Τρώων πεδίῳ. but [far otherwise], for, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἥκουσ᾽ αἵδ᾽ ἐπὶ πρᾶγος πικρόν but [hush], for, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽ οὐ γ. σ᾽ ἐθέλω. but [look out] for, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.2) γ. ἄρα for indeed, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.3) γ. δή for of course, for you know, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; φάμεν γ. δή yes certainly we say so, [Refs 5th c.BC+] II.4) γ. νυ [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.5) γ. οὖν for indeed, to confirm or explain, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; φησὶ γ. οὖν yes of course he says so, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare τοιγαροῦν. II.6) γ. που for I suppose, especially with negatives, [Refs] II.7) γ. ῥα, ={γὰρ ἄρα}, [Refs 8th c.BC+] II.8) γ. τε, [Refs]; also τε γ. [Refs 4th c.BC+] II.9) γ. τοι for surely, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; compare τοιγάρτοι. B) POSITION: γάρ properly stands after the first word in a clause, but in Pocts it frequently stands third or fourth, when the preceding words are closely connected, as ὁ μὲν γὰρ. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; χἠ ναῦς γὰρ. [Refs]; τό τ᾽ εἰκαθεῖν γὰρ. [Refs]; τὸ μὴ θέμις γὰρ. [Refs 4th c.BC+]: sometimes for metrical reasons, where there is no such connexion, as third [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in later Comedy texts fifth [Refs 4th c.BC+]; once sixth in [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.2) inserted before the demonstrative -ί, as νυνγαρί for νυνὶ γά; compare νυνί. C) QUANTITY: γάρ is sometimes long in [Refs 8th c.BC+].—In Attic dialect always short: [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
γάρ
Transliteration:
gár
Pronounciation:
gar
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Definition:
properly, assigning a reason (used in argument, explanation or intensification; often with other particles); and, as, because (that), but, even, for, indeed, no doubt, seeing, then, therefore, verily, what, why, yet; a primary particle;

Invisible [One]
Strongs:
Word:
ἀόρατον
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Adjective Accusative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
DESCRIBING a male person or thing that is having something done to them
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
invisible
Tyndale
Word:
ἀόρατος
Transliteration:
aoratos
Gloss:
invisible
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἀόρατος, -ον (< ὁράω), [in LXX: Gen.1:2 (תֹּהוּ), Isa.45:3 (מִסְתָּר), 2Ma.9:5 *;] unseen, invisible: Rom.1:20, Col.1:15-16, 1Ti.1:17, Heb.11:27. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ἀόρατος
Transliteration:
aoratos
Gloss:
invisible
Morphhology:
Greek, Adjective
Definition:
ἀόρᾱ-τος, ον, unseen, invisible, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὸ ἀόρατον the unseen world, the unseen, ἐξ οὐρανοῦ καὶ τοῦ ἀ.[Refs 5th c.BC+]obscure, [NT+2nd c.AD+]. adverb -τως[Refs 1st c.AD+] II) active, not having seen, without experience of, παντὸς κακοῦ, δεινοῦ, [Refs 2nd c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ἀόρατος
Transliteration:
aóratos
Pronounciation:
ah-or'-at-os
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adjective
Definition:
invisible; invisible (thing); from g1 (Α) (as a negative particle) and g3707 (ὁρατός);

as
Strongs:
Word:
ὡς
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Conjunction
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Tyndale
Word:
ὡς
Transliteration:
hōs
Gloss:
as/when
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
ὡς, adverbial form of the relative pron. ὅς, ἥ, ὅ. I. As relat. adv. of manner, as, like as, just as, even as; 1) with a demonstrative, like οὕτως, expressed or understood: οὕτως. ὡς, Mrk.4:26, 1Co.3:15, Eph.5:28, Jas.2:12, al; ὡς. οὕτως, Act.8:32, 1Co.7:17, al; elliptically (sc. οὕτως, οὕτω), with nom, Mat.6:29, al; with accusative, Mat.19:19, Mrk.12:31, al; with prep, Mat.26:55, Mrk.14:48, Luk.22:52, Jhn.7:10, al; with verb, Jhn.15:6, 2Co.3:1, Eph.2:3, 1Th.5:6, al; with ptcp. (the ptcp. however not having the special force wh. it has in cl; see Bl, §73, 5; 74, 6), Mat.7:29, Mrk.1:22, Heb.13:17, al; freq implying opinion or belief, Rom.9:32; so esp, with genitive absol, 1Co.4:18, 2Co.5:20, 1Pe.4:12, 2Pe.1:3. 2) Before numerals, about, nearly: Mrk.5:13, Jhn.1:40, Act.5:7, al. 3) Before adjectives and adverbs, how: Rom.10:15 11:33, 1Th.2:10; with superl, ὡς τάχιστα, as quickly as possible, Act.17:15. II. As conjunction; 1) temporal, (a) as, when, since: Mrk.9:21 14:72, Luk.1:23, Jhn.2:9, al; (b) while, when, as long as: Luk.12:58, Jhn.12:36, Gal.6:10 (Field, Notes, 191); ὡς ἄν (M, Pr., 167, and see: ἄν), Rom.15:24, 1Co.11:34, Php.2:23. 2) Final, in order that; with inf, in order to (M, Pr., 204n), Luk.9:52, Act.20:24, Heb.7:9. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὡς
Transliteration:
hōs
Gloss:
as/when
Morphhology:
Greek, Conjunction
Definition:
ὡς:— Summary: A) as adverb of Manner. A.Aa) ὧς and ὥς (with accent), so, thus. A.Ab) ὡς (without accent) of the Relat. pronoun ὅς, as. A.Ac) ὡς Relat. and Interrog, how. A.Ad) ὡς temporal, when. A.Ae) ὡς Local, where, B ) ὡς, as CONJUNCTION. C,D) various usages. adverb of Manner: A.Aa) ὥς, Demonstr, ={οὕτως}, so, thus, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in Ionic dialect Prose, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὥς simply ={οὕτως}, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.2) καὶ ὧς even so, nevertheless, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; οὐδ᾽ ὧς not even so, [Refs 8th c.BC+] are used in Trag. and Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κἂν ὧς, εἴπερ μέλει σοι, ἀπόστειλόν μοί τινα [Refs 4th c.AD+]; δουλεύων καθὼς καὶ ὧς [Refs 2nd c.BC+]; Thess. καὶ οὗς [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; for this phrase the accentuation ὧς[Refs 2nd c.AD+] A.3) in Comparisons, ὥς, ὡς, so. as, etc; and reversely ὡς, ὣς, as. so, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὥς τε. ὣς, as. thus, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὥσπερ, ὣς δὲ. (in apodosi) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.4) thus, for instance, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὥς should be accented in [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.4.Ab) ὡς, Relat, as, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; properly relative to a demonstrative adverb, which is frequently omitted, κινήθη δ᾽ ἀγορὴ ὡς κύματα μακρὰ θαλάσσης, i. e. οὕτως, ὡς, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; compare ὥτε. Usage: A.I) in similes, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; longer similes are commonly introduced by ὡς ὅτε, ὡς δ᾽ ὅτε, ἤριπε δ᾽, ὡς ὅτε πύργος [ἤριπε] [Refs]; so later, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is rare in short similes, [Refs 8th c.BC+] is followed by indicative present, [Refs 8th c.BC+]aorist, [Refs]; also by subjunctive present or aorist, [Refs] (sometimes ὡς δ᾽ ὅτ᾽ ἄν, [Refs]; compare ὥστε A:—the Verb is sometimes omitted with ὡς, but may be supplied from the context, ἐνδούπησε πεσοῦσ᾽, ὡς εἰναλίη κήξ (i.e. πίπτει) [Refs 8th c.BC+] follows the noun to which it refers, it takes the accent; so in Comedy texts, Ἀριστόδημος ὥς [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see infr. H. A.I.2) like as, just as, ὡς οὗτος κατὰ τέκν᾽ ἔφαγε, ὣς ἡμεῖς κτλ. [Refs 8th c.BC+] A.I.3) sometimes in the sense as much as or according as, ἑλὼν κρέας ὥς (i. e. ὅσον) οἱ χεῖρες ἐχάνδανον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὦκα δὲ μητρὶ ἔννεπον ὡς (i. e. ὅσα) εἶδόν τε καὶ ἔκλυον [Refs 8th c.BC+]; so in Trag, σοὶ θεοὶ πόροιεν ὡς ἐγὼ θέλω [Refs 5th c.BC+]; in Prose, ὡς δύναται as much as he can, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς μή ={ὅσον μή, νέμεν ὅτι ἃν} (={ἂν}) βόλητοι ὡς μὴ ἰν τοῖ περιχώροι [Refs 4th c.BC+]; cf. Ab. 11.2 below A.I.4) sometimes after comparative, compared with, hence than, μᾶλλον πρέπει οὕτως ὡς. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδενὸς μᾶλλον φροντίζειν ὡς. [Refs 2nd c.BC+] is uncertain in [Refs 4th c.BC+], and [ἢ] should perhaps be inserted in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; compare ὥσπερ IV. A.II) with Adverbial clauses: A.II.1) parenthetically, in qualifying clauses, ὡς ἔοικε, etc, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in these cases γε or γοῦν is frequently added, ὡς γοῦν ὁ λόγος σημαίνει as at any rate the argument shows, [Refs]; in some phrases with infinitive, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] τὸ σφέτερον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς γὰρ. ἤκουσά τινος, ὅτι. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἁνὴρ ὅδ᾽ ὡς ἔοικεν οὐ νεμεῖν (for οὐ νεμεῖ, ὡς ἔοικε), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.2) in elliptical phrases, so far as. (compare supr. Ab.[Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀπ᾽ ὀμμάτων (i.e. εἰκάσαι) to judge by eyesight, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: especially in such phrases as οὐκέτι πολλὸν χωρίον, ὡς εἶναι Αἰγύπτου [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐδὲ ἀδύνατος, ὡς Αακεδαιμόνιος for a Lacedaemonian, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; φρονεῖ. ὡς γυνὴ μέγα for a woman, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πιστός, ὡς νομεύς, ἀνήρ [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—for ὡς εἰπεῖν and the like, see below [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.II.3) ὡς attached to the object of the Verb, as, ἑωυτὸν ὡς ἐχθρὸν λυπέει [Refs 5th c.BC+].— For the similar usage of ὡς with Participles and Prepositions, see below with A.III) with Adverbs: A.III.a) with the Posit, ὡς ἀληθῶς truly, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἑτέρως in the other way, [Refs 4th c.BC+] (adverb of ὁ ἕτερο; see at {ἕτερος} see 2) (see. below [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὡς ἠπίως, ὡς ἐτητύμως, [LXX+5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐναλλάξ [Refs 4th c.BC+]; in ὣς αὔτως (see. ὡσαύτως) we have the adverb of ὁ αὐτός, but the ὥς retains its demonstrative force, as does ὁ in Homer; ὡς ἀληθῶς, ὡς ὁμοίως, and ὡς παντελῶς may be modelled on ὣς αὔτως, with which they are nearly synonymous; so also ὡς ἑτέρως and ὡς ἐναλλάξ, which are contrasted with it. A.III.b) with adverbs expressing anything extraordinary, θαυμαστῶς or θαυμασίως ὡς, ὑπερφυῶς ὡς, (see entry); ὡς is sometimes separated by several words from its adverb, as θαυμαστῶς μοι εἶπες ὡς παρα᾽ δόξαν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.c) with the superlative, as much as can be, ὡς μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+] as easily as possible, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὠς τάχιστα as quickly as possible, [Refs 7th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀνυστὸν κάλλιστα Diog.[Refs 2nd c.AD+] are sometimes found together, where one is superfluous, ὡς ὅτι μάλιστα [Refs 5th c.BC+]; see infr. G. A.III.d) with comparative, ὡς θᾶσσον [Refs 2nd c.BC+] A.III.e) in the phrases ὡς τὸ πολύ, ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πολύ, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πλεῖον for the more part, commonly, ὡς ἐπὶ πλεῖστον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πλῆθος, ὡς πλήθει, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) with adjectives, A.III.2.a) Posit, ὑπερφυεῖ τινι. ὡς μεγάλῃ βλάβῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2.b) with superlative, ὡς ἄριστοι τὰς φύσεις [Refs] A.III.2.c) separated from the adjective by a preposition, ὡς ἐς ἐλάχιστον [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2.Ac) Relat. and Interrog, how, μερμήριζε. ὡς Ἀχιλῆα τιμήσειε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς πέπραται how, i. e. at what price the goods have been sold, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; so οὐκ ἔσθ᾽ ὡς. (for the more usually ὅπως) nowise can it be that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐκ ἔσθ᾽ ὡς οὐ, [Refs]; οἶσθ᾽ ὡς πόησο; by a mixture of constructions for ὡς χρὴ ποιῆσαι or ὡς ποιήσεις, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οἶσθ᾽ ὡς μετεύξει is falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; similarly, οἶσθα. ὡς νῦν μὴ σφαλῇς [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2) ὡς ἂν ποήσῃς however (in whatever way) thou mayest act, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A.III.2.Ad) Temporal, when, with past tenses of the indicative, ἐνῶρτο γέλως, ὡς ἴδον [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with optative, to express a repeated action, whenever, ὡς. ἐς τὴν Μιλησίην ἀπίκοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+]: rarely with subjunctive, to denote what happens under certain conditions, τῶν δὲ ὡς ἕκαστός οἱ μειχθῇ, διδοῖ δῶρον [Refs]; later, ὡς ἄν with subjunctive, when, [NT+3rd c.BC+]; ὡς ἂν τάχιστα λάβῃς τὴν ἐπιστολήν as soon as. [LXX+3rd c.BC+]: in indirect speech with infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+] as soon as ever, [Refs 5th c.BC+] stand together, [Refs 4th c.BC+]: but this usage must be distinguished from signf. Ab.111.1c: followed by demonstrative, ὡς εἶδ᾽, ὣς ἀνεπᾶλτο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; the second ὣς is repeated, ἁ δ᾽ Ἀταλάντα ὡς ἴδεν, ὣς ἐμάνη, ὣς ἐς βαθὺν ἅλατ᾽ ἔρωτα [Refs 3rd c.BC+] A.III.2) ὡς appears to be falsa lectio for{ἕως} in ὡς ἂν αὑτὸς ἥλιος. αἴρῃ [Refs 5th c.BC+]: but in later Gr. ={ἕως}, while, ὡς τὸ φῶς ἔχετε [NT]; also until, τίθεται ἐπὶ ἀνθράκων ὡς ἀναξηρανθῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἔα ἀφρίζειν τὴν πίσσαν ὡς οὗ ἐκλείπῃ [Refs];compare [Refs 4th c.BC+] A.III.2.Ae) Local, where, in dialects, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] B) ὡς as CONJUNCTION: B.I) with Substantive clauses, to express a fact, ={ὅτι}, that. B.II) with Final clauses, to express an end or purpose, ={ἵνα, ὅπως}, so that, in order that. B.III) Consecutive, ={ὥστε}, so that. B.IV) Causal, since, because. B.I) with Substantive Clauses, with verbs of learning, saying, etc, that, expressing a fact, γνωτὸν, ὡς ἤδη Τρώεσσιν ὀλέθρου πείρατ᾽ ἐφῆπται [Refs 8th c.BC+]: with Verbs of fear or anxiety, with future indicative, μηκέτ᾽ ἐκφοβοῦ, μητρῷον ὥς σε λῆμ᾽ ἀτιμάσει ποτέ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; μὴ φοβοῦ ὡς ἀπορήσεις [Refs 4th c.BC+]; a sentence beginning with ὡς is sometimes, when interrupted, resumed by ὅτι, and vice versa, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so ὡς with a finite Verb passes into the accusative and infinitive, [Refs 5th c.BC+] is followed by indicative, after historic tenses by optative (sometimes by indicative, both constructions in ὑπίσχοντο. ἀμυνέειν, φράζοντες ὡς οὔ σφι περιοπτέη ἐστὶ ἡ Ἑλλὰς ἀπολλυμένη. ἀλλὰ τιμωρητέον εἴη [Refs 5th c.BC+]: sometimes with optative after a primary tense, κατάπτονται. λέγοντες ὡς Ἀρίστων. οὐ φήσειε [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.I.2) with Verbs of feeling, χαίρει δέ μοι ἦτορ, ὥς μευ ἀεὶ μέμνησαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] B.II) with Final Clauses, that, in order that; in this sense ὡς and ὡς ἄν, Epic dialect ὥς κεν, are used with the subjunctive after primary tenses of the indicative, and with the optative after the past tenses, βουλὴν ὑποθησόμεθ᾽, ὡς μὴ πάντες ὄλωνται [Refs 8th c.BC+]future indicative, ὡς μὴ ὦν αὐτοὶ τε ἀπολέεσθε (conjecture Cobet for ἀπόλεσθε) κἀμὲ τρώσετε, ἐς ἄλλον τινὰ δῆμον ἀποίχεσθε [Refs 4th c.BC+] B.II.2) ὡς is also used with past tenses of the indicative to express a purpose which has not been or cannot be fulfilled, τί μ᾽ οὐκ ἔκτεινας, ὡς ἔδειξα μήποτε; so that I never should, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.II.3) ὡς with infinitive, to limit an assertion, ὡς μὲν ἐμοὶ δοκέειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; or ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν,compare ἔπος [Refs]; ὡς συντόμως, or ὡς συνελόντι εἰπεῖν to speak shortly, to be brief, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς εἰκάσαι to make a guess, i.e. probably, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III) to express Consequence, like{ὥστε}, so that, frequently in [Refs 5th c.BC+] in breadth such that two triremes could sail abreast, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Trag. and Prose, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also, like{ὥστε}, with Indic, οὕτω κλεινὴ ἐγένετο, ὡς. ἐξέμαθον [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.2) ἢ ὡς after a comparative, μάσσον᾽ ἢ ὡς ἰδέμεν [Refs 5th c.BC+] too few to, [Refs 5th c.BC+] too old to. [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.III.3) ὡς is sometimes omitted where the antecedent demonstrative is expressed, οὕτω ἰσχυραί, μόγις ἂν διαρρήξειας so strong, you could hardly break them, [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV) Causal, inasmuch as, since, τί ποτε λέγεις, ὦ τέκνο; ὡς οὐ μανθάνω [Refs 5th c.BC+] B.IV.2) on the ground that, with future indicative, [Refs 5th c.BC+] C) ὡς before C.I) Participles; C.II) Prepositions; and C.III) ὡς itself as a Preposition. C.IV) with Participles in the case of the Subject, to mark the reason or motive of the action, as if, as, ὡς οὐκ ἀΐοντι ἐοικώς [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ἀγανακτοῦσιν ὡς μεγάλων τινῶν ἀπεστερημένοι (i. e. ἡγούμενοι μεγάλων τινῶν ἀπεστερῆσθαι), [Refs 5th c.BC+]: most frequently with participle future, διαβαίνει, ὡς ἀμήσων τὸν σῖτον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; with verbs of knowing, ἐπιστάσθω Κροῖσος ὡς ὕστερον. ἁλοὺς τῆς πεπρωμένης [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς μὴ 'μπολήσων ἴσθι. [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.IV.2) with Participles in oblique cases, λέγουσιν ἡμᾶς ὡς ὀλωλότας they speak of us as dead, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐν ὀλιγωρίᾳ ἐποιοῦντο, ὡς, ὅταν ἐξέλθωσιν, ἢ οὐχ ὑπομενοῦντας σφᾶς ἢ ῥᾳδίως ληψόμενοι βίᾳ made light of the matter, in the belief that, [Refs 5th c.BC+]—Both constructions in one sentence, τοὺς κόσμους εἴασε χαίρειν ὡς ἀλλοτρίους τε ὄντας καὶ πλέον θάτερον ἡγησάμενος ἀπεργάζεσθαι [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.IV.3) with Parts. put absolutely in genitive, νῦν δέ, ὡς οὕτω ἐχόντων, στρατιὴν ἐκπέμπετε [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐρώτα ὅτι βούλει, ὡς τἀληθῆ ἐροῦντος [Refs 5th c.BC+]: so also in accusative, μισθὸν αἰτοῦσιν, ὡς οὐχὶ αὐτοῖσιν ὠφελίαν ἐσομένην ἐκ τοῦ ἄρχειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]: with both cases in one sentence, ὡς καὶ τῶν Ἀθηναίων προσδοκίμων ὄντων ἄλλῃ στρατιᾷ καὶ. διαπεπολεμησόμενον [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II) ὡς before Preps, ἀνήγοντο ὡς ἐπὶ ναυμαχίαν (variant{-ίᾳ}) [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κατέλαβε τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ὡς ἐπὶ τυραννίδι, expressing the purpose, [Refs 5th c.BC+] marks an intention; not so in the following: ἀπαγγέλλετε τῇ μητρὶ [χαίρειν] ὡς παρ᾽ ἐμοῦ [Refs 5th c.BC+] C.II.b) later, in geographical expressions, of direction, προϊών, ὡς ἐπὶ τὸν Πηνειόν [Refs 1st c.BC+]; ὡς εἰς Φηραίαν (to be read Ἡραίαν) ἰόντων [Refs] C.III) ὡς as a preposition, properly in cases where the object is a person, not a place: once in [Refs 8th c.BC+] (variant{ἐς τὸν ὁμοῖον},compare αἶνος Ὁμηρικός, αἰὲν ὁμοῖον ὡς θεός. ἐς τὸν ὁμοῖον ἄγει [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; ἔρχεται. ἕκαστον τὸ ὅμοιον ὡς τὸ ὅ, τὸ πυκνὸν ὡς τὸ πυκνόν κτλ. (with variant{ἐς}) [Refs 5th c.BC+] as. so, in [Refs 8th c.BC+].έ: frequently in Attic dialect, ὡς Ἆγιν ἐπρεσβεύσαντο [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ναῦς ἐς τὸν Ἑλλήσποντον ὡς Φαρνάβαζον ἀποπέμπειν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; the examples of ὡς with names of places are corrupt, e.g. ὡς τὴν Μίλητον [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς Ἄβυδον one Ms. in [Refs 5th c.BC+] is equivalent to ὡς ἐμὲ τὸν ἀδελφό; in [Refs] D) ὡς in independent sentences: D.I) as an exclamation, how, mostly with adverbs and adjectives, ὡς ἄνοον κραδίην ἔχες how silly a heart hadst thou! [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀγαθὸν καὶ παῖδα λιπέσθαι how good is it, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς ἀστεῖος ὁ ἄνθρωπος how charming he is! [LXX+5th c.BC+]; in indirect clauses, ἐθαύμασα τοῦτο, ὡς ἡδέως. ἀπεδέξατο marvelled at seeing how, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.I.2) with Verbs, ὥς μοι δέχεται κακὸν ἐκ κακοῦ αἰεί how constantly, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς οὐκ ἔστι χάρις μετόπισθ᾽ εὐεργέων how little thanks remain! [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὡς ὄχλος νιν. ἀμφέπει see how, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ὑπερδέδοικά σου how greatly, [Refs 5th c.BC+] D.II) to mark a wish, oh that! with optative alone, ὡς ἔρις. ἀπόλοιτο [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also ὡς ἄν or κε with optative, ὡς ἂν ἔπειτ᾽ ἀπὸ σεῖο οὐκ ἐθέλοιμι λείπεσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] D.II.2) joined with other words of wishing, ὡς ὤφελες αὐτόθ᾽ ὀλέσθαι [Refs 8th c.BC+] E) ὡς with numerals marks that they are to be taken only as a round number, as it were, about, nearly, σὺν ἀνθρώποις ὡς εἴκοσι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὡς πέντε μάλιστά κῃ about five (see. μάλα [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—also with words compounded with numerals, δέπας. ὡς τριλάγυνον [Refs 7th c.BC+]; παῖς ὡς ἑπτέτης of some seven years, [Refs 5th c.BC+] F) ὡς in some elliptical (or apparently elliptical) phrases: F.1) ὡς τί δὴ τόδε (i.e. γένηται); to what end? [Refs 5th c.BC+] F.2) know that (i.e. ἴσθι), ὡς ἔστιν ἀνδρὸς τοῦδε τἄργα ταῦτά σοι [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so in Comedy texts, ὡς ἔστ᾽ ἐν ἡμῖν τῆς πόλεως τὰ πράγματα [Refs 5th c.BC+] F.3) ὡς ἕκαστος, ἕκαστοι, each severally (whether in respect of time, place, or other difference), ξυνελέγοντο. Κορίνθιοι δισχίιοι ὁπλῖται, οἱ δ᾽ ἄλλοι ὡς ἕκαστοι, Φλειάσιοι δὲ πανστρατιᾷ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρώτη τε αὕτη πόλις ξυμμαχὶς παρὰ τὸ καθεστηκὸς ἐδουλώθη, ἔπειτα δὲ καὶ τῶν ἄλλων ὡς ἑκάστη [ξυνέβη] (ξ. secl. Krüger: ἀπὸ κοινοῦ ἐδουλώθη [Refs]; χρησμολόγοι τε ᾖδον χρησμοὺς παντοίους, ὧν ἀκροᾶσθαι ὡς ἕκαστος ὥρμητο, i. e. different persons ran to listen to different prophecies, [Refs]; τὰς ἄλλας ὡς ἑκάστην ποι ἐκπεπτωκυῖαν ἀναδησάμενοι ἐκόμιζον ἐς τὴν πόλιν they made fast to the rest wherever each (ship) had been run ashore, [Refs]; οἱ δ᾽ οὖν ὡς ἕκαστοι Ἕλληνες κατὰ πόλεις τε ὅσοι ἀλλήλων ξυνίεσαν καὶ ξύμπαντες ὕστερον κληθέντες οὐδὲν πρὸ τῶν Τρωικῶν. ἁθρόοι ἔπραξαν the various peoples that were later called by the common name of Greeks, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὡς ἑκάστην (one by one) αἱρέοντες (i.e. τὰς νήσους) οἱ βάρβαροι ἐσαγήνευον τοὺς ἀνθρώπους [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; rarely with a Verb, ὡς ἕκαστος ἀπικνέοιτο [Refs 5th c.BC+] follows ἕκαστος, ἑκάστῳ ὡς ὁ Θεὸς ἐμέρισεν μέτρον πίστεως [NT]:—for the etymology see infr. H; also ὡς ἑκάτεροι [Refs 5th c.BC+] G) ὡς pleonastic in ὡς ὅτι [NT+8th c.BC+] H) Etymology: this word is in origin five distinct words: [Refs]as' is the adverb from the Relat. ὅς (I.-[Refs 5th c.BC+] stem yo-); with ὡς βέλτιστος cf. Sanskrit yācchrē[snull][tnull]á[hudot] 'the best possible': (2) ὧς 'thus' is the adverb of a Demonstr. stem so- found in Sanskrit sa, Gr. ὁ, Latin sō-c ([Refs]; = ita, cf. Umbr. esoc); (3) ὡς postpositive (ὄρνιθες ὥς, etc.) constantly makes a preceding short closed syllable long in [Refs 8th c.BC+], and must therefore have been ϝω; it may perhaps be related to Sanskrit vā, a form of va, iva (= [Refs]like), Latin ve, Gr. ἦ[ϝ] ; [Refs]to' is of doubtful origin (perhaps from *ὠς, cognate with Latin ōs 'face', Sanskrit ās: ὤς τινα ἐλθεῖν like{τί δέ δε φρένας ἵκετο πένθος};); (5) ὡς F. 3 is probably ϝως, adverb of ϝός the reflexive adjective, and means literal in his (their) own way (or place); it is idiomatically placed before ἕκαστος (ἑκάτερος),compare ϝὸν ϝεκάτερος [Refs]
Strongs
Word:
ὡς
Transliteration:
hōs
Pronounciation:
hoce
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Adverb
Definition:
which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows); about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed; probably adverb of comparative from g3739 (ὅς);

seeing,
Strongs:
Word:
ὁρῶν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Present Active Participle Nominative Singular Masculine
Grammar:
an ACTION that is happening - done by a male person or thing that is doing something
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to see (see)
Tyndale
Word:
ὁράω
Transliteration:
horaō
Gloss:
: see
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ὁράω, -ῶ, [in LXX chiefly for ראה, also for חזה, etc;] in "durative" sense (hence aor. act, εἶδον, pass, ὤφθην, fut, ὄψομαι, from different roots; see M, Pr., 110f.), to see (in colloq. even the pres. is rare, its place being generally taken by θεωρέω, see BL, §24). 1) Of bodily vision, to see, perceive, behold: absol, Mrk.6:38, al; ἔρχου καὶ ἴδε, Jhn.1:46, al; before ὅτι, Mrk.2:16, al; with accusative, Mat.2:2, Mrk.1:10 16:7, Gal.1:19, al; θεόν, Jhn.1:18, 1Jn.4:20, al. 2) to see with the mind, perceive, discern: absol, Rom.15:21; with accusative of thing(s), Mat.9:2 27:54, Act.8:23, Col.2:18, al. 3) to see, take heed, beware: ὅρα μή, with aor. subjc, Mat.8:4 18:10, Mrk.1:44, 1Th.5:15; id, sc. μὴ ποήσῃς, Rev.19:10 22:9 (Bl, §81, 1); before imperat. Mat.9:30 16:6, Mrk.8:15 4) to experience: τ. θάνατον, Luk.2:26, Heb.11:5; ζωήν, Jhn.3:36; τ. διαφθοράν, Act.2:27. 5) to visit: with accusative of person(s), Luk.8:20, Jhn.12:21, Rom.1:11, al; with accusative loc, Act.19:21. 6) to see to, care for: Mat.27:4, Act.18:15 (cf. ἀφ, καθ, προ, συν-οράω). SYN.: see: βλέπω. (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
ὁράω
Transliteration:
horaō
Gloss:
: see
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
ὁράω, contraction ὁρῶ even in [Refs 8th c.BC+], Epic dialect ὁρόω [Refs], etc; Aeolic dialect ὄρημι (which see); Ionic dialect ὁρέω [Refs 5th c.BC+], 2nd pers. singular ὁρῇς [Refs 3rd c.BC+], 3rd.pers. singular ὁρῇ [Refs 5th c.BC+]; infinitive ὁρῆν [Refs 5th c.BC+] (but 2nd pers. singular ὁρᾷς [Refs 7th c.BC+], 3rd.pers. singular ὁρᾷ [Refs 7th c.BC+]; 1st pers. plural ὁρῶμεν [Refs]; 3rd.pers. plural ὁρῶσι (ἐπ-) [Refs]infinitive ὁρᾶν[Refs] (except when found in Doric dialect, as [Refs 4th c.BC+]; imperfect 3rd.pers. singular ἑώρη [Refs 5th c.BC+]; Ionic dialect 3rd.pers. singular ὥρα [Refs 5th c.BC+],2nd pers. plural ὡρᾶτε [Refs] 3rd.pers. plural ὥρων [Refs]; Epic dialect 3rd.pers. singular ὅρα [Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect ἑόρᾱκα, a form required by the metre in many passages, as [Refs 5th c.BC+]; whence ἑόρακα, -άκη ought always to be restored in early Attic dialect writers, though ἑώρακα was used in later Gr, [Refs 3rd c.BC+] (ἑώρακε[ν] is probably in [Refs 4th c.BC+]imperfect probably comes from ἠ- ϝορ- (with a long form of the augment, compare ἠειδ- (ᾐδ-) in imperfect of οἶδα, while ἑορ- in the perfect comes from ϝε-ϝορ, see below: Ionic dialect perfect ὁρώρηκα [Refs 3rd c.BC+]; Doric dialect perfect participle ὡρακυῖα [Refs 4th c.BC+]; 1st pers. singular ὥρακα[Refs]: an aorist 1 ἐσορήσαις only falsa lectio in [Refs 5th c.AD+] —middle ὁράομαι, contraction ὁρῶμαι even in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; Epic dialect 2nd pers. singular ὅρηαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]imperfect ἑωρώμην, also ὡρώμην (προ-) [NT], Epic dialect 3rd.pers. singular ὁρᾶτο [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—passive, perfect ἑώραμαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]aorist ἑωράθην only in late Prose, [Refs 1st c.BC+]; infinitive ὁρᾱθῆναι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: future ὁραθήσομαι [Refs 2nd c.AD+] adjective ὁρᾱτός, ὁρᾱτέον[Refs 8th c.BC+] 2nd pers. plural optative ὁρόῳτε [Refs 8th c.BC+]; besides these forms from ὁρα- (ὁρη-) we have II) from root ὀπ- (see. ὄψ) the only future in use, ὄψομαι, always in active sense, [Refs 8th c.BC+], and Attic dialect, Epic dialect 2nd pers. singular ὄψεαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]aorist 1 ἐπ-όψατο in [Refs 5th c.BC+]; subjunctive ὄψησθε [NT]: perfect ὄπωπα [Refs 8th c.BC+], never in Attic dialect Prose: pluperfect 3rd.pers. singular ὀπώπει [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὀπώπεσαν [Refs] —passive, aorist 1 ὤφθην [Refs 5th c.BC+]; optative (Ionic dialect) ὀφθείησαν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; participle ὀφθείς, infinitive ὀφθῆναι, [Refs]: future ὀφθήσομαι [Refs 5th c.BC+]: perfect ὦμμαι [Refs 4th c.BC+]; compare ὀπτέον. III) from ϝιδ- are formed aorist active εἶδον, infinitive ἰδεῖν: aorist middle εἰδόμην, infinitive ἰδέσθαι: perfect with present sense οἶδα I know, infinitive εἰδέναι: verb. adjective ἰστέος (for these tenses, see at {Εἴδω}). (ὁρ- probably from ϝορ, as indicated by the imperfect and perfect forms; compare βῶροι (i.e. ϝῶροι), Engl. (a)ware.) A0) Senses: A0.I) absolutely, see, look, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]; εἴς τι or εἴς τινα to or at a thing or person, [Refs 8th c.BC+]:—middle, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; but ἔς τινα ὁρᾶν to be of so-and-so's party, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]; εἰς τὴν Ἀττάλου καθαίρεσιν εἶδεν aimed at, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὁρόων ἐπ᾽ ἀπείρονα πόντον looking over the sea, [Refs]; ὁρᾶν πρός τι look towards, ἀκρωτήριον τὸ πρὸς Μέγαρα ὁρῶν [Refs 5th c.BC+]; πρὸς πλοῦν ὁρᾷ looks to sail (i.e. is ready), [Refs 5th c.BC+] A0.I.2) have sight, opposed to μὴ ὁρᾶν, to be blind, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅσ᾽ ἂν λέγωμεν, πάνθ᾽ ὁρῶντα λέξομεν [though I am blind,] my words shall have eyes, i.e. shall be to the purpose, [Refs]; ἐν σκότῳ. οὓς μὲν οὐκ ἔδει ὀψοίαθ᾽, i.e. should be blind, [Refs]; ἀμβλύτερον ὁ, opposed to ὀξύτερον βλέπειν, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἐπὶ σμικρὸν ὁ. to be short-sighted, [Refs] A0.I.3) see to, look to, i.e. take or give heed, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὁ. εἰς γλῶσσαν. ἀνδρός look to, pay heed to, [Refs 6th c.BC+]: frequently in imperative, like{βλέπε}, followed by a dependent clause, ὅρα ὅπως. [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅρα εἰ. see whether, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ὅρα τί ποιεῖς[Refs 4th c.BC+] A0.I.4) ὁρᾷ; ὁρᾶτ; see'st thou? d'ye see? parenthetically, especially in explanations, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also ὁρᾷ; at the beginning of a sentence, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; ἀλλ᾽—ὁρᾷ; but, do you see, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὁρᾷ; ironically, [Refs 4th c.BC+] A0.I.5) with accusative cognate, like{βλέπω} 11, look so and so, δεινὸν ὁρῶν ὄσσοισι [Refs 8th c.BC+]; also ἡδέως ὁρᾶν look pleasant, [Refs 5th c.BC+] A0.II) transitive, see an object, behold, perceive, observe, with accusative, frequently in [Refs 8th c.BC+]perfect ὄπωπα exclusively in this sense, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὀφθαλμοῖσιν or ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖσιν ὁρᾶν to see with or before the eyes, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; αἰεὶ τέρμ᾽ ὁρόων always keeping it in sight, keeping his eye on it, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὁ. τινά look to (for aid), [Refs 4th c.BC+] A0.II.b) ζώει καὶ ὁρᾷ φάος ἠελίοιο, poetry for ζῆν, like{βλέπειν}, [Refs 8th c.BC+]:— in middle, φέγγος ὁρᾶσθαι [Refs]; so ὁρᾶν alone, τὰ γὰρ φθιτῶν τοῖς ὁρῶσι κόσμος [Refs] A0.II.c) followed by a clause, οὐχ ὁράᾳς οἷος; [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὁρᾷς ἡμᾶς, ὅσοι ἐσμέ; [Refs 5th c.BC+]; οὐχ ὁρᾷς ὅτι ἥμαρτε; [Refs 4th c.BC+] A0.II.d) with participle, καπνὸν. ὁρῶμεν ἀπὸ χθονὸς ἀΐσσοντα we see it rising, [Refs 8th c.BC+]; ὁρῶν ἐμαυτὸν ὧδε προυσελούμενον seeing myself thus insulted, [Refs 4th c.BC+]; ὁρῶ σε κρύπτοντα. see you hiding, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so ὁρῶ μ᾽ ἔργον ἐξειργασμένην I see that I have done, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; rarely in reference to the subject, ὁρῶ μὲν ἐξαμαρτάνων (= ὅτι ἐξαμαρτάνω) [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—so in middle, ἄνδρα διωκόμενον. ὁρῶμαι [Refs 8th c.BC+]: also with infinitive, ἑώρων οὐκέτι οἷόν τε εἶναι. [Refs 5th c.BC+] A0.II.e) rarely with genitive, οὐδεὶς Σωκράτους οὐδὲν ἀσεβὲς. οὔτε πράττοντος εἶδεν οὔτε λέγοντος ἤκουσεν (where the Constr. is suggested by the use of ἤκουσεν) [Refs 5th c.BC+] A0.II.2) see to, ἴδε πῶμα [Refs 8th c.BC+]; look out for, provide, τινί τι [LXX+5th c.BC+] A0.II.3) the infinitive is used after an adjective, δεινὸς ἰδεῖν [Refs 6th c.BC+]; ἐχθίστου. ὁρᾶν most hateful to behold, [Refs 5th c.BC+]:—middle or passive, αἰσχρὸς ὁρᾶσθαι [Refs]: with an adverb, μὴ διχορρόπως ἰδεῖν [Refs 4th c.BC+]: with a substantive, ἄνδρα τευχηστὴν ἰδεῖν [Refs]: with a Verb, πρέπουσι. ἰδεῖν [Refs 5th c.BC+] A0.II.4) middle is used by Poets like active, [Refs 8th c.BC+]middle occurs only in compounds, as προ-ορῶμαι: for the imperative ἰδοῦ, ἰδού, see at {ἰδοῦ}. A0.II.4.b) no passive is used by [Refs 8th c.BC+]; in Attic dialect the passive has the sense to be seen, [Refs 4th c.BC+]participle, ὤφθημεν ὄντες ἄθλιοι was seen in my wretchedness, [Refs 5th c.BC+]he will prove to be, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; τὰ ὁρώμενα all that is seen, things visible, like{τὰ ὁρατά}, [Refs] A0.III) metaphorically, of mental sight, discern, perceive, [Refs 5th c.BC+]; so blind Oedipus says, φωνῇ γὰρ ὁρῶ, τὸ φατιζόμενον I see by sound, as the saying is, [Refs 2nd c.AD+] A0.IV) absolutely, see visions, ὁ ἀληθινῶς ὁρῶν [LXX]:—passive, appear in a vision, ὤφθη ἄγγελος πρὸς τὴν γυναῖκα[LXX] A0.V) interview, ἐμνήσθης μοι ἰδεῖν τὸν κεραμέα περὶ τῶν κεραμίων you told me to see the potter about the jars, [Refs 3rd c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
ὁράω
Transliteration:
horáō
Pronounciation:
hor-ah'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
by extension, to attend to; by Hebraism, to experience; passively, to appear; behold, perceive, see, take heed; properly, to stare at (compare g3700 (ὀπτάνομαι)), i.e. (by implication) to discern clearly (physically or mentally);

he persevered.
Strongs:
Word:
ἐκαρτέρησεν
Context:
Next word in verse
Morphhology:
Verb Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Singular
Grammar:
an ACTION that happened - by a person or thing being discussed
Translators:
Translated the same in modern Bibles (Nestle/Aland) and the KJV (Textus Receptus).
Editions:
Additional:
to endure
Tyndale
Word:
καρτερέω
Transliteration:
kartereō
Gloss:
to endure
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
καρτερέω, -ῶ [in LXX: Job.2:9 (חָזַק hi.), Isa.42:14 (פָּאָה), Sir.2:2 12:15, 2 12:1-18, 4Macc 7:1-23 *;] to be steadfast, patient: Heb.11:27 (cf. προσ-καρτερέω). (AS)
Liddell-Scott-Jones
Word:
καρτερέω
Transliteration:
kartereō
Gloss:
to endure
Morphhology:
Greek, Verb
Definition:
καρτερ-έω, to be steadfast, patient, [Refs 5th c.BC+] to hold up against a thing, e.g. πρὸς ἡδονάς τε καὶ λύπας [Refs 5th c.BC+]; κ. ἐν ταῖς ἡδοναῖς to be patient or temperate in, [Refs]; κ. ἀπὸ τοῦ ὕπνου refrain therefrom, [Refs 2nd c.AD+]: with participle, persevere in doing, οἱ δ᾽ ἐκαρτέρουν πρὸς κῦμα λακτίζοντες [Refs 5th c.BC+]; also τὰ δείν᾽ ἐκαρτέρουν was strangely obdurate or obstinate, [Refs 5th c.BC+]: in later Prose meaning little more than wait, καρτέρει καὶ θεώρει wait and see, [LXX+2nd c.AD+] II) with accusative of things, bear patiently, endure, τὰ δ᾽ ἀδύναθ᾽ ἡμῖν καρτερεῖν οὐ ῥᾴδιον [Refs 5th c.BC+] —passive, κεκαρτέρηται τἀμά my time for patience is over, [Refs 5th c.BC+]
Strongs
Word:
καρτερέω
Transliteration:
karteréō
Pronounciation:
kar-ter-eh'-o
Language:
Greek
Morphhology:
Verb
Definition:
to be strong, i.e. (figuratively) steadfast (patient); endure; from a derivative of g2904 (κράτος) (transposed);